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PHIL 2. Ethics. Examination of the concepts of morality, obligation, human rights and the good life. Competing theories about the foundations of morality will be investigated. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 4. Critical Thinking. Study of the basic skills of good reasoning needed for the intelligent and responsible conduct of life. Topics include: argument structure and identification, validity and strength of arguments, common fallacies of reasoning, use and abuse of language in reasoning, principles of fair play in argumentation. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 6. Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge, World and Self. Representative selection of philosophical problems will be explored in areas such as knowledge, reality, religion, science, politics, art and morals. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 21. First Year Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. Introduction to the nature and possible meanings of higher education, and the functions and resources of the University. Designed to help students develop and exercise fundamental academic success strategies and to improve their basic learning skills. Students have the opportunity to interact with fellow classmates and the seminar leader to build a community of academic support and personal support. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 26. History of Philosophy. Introduction to the history of philosophy, emphasizing such themes as the foundations of knowledge, the nature of reality, the basis of a good life and a just society, the existence of God, and the nature of self, and tracing the development of these themes from antiquity to the modern period. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 27. History of Early Modern Philosophy. Examines the major developments in Western philosophy after the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the period from Descartes to Kant. Attention will be paid to the general historical and cultural setting within which the philosophical theories developed. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 60. Symbolic Logic I. Introduction to deductive logic. Topics include: basic concepts of deductive logic; techniques of formal proof in propositional and predicate logic. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 61. Inductive Logic. Introduction to inductive logic and the problem of decision under uncertainty. Topics include: the nature of inductive rationality, philosophical theories of induction and probability, cognitive biases and common errors in inductive reasoning, and philosophical problems in defining risk, rational agency, and the expected value of an action. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 100. Ethics and Personal Values. Moral concerns of everyday life stressing such features of moral character as right and wrong conduct, virtue and vice, the emotions, attitudes, and personal relationships. Emphasis is on analytical and critical discussion of philosophical theories and competing viewpoints. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 101. Ethics and Social Issues. Moral controversies that divide society today, such as abortion, the death penalty, affirmative action, sexism, war and peace. Emphasis is on identifying the relevant values and moral principles underlying competing views and subjecting them to rational assessment. Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 102. Professional and Public Service Ethics. Prepares students planning careers in professional practice or public service to identify, understand, and resolve ethical problems. Includes examinations of (i) ethical theory, rights and duties, virtue ethics, utilitarian ethics, social contract theory, and role morality; (ii) the philosophical underpinnings of professional codes of conduct, regulations, and norms of professional and public service practices; (iii) moral reasoning and argumentation; (iv) the relation between ethical judgement and action; (v) the relation between professional practice, public service, and democratic principles. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 103. Business and Computer Ethics. Analytical treatment of controversial moral issues which emerge in the business world, e.g., affirmative action, corporate responsibility, the global economy, industry and environmental damage, social effects of advertising, the computer threat to personal privacy, ownership of computer programs. Discussion will focus on basic moral principles and concepts relevant to these issues. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 104. Bioethics. Ethical dilemmas faced by professionals and patients in the field of medicine, e.g., patient self-determination and informed consent, discrimination in health care, euthanasia, abortion, surrogate motherhood, genetic modification, and rights to health care. Emphasis is on the well-reasoned application of general moral principles to practical medical decisions. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 105. Science and Human Values. Examination of the values implicit in a scientific culture and the problems that arise as a commitment to the development of scientific knowledge and technology. These problems include: distinguishing good scientific practice from bad; the intrinsic value of scientific knowledge independent of its benefits in application; the proper and improper applications of scientific knowledge. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 112. History Of Ethics. Investigation of the main approaches to ethics in Western moral philosophy. Emphasis on Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant and Mill. Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 115. Philosophy In Literature. Study of selected works of fiction which focus on philosophically controversial questions, e.g., basic moral dilemmas, the meaning of life, alienation, nihilism, the existence of God. Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 117. Existentialism. Study of the problem of the existing individual, or inner self -- most especially the problem of choice in the context of radical freedom and finitude. Particular attention will be paid to the philosophical writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre, through some major literary works of these figures and others (Camus, Dostoevsky) will also be considered. Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 122. Political Philosophy. A philosophical examination of the individual, the community, and rights; the conflict between individual rights and the common good; various conceptions of justice, equality, liberty and the public good; and the relationship of politics to ethics, economics, law; war and peace. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 123. Philosophy and Feminism. Study of feminist perspectives on important philosophical questions. Examples of the questions treated are: mind-body dualism; reason and emotion; the fact/value distinction; the nature of the public and private realms; equal rights; and whether knowledge is intrinsically "gendered." Different feminist perspectives will be considered and compared with traditional approaches to these questions. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 125. Philosophy Of Science. Study of the philosophical problems that arise in the sciences: the nature of scientific reasoning, the limits and styles of explanation, identifying pseudoscience, values in science, unity and diversity of the sciences, and science's impact on our world view. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 126. The Meanings Of Evolution. Study of the philosophical basis of the biological sciences: the power and limits of evolution as a scientific explanation; Darwinism, its refinements, alternatives and critics; the origin and nature of life; the scope of evolution as an explanation, including critical investigations of evolutionary psychology and sociobiology. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 127. History of Ancient Philosophy. Examination of the origins of Western philosophy, with emphasis on the works of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Prerequisite: 3 units in Philosophy. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 128. History of Modern Philosophy. Examination of the major developments in Western philosophy after the Middle Ages with emphasis on the period from Descartes to Kant. Prerequisite: 3 units in Philosophy. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 131. Philosophy Of Religion. Introduction to philosophical theology, the philosophical study of religious assertions, arguments, and beliefs: the existence and nature of God; the rationality of religious belief; the relation of faith to reason; the problem of evil; immortality and resurrection; the possibility of miracles; the meaning of religious language. Includes both traditional and contemporary approaches. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 136. Philosophy Of Art. Inquiry into the nature of art, beauty and criticism, with critical consideration of representative theories. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 145A. Chinese Philosophy. Survey of the major philosophical traditions of China and Japan, focusing on concepts of nature, man, society, freedom and knowledge. Special attention will be given to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and recent philosophical movements. Taught alternate semesters with PHIL 145B. Prerequisite: GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 145B. Philosophies Of India. Survey of the major schools of Indian philosophical development. The emphasis will be on the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, with consideration given to competing notions of the self, consciousness, the origin of human suffering, and the possibility of transcendence. Note: Taught alternate semesters with PHIL 145A. GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 152. Recent Ethical Theory. Major topics in ethical theory with attention to their contemporary formulation, including such topics as utilitarianism vs. rights-based theories and the dispute over the objectivity of ethics. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 153. Philosophy Of Mind. Rival theories of the nature of the mind and mental activity, including dualism, materialism, functionalism. Difficulties in achieving a theoretical understanding of familiar psychological concepts such as belief, sensation, emotion, intention. Prerequisite: 3 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 154. Philosophy Of Language. Study of philosophical issues concerning language: theories of the nature of linguistic meaning, in particular those involving the concepts of sense, reference, truth conditions, intention, convention, speech act, and force. Topics include the relation between meaning and reference to objects, and between meaning and mental processes. Emphasis on contemporary views, including views on the promise of a theory of language to shed light on fundamental philosophical problems in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 155. Philosophy Of Law. Theories of the nature of law, e.g., natural law, legal positivism, legal realism. Selected controversies in contemporary law will also be studied, such as the justification of punishment, the legislation of morality, judicial activism vs. judicial restraint. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 160. Symbolic Logic II. Further study of deductive logic. Topics include: principles of inference for quantified predicate logic; connectives; quantifiers; relations; sets; modality; properties of formal logical systems, e.g. consistency and completeness; and interpretations of deductive systems in mathematics, science, and ordinary language. Prerequisite: MATH 31, PHIL 60, or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 176. Twentieth Century Anglo-American Philosophy. Rise of the analytic tradition in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy represents a turn toward common sense, science, language, logic and rigor. Readings will cover the philosophical movements of common sense, logical atomism, logical positivism, ordinary language philosophy and more recent analytical philosophy. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 180. Knowledge and Understanding. Examines the concept of knowledge. Representative topics include: the role of sense perception and memory, the importance of certainty, the justification of belief, philosophical skepticism, the concept of truth and the nature of philosophical inquiry. Emphasis is on contemporary formulations. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 181. Metaphysics. Examines arguments concerning the nature of reality. Representative topics include: substance, space, time, God, free will, determinism, identity, universals. Emphasis is on contemporary formulations. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 189. Senior Seminar. A required capstone experience in the philosophy major. The course involves: completion of a senior essay under direction of a faculty member; preparation for knowledge and skills examination; submission of written critiques for three public events in philosophy; completion of departmental assessment questionnaire. Prerequisite: 12 upper-division units in Philosophy. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 1.0
PHIL 190K. Seminar: Kant's Critical Philosophy. Study of important works of Immanuel Kant. Examination of Kant's contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics and consider his analyses of the concepts of space, time, self, God, freedom, immortality, causation, reality, and knowledge. Also, Kant's reactions to his rationalist and empiricist predecessors, and this impact on contemporary philosophy will be considered. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 190M. Seminar: Philosophical Thought of John Stuart Mill. Intensive study of the philosophical writings of John Stuart Mill, with particular attention to his ethical and political work. Addresses the consistency of Mill's utilitarian ethics as applied to pressing social, legal, political, and economic issues of the 19th century (some of which remain to this day). These include a defense of the emancipation of women, the nature of economic justice in industrial society, a defence of individual liberty, and the centrality of human flourishing to a justly ordered society. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 190P. Seminar: Plato. Intensive study of a selection of Plato's dialogues, focusing on topics that relate to Socrates' revolutionary approach to ethical inquiry. These topics include: the soul, virtue as an intellectual skill, the good life, the Forms, and the structure of knowledge. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192A. Atheism: Arguments, Objections, and Responses. Examines the arguments, concepts, objections, and responses surrounding philosophical atheism. Addresses atheism in the context of at least four of the following: evil, miracles, historical evidence for theism, faith, divine hiddenness, theodicies, divine attributes, science, morality, agnosticism, and naturalized accounts of belief. Prerequisite: 6 units in Philosophy or instructor permission. PHIL 131 strongly encouraged. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192D. Space and Time. Introduction to significant philosophical issues involving space and time. An investigation into the current state of these issues. Note: No background or work in mathematics or physics is required. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Cross-listed: LIBA 205; only one may be counted for credit. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192E. Environmental Philosophy. Will address the following topics: Does the natural world (ecosystems, species, etc.) have only instrumental value for humans, or intrinsic value? How should natural resources be valued, by the market? Cost/benefit analysis? The "takings" issues: What in nature should be private, what public? Institutional problems: Can a sustainable society/planet also be just? Prerequisite: 6 units in Philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192I. Infinity. Examines the concept of infinity as understood from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on philosophical, cultural, and mathematical significance. Topics covered include: physical infinities, temporal infinities, spatial infinities, infinitesimals, the absolute infinite, transfinite numbers paradoxes of infinity, the continuum, the one and the many, the comprehensibility of the infinite, implications for science and the philosophies of mind, religion, and metaphysics. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192J. Seminar: Contemporary Theories of Justice. Examines the concept of justice in its contemporary usage, in light of the historical roots of the concept; considers several principal theoretical models of justice and the just society, including libertarian, liberal, contractarian, communitarian, and feminist variations. Related concepts include, equality, freedom, democracy, oppression, discrimination, and conflict. Prerequisite: 6 units in Philosophy or instructor permission Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192M. Seminar on Meaning and Reference. Advanced topics in the philosophy of language. Topics include: sense and reference, meaning and force, intentions vs. conventions, conditions for sameness of sense, conditions for successful reference, propositional content, indexical and demonstrative reference, and the semantics of propositional attitude and perceptual reports. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192N. Seminar: Naturalism. Examines the significance of naturalism for the history of philosophy and at least four of the following subject areas: ethics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, philosophy of law, philosophy of history, social and political philosophy, metaphysics, and logic. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 192P. Seminar on the Problem of Evil. An analysis of the aspects of the problem of evil: why does an all powerful and good God allow so much pointless suffering? This course addresses the logical and inductive problems and a variety of the solutions that have been influential in philosophy and Theology. Prerequisite: PHIL 131 or 6 units of Philosophy, or instructor permission. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 195. Philosophy Internship. Supervised work experience in an approved office or organization where significant philosophical issues are raised. The student must write regular reports on these issues. Supervision is provided by the faculty instructor and a managing official in the work situation. Open to majors only. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Graded: Credit / No Credit. Units: 1.0 - 3.0.
PHIL 196. Experimental Offerings in Philosophy. Experimental offerings will be scheduled as needed. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 3.0
PHIL 197. Honors Thesis. Capstone seminar for Honors Program students in Philosophy major. Student will propose, research, write, and present an honors thesis; student will also provide comments and criticism of other honors theses. Prerequisite: Admission into Philosophy Department Honors Concentration. Graded: Graded Student. Units: 1.0
PHIL 199. Special Problems. Special projects calling for independent philosophical investigation under the supervision of an individual faculty member. Note: Requires prior approval of the faculty member under whom work is to be conducted. Graded: Graded (CR/NC Available). Units: 1.0 - 3.0.
PHIL 299. Special Problems. Special projects calling for independent philosophical investigation under the supervision of an individual faculty member. Note: Requires graduate status and prior approval of the faculty member under whom work is to be conducted. Graded: Graded (CR/NC Available). Units: 1.0 - 3.0.