Government (GOVT)

GOVT 1.     Essentials Of Government. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D, U.S. Constitution + California State & Local Govt


Examines the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. system of governments and the ideas and values on which they are based. Fulfills state code requirements for U.S. Constitution and California State and Local Government. Students who believe they have a good fundamental knowledge of the institutions of American Government are encouraged to consider a designated upper division course to fulfill the state requirement.

GOVT 1H.     Honors Government. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D, U.S. Constitution + California State & Local Govt


Explores some of the most influential works of politics and political writing in American history, and challenges contemporary analysis of political institutions and processes. Examines the structure of the Constitution, issues of federalism, the growth of civil rights, and the processes of government, with a comparative element. Explores the unique characteristics of California state politics.

GOVT 10.     The Meaning of Government: An Introduction to Political Ideas. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Examination of the ideas of various authors about governing and being governed. Topics include: the scope and limits of freedom, the causes and characteristics of the state, the content of politics, the nature of authority, the problems of power and the duty to obey.

GOVT 35.     World Politics. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Basic introduction to global politics focusing on a broad range of issues and problems relating to conflict and cooperation among nations, and on similarities and differences among nations' governmental institutions, structures and processes.

GOVT 100.     Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science. 3 Units


Examines the foundations of scientific research methodology in political and social science. Designed to introduce students to the basic conceptual, observational and analytical methods of empirical research in political science and related social sciences.

GOVT 110.     Political Thought I. 3 Units


History of political theory, covering some important thinkers and topics during the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern periods.

GOVT 111.     Political Thought II. 3 Units


History of political theory, covering some important thinkers and topics from the Early Modern period to the early 20th century.

GOVT 112.     Current Political Thought. 3 Units


Current issues in political thought, with emphasis upon developments in the political philosophies of democracy, fascism, communism, conservatism, liberalism. Ideas are analyzed with reference to assumptions on which they are based and their relevance for political institutions and problems.

GOVT 113.     American Political Thought. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D, U.S. Constitution + California State & Local Govt


Assessment of ideas that are central to the development of an American political tradition, as those ideas influence government at the federal, state and local levels. Meets the state requirements in U.S. Constitution and California State and Local Government.

GOVT 115.     Democratic Theory. 3 Units


Introduction to basic questions of democracy. Draws on classical and contemporary writings to explore what democracy means and various forms of democratic government, politics, and culture: direct, representative, liberal, republican, pluralist, elitist. Specific topics may include: definitions of democracy, justifications for democracy, arguments for increasing or limiting democratic participation, tasks of political representatives, democratization of social institutions, and the relationship between globalization and democracy.

GOVT 117.     Black Political Thought. 3 Units


Systematically and analytically introduces the predominant political trends and concepts presently entertained and harbored in the Black Community. A necessary adjunct to this dialogue is the racist theme in American society since on balance this is the matrix out of which the political alternatives and concepts grew. Cross Listed: ETHN 117; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 118.     Just War, Natural Right, and the Law of Nations. 3 Units


Examines fundamental conceptual questions about morality, law, and international relations through great works of political theory. Topics will cover natural right, sovereignty, just war, imperialism, national security, and international obligations. Authors read will include Thucydides, Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Grotius, Montesquieu, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill and Nietzsche.

GOVT 119A.     Socialism Marxism-Communism. 3 Units


Analyzes the basic writings and ideas of Socialist and Marxist writers and the implications of their ideas.

GOVT 119B.     Greek Political Thought. 3 Units


Study of the political thought of Greece from Homer to Demosthenes, including Plato, Thucydides, Sophocles, and other Greek thinkers. Topics include the birth of democracy, the sciences and philosophy, Athens' rise to prominence, its defense of freedom against Persia, and its own development of an empire. Examination of Greek thoughts about justice, authority, freedom, equality, and culture. The events that shaped ideas and ideas that shaped events, as well as our understanding of the modern world, will be covered.

GOVT 119D.     The Shaping of the Modern World. 3 Units


In-depth studies of thinkers who have both shaped and reflected on the shaping of the modern world. For example, Lewis Mumford, Erich Fromm, Michael Harrington, C.B. MacPherson, Leo Strauss, Norman O. Brown.

GOVT 120A.     Constitutional Law. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Basic junior level course in Public Law. A study of leading decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and other materials pertaining to the power of Congress, the President and the Judiciary; relations between states and nation; and civil rights. Considers such topics as the separation of powers, judicial review, Congress, and the President.

GOVT 120B.     Constitutional Rights and Liberties. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Basic junior level course in Public Law. A study of rights and immunities under the U.S. Constitution: examines leading decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and other materials pertaining to freedom of expression, freedom of association, equality and due process of law.

GOVT 121.     American Legal History. 3 Units


Examines the interaction of law, society, and politics in America from the colonial period to the present with special emphasis on law as an arena of social and cultural conflict. Major topics include the development of the common law in early America; the law of slavery and its impact on constitutional development; the role of the law in defining controversies over race and gender; legal thought and education; and the role of the Supreme Court in 20th Century America. Cross Listed: HIST 180; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 122.     The Law and Bureaucracy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examines constitutional and statutory limits of bureaucratic power in the American political system.

GOVT 123.     Elements Of Law. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Current legal thought in the U.S. with special emphasis on the relationship of law to history, economics, anthropology, and government; the nature of law; the role of legislators, lawyers, and judges in making the legal system.

GOVT 126.     Politics and Lawyers. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examines and analyzes the pervasiveness of lawyers and their activities in political realities; what do lawyers do; politics of prosecution and defense; politics within the profession; professional mobility; politics of the judiciary; lawyers in government.

GOVT 127.     Elements of International Law. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


While tracing the evolution of historical antecedents, centers upon modern literature in the field. The scope is broad and the problems vary, but among the areas to be studied are: 1) Is international law really law?; 2) historical foundations; 3) international legal institutions and structures; 4) supra-legal international orders, structures, and institutions and their meaning to international law; 5) world order and world law; and 6) an international "Bill of Rights.

GOVT 128.     Environment and the Law. 3 Units


Introduction to environmental law, including: the evolution of environmental legislation, environmental issues in the court system, environmental regulation and administrative law and environmental torts. Emphasis is on understanding legal process and the special challenges environmental problems present to the legal system. Cross Listed: ENVS 128; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 130.     International Politics. 3 Units


Basic junior-level course in International Relations. Current international tensions; the motivating forces influencing world politics; and the role of diplomacy and international organizations in resolving conflicts.

GOVT 131.     International Organization. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examines human efforts to create supranational organizations to promote world peace and prosperity. The focus will be on social, political, and economic activities and problems which have developed and proliferated since the end of the second World War.

GOVT 132.     War and Peace in the Nuclear Age. 3 Units


Covers the discovery of atomic fission, the development of the atomic bomb and the evolution of U.S. nuclear weapons and strategy from 1945 to the present. It examines political, strategic, bureaucratic, economic and cultural forces that have shaped U.S. nuclear policy since Hiroshima. The problem of international security in the Nuclear Age is also addressed.

GOVT 133.     American Defense and National Security. 3 Units


Analyzes U.S. security policy, looking at the structure and ideologies of the security system, the requirements of national defense, and the roles played by conventional and nuclear weapons in protecting and promoting American security.

GOVT 134.     War, Peace and the Mass Media. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Concerned with the relationship of mass media to war and the possibilities for peace, with emphasis on recent concepts of political communication. Cross Listed: JOUR 134; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 135.     American Foreign Policy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Institutions, practices and development of American foreign policy; the interaction of domestic and foreign factors on the formulating of American foreign policy since World War II.

GOVT 136.     International Political Economy. 3 Units


Analyzes the interaction between politics and economics at the international level. Covers basic theoretical approaches; historical evolution of international economy; creation and role of international financial institutions; development issues; globalization and integration.

GOVT 137.     Nationalism. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 35 or GOVT 130 or instructor permission.


Focuses on major theories of nationalism. Examines the literature dealing with theories explaining the emergence of nationalism and its political consequences; develops a comprehensive set of empirical indicators of nationalism, together with several working hypotheses regarding political manifestations of nationalism; provides the analytic frame for understanding nationalism; and applies theories to explain political behaviors of nations.

GOVT 138.     UN Simulation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior status or above, a minimum 3.0 GPA in the major, GOVT 130 and/or GOVT 140, or instructor permission.


Seminar experience for upper level Government and International Relations concentration majors. Students will prepare for and participate in a national intercollegiate model UN conference.

Note: Course repeatable with instructor permission.

GOVT 139A.     Globalization. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


Explores the nature of, and issues in, globalization. It does so in five parts. Part I examines alternative conceptions of globalization. Part II identifies and examines the primary forms of economic globalization. Part III considers globalization's effects on the territorial state, the welfare state, organized violence, culture, immigration, gender, and the environment. Part IV investigates the politics of the anti-globalization backlash. Part V concludes with an assessment of the shape and future of contemporary globalization.

GOVT 139B.     International Politics and International Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 130 or Instructor Permission


This course examines the origins and evolution of the theory and practice of international development; considers the meaning of international development; examines theoretical models and approaches to understanding the conditions, effects, and processes of international development. It explores the history and current state of theories and approaches to international development and addresses contemporary and essential issues in the field.

GOVT 139G.     Intelligence and Espionage. 3 Units


Involves students in the study of the field of intelligence, as it relates to national security, foreign policy, law and ethics. Comparative analysis of the practice and experience of the U.S., the former Soviet Union and other nations will be emphasized.

GOVT 139S.     Topics in Human Security. 3 Units


This course introduces students to the broad field of the study of human security and many essential current topics in that field, such as access to food and water, security against personal violence, and economic security. Students will examine how international forces and structural elements of society can endanger or ensure the security of groups and individuals within the borders of nation-states. Students will learn to research, analyze, and address the connections between international forces and their affects upon human beings around the world.

GOVT 140.     The Study of Comparative Government and Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Survey of the field of comparative government and politics including a review of historic uses of comparison in political science research but with emphasis on the methods of study and analytical means of research currently employed. The subject matter of study: national political systems of all types and the component parts of political systems will be an integral feature.

GOVT 141.     Politics of the African Diaspora. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), GE AREA D


Examines the social, political, cultural, and economic factors which have been important to the African diaspora. Examines how African people have responded to those factors, both in terms of formal, political thought, and in terms of political movements and political institutions. Examines thought and practice, comparability to Africa, U.S., Caribbean, Central and South America. Cross Listed: ETHN 141; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 142.     Government and Politics in Africa. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Deals with the politics and governments of Africa. The most important themes concern precolonial African systems, colonialism, nationalism and nation-building. Previous exposure to African Studies is desired but not required.

GOVT 143.     Causes of War, Causes of Peace. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Explores the entire conflict process associated with war from a variety of theoretical and methodological angles, including rationalist and behavioral models. Examines the concept of war and why wars begin. Looks at how violent international conflict is resolved. Investigates the role of the international community in the management of violent conflict, how peace processes are implemented, what leads to successful negotiations, and how war crimes and post-conflict reconciliation issues are resolved.

GOVT 144.     Government and Politics in Europe. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Study of national and regional politics, governmental institutions and public problems in Europe since 1945. In different semesters there may be investigation of several, but varying, national systems, of cross-national political behavior, or of regional integration processes. May be taken more than once if there are different topics and instructor permission.

GOVT 145.     Government and Politics in Asia. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Survey of governmental institutions and political processes in East and Southeast Asia. Focuses on the region's politics, dynamic economic growth, complex security context, resurgence of nationalism, and attempts to build multilateral institutions.

GOVT 147.     Latin American Government and Politics. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Two-part examination of government, politics, political change and political groups in Latin America. Part one examines the development of government, politics, political change and political groups. Part two presents national case studies.

GOVT 148.     Governments and Politics in the Middle East. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Survey of the governmental institutions and the political processes in the region, with emphasis on the problems of social change. Focuses on the colonial situation, the growth of nationalism, the revolution of rising expectations, Islamic political theory and its contemporary manifestations, the role of the military, and the current regional conflicts.

GOVT 149A.     Original Research in Comparative Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


Students will engage in a cross-national research agenda. Students will conduct original research in comparative politics, which requires an appreciation for distinct learning cultures in different countries. Countries acceptable for comparison will vary with instructor.

GOVT 150.     American Governments. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: U.S. Constitution + California State & Local Govt, GE AREA D


Federal system of government; the U.S. Constitution; legislative, executive, and judicial processes; political parties, interest groups, and the relationships and obligations of citizens to their government(s). Fulfills the California state graduation and credential requirements for U.S. Constitution and California State and Local Government. May be substituted for GOVT 1, but may not be used as an elective toward the major.

GOVT 151.     Bureaucracy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Evaluation of the role and background of a professionalized bureaucracy with references to American national, state and local administrative systems as well as non-American administrative systems.

GOVT 152.     Political Psychology. 3 Units


Examines the ways in which political behavior is shaped by individual beliefs, personalities, cognitive patters, biases, and other psychological mechanisms. Students will engage with a wide range of research on topics such as cognitive styles, personality, obedience, psychological roots of terrorism, the psychology of ideology, and the role of emotion in politics. Cross Listed: PSYC 153

GOVT 153.     The American Presidency. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examines the development of the Presidency as an institution; sources and uses of presidential power in contemporary politics; the President's relationship with Congress and the bureaucracy; and current issues relating to the office.

GOVT 154.     Political Parties in America. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1


Examination and analysis of American political parties. An exploration of the nature and functions of political parties including party organization, electorate, and government. Topics include the various historical party systems, the two-party system, elections, and campaign financing. Includes discussion of the presidential nominating process.

GOVT 155.     The Legislative Process. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examination and analysis of the institutions, the people and the behavior that make up the legislative process. Considers the nature of representation and the role and impact of such factors as committee structure, political parties, interest groups, and others on public policy. Focus is on both the U.S. Congress and the California State Legislature.

GOVT 156.     Interest Groups. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Examination and analysis of interest groups in American political systems. The nature, role, formation, organization and activities of interest groups; how interest groups influence the public, political campaigns, public policy-making, and policy implementation. Representative interest groups will be studied.

GOVT 157.     Politics, Opinion, and Participation. 3 Units


How we learn and change our political beliefs, including the influence of media, religion and social standing. The various forms of political participation; who participates and who doesn't and why. The meaning and conduct of elections in the modern era.

GOVT 158.     Mass Media and American Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Focuses on the role the mass media plays in the political life of our democracy. Five primary topics are covered: the proper media role in a democracy; the relationship between the media, public opinion and agenda setting; the effects of media coverage on campaigns, elections, and voting; how elected officials influence and "spin" coverage; and the impact of media on policy-making. Students will develop critical analysis skills and emerge as more savvy media consumers and citizens.

GOVT 159A.     Campaigns and Elections. 3 Units


Exploration of American campaigns and elections. Topics include the electoral process, voting behavior, the role of political parties, the media, interest groups, and candidate and campaign strategies. Focus will be on contemporary/current campaigns and elections.

GOVT 159B.     American Politics Seminar: Problems in Democratic Institutions. 3 Units


Examines the concept of representation and how it functions in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures. In the first section different meanings of representation are discussed. In the second section interactions between legislators and their constituents are explored. Finally, the tradeoffs to different designs of representative institutions are studied.

GOVT 162.     American Film and Culture in the Nuclear Age. 3 Units


Explores the impact of the revolutionary change represented by the atomic bomb on forms of cultural response and expression in America. Attempts to analyze the bomb-culture relationship by reviewing important films, television programs, novels, essays, music and poetry that revealed, and helped shape, the hopes and anxieties that have characterized life in the nuclear age.

GOVT 163.     Introduction to Black Politics in the US. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), GE AREA D


Examines historically and currently the political life of black people in the U.S. Emphasis on understanding underlying conditions.

GOVT 164.     History of American Capitalism. 3 Units


Traces the development of the relationship between business and government in the U.S., especially in relation to state and federal regulations of those industries. Examines how individual entrepreneurs and regulators have contributed to the development of the modern American political economy. Cross Listed: HIST 164; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 165.     Politics of the Underrepresented. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent, and GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), GE AREA D, Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Examines the phenomenon of political underrepresentation in the U.S.A. It will identify significant affected groupings, examine the conditions which have resulted in such underrepresentation, evaluate the effects of underrepresentation on the lives of affected groups, and consider relevant political strategies. Emphasis on particular groups may vary with instructor.

GOVT 166.     Women and Politics in Contemporary America. 3 Units


Examination and evaluation of several approaches to women's equality in America today. A brief historical examination of the political aspects of the women's movement. A more thorough examination of the various factions; moderate, radical, and revolutionary. Such approaches as community projects, electoral politics, consciousness raising, separatism, and violent revolution will all be individually considered. Open to both sexes. Cross Listed: WOMS 166; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 167.     American Political Development. 3 Units


Focuses on key transformative sequences in American political history and their consequences. Topics include the nature of American political culture and its role in shaping U.S. political institutions and public policy; the process of government growth or "state building"; the role of political institutions in channeling societal demands and influencing public policy; the nature of American party systems or "regimes" and the electoral "realignments" that link them; and connections between long-term economic and political cycles.

GOVT 168.     Gay and Lesbian Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or GOVT 150.


Provides a broad overview of the politics of gay rights in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on gay rights at the state level (where the vast majority of policy is made) and major legal strategies and court rulings affecting the gay rights movement, since judiciaries have been the main venue for advancing gay rights arguments.

GOVT 169A.     Science, Technology, and Politics. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Social and political dimensions of science and technology. Examines how science and technology both shape politics and are shaped by politics. Considers the role of scientific advisors in government and society; dilemmas of expert authority and bias; relations between experts and non-experts; science and technology in popular culture; science and technology policy; implications of emerging technologies such as genetic engineering and the Internet for civil rights, moral values, and democracy.

GOVT 170.     Public Policy Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent, and (GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M/W).


Examines the policy development process in the U.S. by exploring the ideological predispositions of the American public, the analytical approaches applied to policy development and assessment, and the institutional and political environment in which policy is made. Typically, the understanding derived from this examination is applied to several policy issues of current interest.

GOVT 171.     Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 Units


Politics of human interaction with land, air and water. Political analysis of agenda setting, policy formation and administration (national, state, and local) of environmental programs. Focus on contemporary issues such as energy alternatives, management of toxics, land development, and pollution control. Cross Listed: ENVS 171; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 180.     California State and Local Government. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: California State & Local Government, GE AREA D


California state, city and county politics and government. Comparisons with governments in other states. Meets State requirements in California State and Local Governments. Permits students who have fulfilled U.S. Constitution requirement in another state to meet graduation requirements for California State and Local Governments.

GOVT 181.     Comparative State Government. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or GOVT 150.


Examines the political diversity of the fifty states, with special attention paid to variations in state governing institutions. Topics covered include legislatures, governors, judiciaries, political parties, interest groups, elections, direct democracy, and state budget procedures.

GOVT 182A.     Sem Calif Govt+Politics. 3 Units


Open to selected students from each of the 20 CSU campuses, the Sacramento Semester program provides students with an opportunity to spend the semester studying and working directly in California State government. Participating students work as interns at the State Capitol for 25 or more hours each week. Interns are placed in legislators' offices, with legislative committees, party caucuses, lobbyists and interest groups, or in various executive, administrative, and judicial agencies. In addition to the internships, students participate in an academic seminar, California Government and Politics. The seminars frequently include as resource persons individuals who work in key policy-making positions in the state government.

GOVT 182B.     Sem Calif Govt+Politics. 3 Units


Open to selected students from each of the 20 CSU campuses, the Sacramento Semester program provides students with an opportunity to spend the semester studying and working directly in California State government. Participating students work as interns at the State Capitol for 25 or more hours each week. Interns are placed in legislators' offices, with legislative committees, party caucuses, lobbyists and interest groups, or in various executive, administrative, and judicial agencies. In addition to the internships, students participate in an academic seminar, California Government and Politics. The seminars frequently include as resource persons individuals who work in key policy-making positions in the state government.

GOVT 184.     Introduction to Urban Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent.


Problems of urban areas and proposed solutions; politics and government. May be offered as lecture-discussion class or as a seminar. Field study may be required.

GOVT 195A.     Internship. 1 - 6 Units


Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09, WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109 M/W. Minimum GPA of 2.5 (both in the major and overall).

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 195B.     Internship Sacramento Semester. 1 - 6 Units


Prerequisite: Minimum GPA of 2.5 (both in the major and overall).

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 195D.     Internship - Washington DC. 6 Units


Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09, WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109 M/W.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 196X.     Odyssey Mentors. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of two upper division Government courses and instructor permission.


Provides individualized learning opportunities (1-3 units per semester) for engaging in mentoring along with elective activities such as tutoring, assisting faculty with research, event planning and other activities of a comparable nature. Students should be upper division students or graduate students.

Note: Units may not be applied towards unit requirement of the Government major, Government IR and Government/Journalism; May be repeated once for credit.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 198A.     Odyssey Peer Advisers. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission


Provides individualized learning opportunities (1-3 units per semester) for engaging in peer advising along with elective activities such as tutoring, assisting faculty with research, event planning and other activities of a comparable nature. Students should be upper division students or graduate students. The units may not be applied towards unit requirement of the Government major, Government IR and Government/Journalism.

Note: This course may be repeated up to a total of six units.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 198B.     Peer Advising by Odyssey. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission


Provides opportunity for lower division students, students on probation, and newly declared majors to be mentored by more advanced upper division students or graduate students. This peer advising will help students meet academic deadlines, achieve academic success, become engaged in campus activities and integrated into the Government Department. Units may not be applied towards unit requirement of the Government major, Government IR and Government/Journalism

Note: This course may be repeated one time only for unit credit.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 199.     Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GOVT 1 or equivalent, and nine units upper division government courses.


Permits a student to pursue study and research in an area not otherwise available through the regular curriculum. Open only to upper division Government majors with at least a 3.0 GPA in the major.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 200.     Method and Scope in Political Science. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): STAT 1 or its equivalent.


Introduction to the philosophy of science, and the scope and methods of empirical research in political, social and policy science. In the area of philosophy of science, focuses on the logic of scientific inquiry, theory testing and confirmation and causal explanation. In the area of scope and methods, critically examines the scientific merits of several competing approaches to the study of politics and policy, as well as some of the major methodological controversies and debates in the literature.

GOVT 210.     Political Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


Historical and social roots, democratic or authoritarian ideologies; the conflict of ideologies; philosophic approaches.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator.

GOVT 213.     Special Topics in American Political Thought. 3 Units


A class examining the historical and philosophical discourse in America on central topics of debate, such as the meaning of citizenship, civil society, democracy, federalism, religion, and civil rights open to both advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Note: Undergraduates are strongly encouraged to have completed GOVT 113 or an equivalent course.

GOVT 218.     Special Topics in International Political Thought. 3 Units


A class examining the philosophical underpinnings and the theatrical problems of central concepts and problems in international relations, including human rights, intercultural dialogue, problems of just war and international justice through a study of historical and contemporary texts open to both advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Note: Undergraduates are strongly encouraged to have completed GOVT 118 or an equivalent course.

GOVT 219.     Specialized Studies in Political Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.


Makes it possible for political theory students to deal with questions which theorists have asked, and to attempt to answer such questions for themselves.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator.

GOVT 230.     Theories of International Relations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


Examination of the theory and practice of international relations including such subfields as international law, international organization, foreign policy and national security policy.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator. Cross Listed: IA 210; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 236.     Seminar in International Political Economy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


This seminar is a graduate-level introduction to the theory and substance of international political economy (IPE). It examines the various theoretical approaches to IPE; considers the role of trade, money, and finance in the international political economy; analyzes the pattern and structure of global production, with an emphasis on multinational corporations; surveys international development issues, including Third World economic development strategies, the debt crises, structural adjustment, and economies in transition; and investigates the politics of globalization. Cross Listed: IA 221; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 239.     Globalization and International Relations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in international relations or instructor permission.


Introduction to the theories and substance of globalization. It examines alternative theories of globalization; considers globalization's political impact on the territorial state, regionalism, the welfare state, the military, immigration, and the environment; investigates the politics of the anti-globalization backlash; and concludes with an assessment of the future political trends of globalization. Cross Listed: IA 230; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 240.     Comparative Government and Politics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced course in the field.


Advanced study of some of the world's governmental and political systems. May focus on single countries, groups of countries or general categories of systems. Considers theoretical concept and methodology.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator. Cross Listed: IA 222; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 249A.     Middle East Politics and the United States. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.


Graduate introduction to politics and governments of the Middle East and the impact of the United States foreign policy in the region. Relies on a comparative frame to tease out the causes of intrastate and interstate conflicts in the region, as well as the effects of the American foreign policy on the contemporary political trends in the Middle East, including those relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamic political resurgence, and terrorism.

GOVT 250.     Basic Issues of American Government. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): An upper division course in the field and/or instructor permission.


Exploration in-depth of topics such as federalism, executive-legislative relationships, problems of representation, government reorganization, congressional reform, the electoral process.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator.

GOVT 270.     Political Behavior and Political Processes: California and Beyond. 3 Units


Course will explore public opinion, voting behavior, representation and political psychology with special focus on California.

Note: Undergraduates may take the course with instructor permission.

GOVT 280.     California Politics. 3 Units


Advanced study of California's state and local governments, with emphasis on political history, political institutions, and the role of direct democracy on the state's government, budget and politics. Demographic and geographic elements will be scrutinized through a political focus. California's policy and political process will also be examined, as well as discussion of various political reforms.

Note: Undergraduates may take the course with instructor permission. Prerquisite: Must be an unclassified Graduate or a Masters degree student in Government, Public Policy & Administration or Internationl Affairs

GOVT 281.     Comparative State Government. 3 Units


Examines state political institutions and processes. Special attention will be paid to how the political variation among the states shapes processes and outcomes. Topics covered will include governors, legislatures, interest groups, public opinion, political parties, and elections.

GOVT 284.     Urban Politics. 3 Units


In-depth exploration of the socio-economic problems of urban and metropolitan areas and an evaluation of proposed political and governmental solutions.

Note: May be repeated for credit with permission of Graduate Coordinator. Cross Listed: PPA 284; only one may be counted for credit.

GOVT 293A.     Senate Fellows Introductory Seminar. 3 Units


Critical analysis and examination of the operation of the State Capitol and the larger political environment of political parties, interest groups, and public opinion.

Note: Open only to students admitted to the California Senate Fellows Program.

GOVT 293B.     Senate Fellows Policy Seminar. 3 Units


Seminar will analyze procedural issues and public policy questions within the State Senate, legislature, and contemporary California politics.

Note: Open only to students admitted to the California Senate Fellows Program.

GOVT 294A.     Assembly Fellows Introductory Seminar. 3 Units


Critical examination of state and local governmental institutions and processes. Seminar will impart an advanced understanding of the structures and processes of California's political institutions, government and legislature.

Note: Open only to students admitted to the Jesse M. Unruh Assembly Fellowship Program.

GOVT 294B.     Assembly Fellows Policy Seminar. 3 Units


Seminar focuses on current California policy issues and the lawmaking process.

Note: Open only to students admitted to the Jesse M. Unruh Assembly Fellowship Program.

GOVT 295.     Government Internship. 1 - 6 Units


Supervised work experience in an approved legislative or administrative office at some level of local or state government, or in a politically-related organization that is concerned with government. Supervision is provided by the faculty instructor and responsible officials in the work situation.

Note: Open to all graduate students, subject to instructor permission. No more than 3 units of GOVT 295 may be counted toward the Master's degree.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 299.     Independent Study. 1 - 3 Units


For advanced graduate students who have demonstrated their ability to carry on advanced, independent research. Permits a student to pursue study and research in an area not otherwise available through the regular curriculum. Student must be advanced to candidacy.

Credit/No Credit

GOVT 500.     Culminating Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy.


Should be taken after completion of all other requirements for the degree. Students may choose from the following options, which they must declare when they advance to candidacy: Thesis, Project, or Comprehensive Examination.