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University Catalog

GENERAL EDUCATION

Course Requirements:

Area A: Basic Subjects
Area B: The Physical Universe and Its Life Forms
Area C: The Arts & Humanities
Area D: The Individual & Society
Area E: Understanding Personal Development

Additional Graduation Requirements

American Institutions
Race & Ethnicity in American Society
Writing Intensive

GE Policies
Overlap Between General Education and Majors/Minors (Fall 1992 and Later)
Transfer Students

One of the principles on which a modern university rests is the assumption that there is an important difference between learning to make a living and building the foundation for a life. While the first goal is important, the second is fundamental.

In focusing on the students’ development as whole or “educated” people, a university distinguishes itself from a trade school. The goal of a university education is not simply the acquisition and application of knowledge, but the creation of people who firmly grasp the worth of clear thinking and know how to do it; who understand and appreciate the differences between peoples and cultures as well as their similarities; who have a sense of history and social forces; who can express thought clearly and have quantitative ability; who know something about the arts as well as how to enjoy them; who can talk and think intelligently about the physical and life sciences, the humanities, and literature; and, above all, who have the desire and capability for learning. This goal is why a university degree is so highly valued by individuals, employers, and the community at large.

The Sacramento State General Education Program is designed to educate in this holistic sense. Thus, it is not simply a series of courses to complete or hoops for students to jump through as they complete the courses in their major. Rather, general education lies at the heart of what a university education is all about.

Therefore students should carefully select courses and actively seek subject areas that are new and may challenge their world views or cherished assumptions and offer new experiences, such as inquiry-based or community-based learning. In short, students should not take the easy way out. This is their opportunity to lay the foundation for the rest of their lives, and to define themselves as educated members of the human community. Their time at the university is precious and the General Education Program has been designed to help them begin the process of becoming truly educated people. In deciding to pursue a university degree, they have chosen well and should make the best use of the opportunities open to them.

Objectives

Upon completion of the General Education Program requirements, students will be expected to:

• read, write, and understand relatively complex and sophisticated English prose;
• construct a non-fallacious verbal argument, recognize fallacious arguments, and follow the verbal arguments of others;
• find and use common information resources, engage in specialized library research, use computers, and seek out appropriate expert opinion and advice; and
• use mathematical ideas to accomplish a variety of tasks.

In addition to these basic skills, courses in the sciences, arts, humanities, and social sciences have been selected to provide students with:

• an understanding of the workings of the physical universe, which will refine their science-based conceptual problem solving skills and develop a first-hand acquaintance with the methods of science, including a general understanding of hypothesis formation and theory-testing;
• knowledge of current theories about the origins and varieties of life on this planet, focusing on the basic principles of life processes, the interdependence of creatures in ecological systems, and the effects of changes in the environment;
• an exposure to the historical and cultural influences that have played significant roles in the evolution of the values, beliefs, and ideas of Western and non-Western societies, through the study of significant literary, philosophical, and artistic works;
• a familiarity with the theories and methods of the social sciences in order to enhance their understandings of the major institutions in our society, and the roles that both individuals and groups play in shaping experience;
• perspectives on people from various cultures and backgrounds, including awareness of the contributions of non-Western cultures, women, and ethnic groups to the rich diversity of human activity; and
• an understanding of the current theories and methods used to expand our knowledge of the processes of mental and physical development throughout the human life cycle.

Sacramento State General Education courses are designed, selected, and approved by the faculty to meet these program objectives. Students will benefit from consultation with the Academic Advising Center or advisors in their major departments in planning their General Education course choices. Students may search the online Schedule of Classes by Area or other specification(s) for currently available GE courses.

Course Requirements

The following courses have been approved to meet the 48-unit General Education pattern required of Sacramento State students. At least 9 units must be in upper division GE courses (100-199) taken after you complete 60 units of coursework. Enrollment in upper division GE courses is limited to students who have completed Areas A1, A2, A3, and have taken at least 45 units (not limited to GE classes). At least nine units of GE must be taken in residence (i.e., at Sacramento State). In addition, a second semester composition course and demonstration of proficiency in a foreign language are required for graduation. (See GE requirements for a description of these requirements.) Students must choose their General Education classes from the Areas and classes listed below:

Note: Numbers contained in parenthesis before each course indicate each courses individual unit value.

Area A: Basic Subjects (9 units)
These requirements must be completed before enrollment in upper division GE courses. A grade of "C-" or better is required in all courses taken in Area A.

Area A1: Oral Communication(3 units)

(3) COMS 4 Introduction to Public Speaking
(3) COMS 5 The Communication Experience

Area A2: Written Communication (3 units)

(3) ENGL 5 Accelerated Academic Literacies
(3) ENGL 5M Accelerated Academic Literacies - Multilingual
(3) ENGL 11 Academic Literacies II (Prerequisite: ENGL 10 Academic Literacies I)
(3) ENGL 11M Academic Literacies II - Multilingual (Prerequisite: ENGL 10M Academic Literacies I - Multilingual)

Area A3: Critical Thinking (3 units)

(3) ANTH 4 Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking
(3) COMS 2 Argumentation
(3) EDTE 10 Critical Thinking and the Educated Person
(3) EDTE 10H Critical Thinking and the Educated Person: Honors
(3) ENVS 11 Environmental Issues and Critical Thinking
(3) JOUR 50 Mass Media and Critical Thinking
(3) PHIL 4 Critical Thinking
(3) PHYS 30 Science and Pseudo Science
(3) SOC 8 Sense and Nonsense in Social Issues and Research

Area B: The Physical Universe and Its Life Forms (12 units)
At least 3 units must be taken in each of Areas B1, B2 and B4. At least one course with a laboratory component must be taken in Area B1 or B2. Lab courses in area B1 or B2 are designated with a (°) and satisfy Area B3.

Area B1: Physical Science (3 units)

(3) ASTR 4A Introduction to the Solar System
(3) ASTR 4B Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology
(3) ASTR 4C Introduction to Astrobiology
(1) ASTR 6° Astronomical Observation Lab
(5) CHEM 1A° General Chemistry I
(5) CHEM 5° Chemistry for Nurses
(5) CHEM 6A° Introduction to General Chemistry
(3) GEOG 1 Physical Geography: The Distribution of Natural Phenomena
(3) GEOG 5 Violent Weather/Changing Atmosphere
(1) GEOG 11° Physical Geography Lab
(4) GEOL 5° Geology of Mexico
(3) GEOL 7 Natural Disasters
(3) GEOL 8 Earth Science
(1) GEOL 8L° Earth Science Lab
(3) GEOL 10 Physical Geology
(1) GEOL 10L° Physical Geology Lab
(4) PHYS 5A° General Physics - Mech, Heat, and Sound
(3) PHYS 10 Physics in Our World
(4) PHYS 11A° General Physics: Mechanics

Area B2: Life Forms (3 units)

(3) ANTH 1 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
(1) ANTH 1A° Physical Anthropology Lab
(5) BIO 1° Biodiversity, Evolution, and Ecology
(4) BIO 7° Introduction to the Science of Biology
(3) BIO 9 Our Living World: Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior
(3) BIO 10 Basic Biological Concepts
(1) BIO 15L° Laboratory Investigations in Biology
(3) BIO 20 Biology: A Human Perspective
(3) ENVS 10 Environmental Science

Area B3: Lab
A course designated by the symbol (°) is required from Area B1 or B2 or Physical Science or Life Forms laboratory courses in B5 designated by the symbol (°).

Area B4: Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (3 units)
Completion of the ELM is a prerequisite for courses in this Area. In addition, passage of course-based diagnostic exams is required. A grade of "C-" or better is required in all courses taken in Area B4.

(3) MATH 1 Mathematical Reasoning
(3) MATH 15H Honors Mathematical Reasoning
(3) MATH 17 Exploration, Conjecture and Proof in Math
(3) MATH 24 Modern Business Mathematics
(3) MATH 26A Calculus I for the Social and Life Sciences
(3) MATH 26B Calculus II for the Social and Life Sciences
(4) MATH 29 Pre-calculus Mathematics
(4) MATH 30 Calculus I
(4) MATH 31 Calculus II
(3) MATH 35 Introduction to Linear Algebra
(3) STAT 1 Introduction to Statistics
(4) STAT 50 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
(3) STAT 96A & (3) STAT 96B Introductory Statistics with Development Mathematics

Area B5: Further Studies in Physical Science, Life Forms, and Quantitative Reasoning
Choose a course from this area or another from B1, B2, or B4 to total 12 units in Area B. Approved Lab courses in B5 designated by the symbol (°) may be used in Area B3.

Lower Division:

(3) ANTH 15 World Prehistory and the Evolution of Modern Humanity
(3) ANTH 17 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
(5) CHEM 1B° General Chemistry II
(5) CHEM 6B° Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
(3) CSC 1 Introduction to Computer Science
(3) CSC 10 Introduction to Programming Logic
(3) EDUC 18 Mathematical Practices Across Cultures
(3) GEOL 12 Historical Geology
(3) PHIL 60 Deductive Logic I

Upper Division:

(3) ASTR 131* The Solar System and Space Exploration
(3) ASTR 132* Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology
(3) CHDV 143* Mind and Brain in Developmental Context
(3) FACS 112* Current Topics in Nutritional Science
(3) FACS 113 Nutrition and Metabolism
(3) GEOG 111 Elements of Meteorology
(3) GEOG 113 Climate
(3) GEOG 115 Biogeography
(3) GEOG 116 Global Climate Change
(3) GEOL 130 Oceanography
(3) HIST/PHSC 107 History of the Physical Sciences
(3) KINS 150 Exercise and Sport Physiology
(3) NURS 168 The Brain and Gender-Related Differences
(3) PHIL 125 Philosophy of Science

Area C: The Arts & Humanities (12 units)

At least 3 units must be taken from Areas C1 (ARTS) and C2 (HUMANITIES).

Area C1: Arts (3 units minimum to 9 units)

Lower Division:

(3) ART 1A Art in the Western World: From Stone Age to End of Middle Ages
(3) ART 1B Art in the Western World: Art in the Western World: From Renaissance to Baroque
(3) ART 1C Modern and Contemporary Art: Rococo
(3) ART 3A Traditional Asian Art
(3) ART 3B Modern and Contemporary Asian Art
(3) ART 5 Native American Art
(3) ART 7 Introduction to Art and Visual Culture
(3) ART 20A Beginning Drawing
(3) ART 22 Beginning Painting
(3) ART 24 Beginning Watercolor
(3) ART 70 Form, Space, and Vision
(3) ART 74 Beginning Jewelry
(3) ART 75 Beginning Metalsmithing
(3) ART 86 Clay Sculpture
(3) ART 88 Beginning Sculpture
(3) INTD 20 Design
(3) MUSC 8 Basic Music
(3) MUSC 9 Music in World Cultures
(3) MUSC 10A Survey of Music Literature
(3) MUSC 10B Survey of Music Literature
(3) MUSC 18 Music Appreciation
(3) THEA 1 Introduction to the Theatre
(3) THEA 2 History of the Theatre: Ancient to Renaissance
(3) THEA 3 Theatre History After 1660
(3) THEA 5 Aesthetics of Theatre and Film
(3) THEA 9 Appreciation of Acting

Upper Division

(3) ALS 151 The Studio: Explorations in Arts and Letters
(3) ART 111* Latin American and Latino Art History
(3) ART 117A Art of India and Southeast Asia
(3) ART 117B Art of China and Japan
(3) ASIA/HIST 140* Modern East Asian Cinema
(3) DNCE 130 Appreciation and History of Dance
(3) DNCE 131+ Dance Cultures of America
(3) DNCE 132+ African and Caribbean Dance
(3) ENGL 130M* Art of Autobiography
(3) ENGL 140M* Modern British Drama, 1889 to Present
(3) ENGL 141A* The Essential Shakespeare
(3) ENGL 150J 20th Century American Drama
(3) ENGL 191A Masterpieces of Cinema
(3) HRS 180 The Film
(3) HRS 181 Contemporary Issues in Film
(3) ITAL 104A Introduction to Italian Cinema I
(3) MUSC 118B American Popular Music: Jazz History
(3) MUSC 118C History of Rock Music
(3) MUSC 119A World Music: Asia
(3) MUSC 119B World Music: Africa
(3) MUSC 119C World Music: Latin America
(3) MUSC 127* The American Musical Theatre
(3) MUSC 129* American Society and its Music
(3) PHIL 136 Philosophy of Art
(3) THEA 115A+ Multicultural Puppetry
(3) THEA 140 Black Drama in the African Diaspora
(3) THEA/WOMS 144+ Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity
(3) THEA 170* African American Theatre and Culture
(3) THEA 173 Contemporary Chicano/Latino Theatre: Themes and Performance 1965-Present
(3) THEA 174+ Multicultural Perspectives in American Theatre
(3) THEA 175+ Multicultural Perspectives in American Film
(3) WOMS 146 Women in Art

Area C2: Humanities (3 units minimum to 9 units)

Lower Division

(3) ANTH 13 Magic, Witchcraft & Religion
(3) ANTH 16 Comparative Early Civilizations
(5) CHIN 1B Elementary Mandarin
(3) DEAF 52 American Sign Language 2
(3) ENGL 40A Introduction to British Literature I
(3) ENGL 40B Introduction to British Literature II
(3) ENGL 50A Introduction to American Literature I
(3) ENGL 50B Introduction to American Literature II
(3) ENGL 65 Introduction to World Literature in English
(3) ENGL 90A Modern Short Plays
(4) FREN 1B Elementary French
(4) FREN 2A Intermediate French
(4) GERM 1B Elementary German
(3) GOVT 10 The Meaning of Government: An Intro to Political Ideas
(3) HIST 4 Survey of Early Western Civilization
(3) HIST 5 Survey of Modern Western Civilization
(3) HIST 6 Asian Civilization
(3) HIST 7 History of African Civilization
(3) HIST 8 History of Islamic Civilization
(3) HIST 50 World Civilization: Beginnings to 1600
(3) HIST 50H Honors World Civilization I: Beginnings to 1600
(3) HIST 51 World Civilization: 1600 to the Present
(3) HIST 51H Honors World Civilization II: 1600 to the Present
(3) HRS 10 Arts and Ideas of the West: Ancient to Medieval
(3) HRS 11 Arts and Ideas of the West: Renaissance to Modern
(3) HRS 70 Arts and Ideas of Asia: Ancient to Medieval
(3) HRS 71 Arts and Ideas of Asia: Medieval to Modern
(4) ITAL 1B Elementary Italian
(5) JAPN 1B Elementary Japanese
(3) PHIL 2 Ethics
(3) PHIL 6 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge, World and Self
(3) PHIL 26 History of Philosophy
(3) PHIL 27 History of Early Modern Philosophy
(4) PUNJ 1B Elementary Punjabi
(5) RUSS 1B Elementary Russian
(4) SPAN 1B Elementary Spanish

Upper Division

(3) ANTH 121 Archeology of Mexico
(3) ANTH 134 Japanese Culture and Society
(3) ANTH 166 Rise of Religious Cults
(3) ANTH/HRS 170* The Religious Landscape of the Sacramento Valley
(3) CHDV 141 History of Childhood: Intl & Interdisciplinary Perspectives
(3) CHIN 120 Chinese Civilization
(3) ECON 112 European Economic History
(3) EDUC 121*+ Multicultural Children's Literature
(3) ENGL 165D* Postcolonial Literature
(3) ENGL 170H* Introduction to Comedy
(3) ENGL 170I* Introduction to Tragedy
(3) ENGL/ETHN 180A* Forms of African-American Poetry
(3) ENGL/ETHN 180B+ Forms of African-American Fiction
(3) ENGL 180H+ American Identities
(3) ENGL 180J Jewish American Literature
(3) ENGL 180L* Chicano Literature
(3) ENGL 180M*+ Asian American Literature
(3) ENGL 180Z Topics in Multi-Ethnic Literatures
(3) ENGL 185B* 20th Century Fiction by Women
(3) ETHN/WOMS 118 Asian American Women
(3) ETHN 143 American Indians, Film, and Popular Culture
(3) ETHN 145* Native Voice, Memory, and Biography
(3) ETHN 150 Native American Oral Tradition and Storytelling
(3) ETHN 171 African Religions and Philosophies
(3) FREN 120 French Civilization
(3) GERM 140 Heroes, Dragons, and Quests
(3) GERM 141 German Mythology and Legend
(3) GERM 142 German Folk Literature, Legend, and Lore
(3) GERM 143 King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in Germany
(3) GERM 150 German Civilization: Beginning to 16th Century
(3) GERM 151 German Civilization: 17th Century to Present
(3) HIST 103 Mediterranean Europe: From the Renaissance to the European Union
(3) HIST 105* Great Ages and Issues in Modern European History
(3) HIST 106* Everyday Life and Society in Antiquity
(3) HIST 110 The Ancient Near East: A Cultural History
(3) HIST 111 Ancient Greece
(3) HIST 112 Ancient Rome
(3) HIST 113 Early Medieval Europe
(3) HIST 122A* History of Women in Western Civilization, Prehistory-Middle Ages
(3) HIST 122B* History of Women in Western Civilization, Renaissance-Present
(3) HIST/HRS 126 The History of Christianity to the Reformation
(3) HIST/HRS 127 The History of Christianity Since the Reformation
(3) HIST 129A Medieval Russia
(3) HIST 135A History of Mexico to 1910
(3) HIST 142 The History of Women in Africa
(3) HIST 143A Middle Eastern History to 1800
(3) HIST 146A Cultural History of Japan to 1800
(3) HIST 146C The History of Magna
(3) HIST /HRS 147 History of Buddhism
(3) HIST 148A China: Antiquity to 1600 A.D.
(3) HIST/HRS 168 *+ Images of America
(3) HIST/HRS 169 Hollywood and America
(3) HIST 170 History of Religion in the U.S.
(3) HRS 113 The Culture of Classical Greece
(3) HRS 114 The Culture of Classical Rome
(3) HRS 117 Paganism in the Roman World
(3) HRS 119 Classical Mythology
(3) HRS 120* Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture
(3) HRS 121 Introduction to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
(3) HRS 122 Introduction to the New Testament
(3) HRS 131 Medieval Culture
(3) HRS 132* Renaissance
(3) HRS 134 Baroque and the Enlightenment
(3) HRS 135 Romanticism and Revolution
(3) HRS 136 Birth of the Modern
(3) HRS 137 Global Crossings: Art and Culture 1945 to Present
(3) HRS 140* Exploring World Religions
(3) HRS 141 Introduction to Judaism
(3) HRS 142 Introduction to Christianity
(3) HRS 144 Introduction to Islam
(3) HRS 145 Introduction to Islamic Culture
(3) HRS 148 African Arts and Cultures
(3) HRS 151 World Mythology
(3) HRS 152 Great Mystics of the World
(3) HRS 154 Food, Farming, and the Sacred
(3) HRS 155 Spirit and Nature
(3) HRS 161+ Multicultural America
(3) HRS 162 American Space and Identity
(3) HRS 171 Introduction to the East Asian World
(3) HRS 172 Classical Culture of China
(3) HRS 173 Chinese Philosophy and Religion
(3) HRS 174 Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
(3) HRS 175 Zen Buddhism and Daoism
(3) HRS 178A Religions of India I: The Formative Period
(3) HRS 178B Religions of India II: Medieval and Modern
(3) HRS 179A The Hindu Year: Fall
(3) HRS 179B The Hindu Year: Spring
(3) HRS 183 World Religions and Cultures in Cinema
(3) HRS 188 Fantasy and Romance
(3) ITAL 130 Italian Civilization: The Dialogue Form
(3) KINS 118A+ Martial Arts: Karate
(3) KINS 118B+ Martial Arts: Tae Kwon Do
(3) KINS 118C+ Martial Arts: Tai Chi
(3) PHIL 102 Professional and Public Service Ethics
(3) PHIL 112* History of Ethics
(3) PHIL 115* Philosophy in Literature
(3) PHIL 117* Existentialism
(3) PHIL 122 Political Philosophy
(3) PHIL 131 Philosophy of Religion
(3) PHIL 145A* Chinese Philosophy
(3) PHIL 145B* Philosophies of India
(3) RUSS 120 Russian Civilization
(3) SOC 135 Sociology of Popular Culture
(3) SOC 160 Asian Societies
(3) SOC 162 Middle Eastern Societies and Cultures
(3) WOMS 121 Women of the Middle East
(3) WOMS 145 Feminism and the Spirit

Area D: The Individual and Society (12 units)
Minimum of three disciplines (e.g. ANTH, ECON, ETHN, FACS, GOVT, HIST, RPTA, etc.) must be taken in Area D.
The American Institutions graduation requirement may be satisfied in Area D with 3 units of US history courses and 3 units of US Constitution and CA government courses (see Graduation Requirements: American Institutions).

Lower Division:

(3) ANTH 2 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
(3) ANTH 3 Introduction to Archaeology
(3) CRJ 1 Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society
(3) DEAF 60 Introduction to Deaf Studies
(3) ECON 1A Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis
(3) ECON 1B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis
(3) ETHN 10 Africa: Myths and Realities
(3) ETHN 11+ Introduction to Ethnic Studies
(3) ETHN 11H Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Honors
(3) ETHN 14 Introduction to Asian American Studies
(3) ETHN 30+ Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies
(3) ETHN 53 Introduction to Native American Studies
(3) ETHN 70 Introduction to Pan African Studies
(3) FACS 50+ The Family and Social Issues
(3) GEOG 2 Cultural Geography
(3) GOVT 1 Essentials of Government
(3) GOVT 35 World Politics
(3) HIST 15H + Major Problems in U.S. History
(3) HIST 17A + U.S. History: 1607-1877
(3) HIST 17B+ U.S. History: 1877 to the Present
(3) NURS 10 Health Care: Issues and Delivery Systems
(3) PSYC 2 Introductory Psychology
(3) RPTA 33 Race, Class, Gender, and Leisure
(3) SOC 1 Principles of Sociology
(3) SOC 3 Social Problems
(3) SOC 10 Issues in Crime and Social Control
(3) WOMS 50 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality

Upper Division

(3) ANTH 101+ Cultural Diversity
(3) ANTH 102* The Nature of Culture
(3) ANTH 143 Culture and Society in Mexico
(3) ANTH 147 Peoples of Southeast Asia
(3) ANTH 149 Cultures of South Asia
(3) ANTH 183 Women Cross-Culturally
(3) ANTH 186*+ Culture and Poverty
(3) CHDV 145+ Controversial Issues in Childhood Development, Education, and Social Policy
(3) COMS 152 Freedom of Speech
(3) CRJ 111 Women and the Criminal Justice System
(3) CRJ 112 Gangs and Threat Groups In America
(3) CRJ 114 Sexual Offenses and Offenders
(3) CRJ 115 Violence and Terrorism
(3) CRJ 116 Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution
(3) CRJ 117+ American Criminal Justice and Minority Groups
(3) CRJ 118 Drug Abuse and Criminal Behavior
(3) ECON 181+ Economics of Racism
(3) EDUC 160*+ Urban Education
(3) ENGR 105 Sustainable Design and Construction
(3) ENVS 110 Contemporary Environmental Issues
(3) ENVS 112* International Environmental Problems
(3) ENVS/HIST 165 American Environmental History
(3) ETHN 100*+ Ethnic America
(3) ETHN 110 The Asian American Experience
(3) ETHN 112 Contemporary Asian American Issues
(3) ETHN 113 Asian American Communities
(3) ETHN 114 Asian Americans and Globalization
(3) ETHN 116 Asian American Politics and Public Policy
(3) ETHN 122 Sikh Americans and Globalization
(3) ETHN 130 Chicano/Mexican-American Experience
(3) ETHN 131+ La Raza Studies
(3) ETHN 136 U.S. Mexican Border Relations
(3) ETHN 137 Race and Ethnicity in Latin America and Caribbean
(3) ETHN 140 Native American Experience
(3) ETHN/GOVT 141+ Politics of the African Diaspora
(3) ETHN 142 Native American Tribal Governments
(3) ETHN 155 Genocide and Holocaust Studies
(3) ETHN 170 Pan African Studies
(3) GEOG 145 Population Geography
(3) GEOL 140 Population Geography
(3) GERO 100 Aging Issues in Contemporary America
(3) GOVT 113 American Political Thought
(3) GOVT/JOUR 134 War, Peace, and Mass Media
(3) GOVT 142 Government and Politics in Africa
(3) GOVT 143 Causes of War, Causes of Peace
(3) GOVT 144 Government and Politics in Europe
(3) GOVT 147 Latin American Government and Politics
(3) GOVT 148 Government and Politics of the Middle East
(3) GOVT 150 American Governments
(3) GOVT 163 + Introduction to Black Politics in U.S.
(3) GOVT 165 *+ Politics of the Underrepresented
(3) GOVT 169A Science, Technology, and Politics
(3) GOVT 180 California State and Local Government
(3) HIST 119 Europe Since 1945
(3) HIST 130 The Fall of Communism
(3) HIST 135B Revolutionary and Modern Mexico
(3) HIST 138A * Modern and Contemporary Latin America
(3) HIST 138B * Modern and Contemporary Latin America
(3) HIST 141 History of Africa Since 1800
(3) HIST 143B The Modern Middle East
(3) HIST 146B Modern Japan: 1800 to the Present
(3) HIST 148B China, 1600 to Present
(3) HIST 157 History of International Relations in the 20th Century
(3) HIST 159 History of U.S. Foreign Relations
(3) HIST 161 The American Vision
(3) HIST 162 Social History of the U.S.
(3) HIST 163 The City in U.S. History
(3) HIST 167 History of American Women
(3) HIST 177 + The African-American Experience 1603 to the Present
(3) HIST 173 + The History of the Civil Rights Movement: 1865-Present
(3) HIST 175 Sex, Population, and Birth Control in America
(3) HIST 182 American West
(3) HLSC 114 Human Ecology and Health
(3) HRS 185 Women in Film and American Culture
(3) JOUR 172 Women in the Mass Media
(3) LBRS 100/SOC 176 * Labor and the American Social Structure
(3) MGMT 117* Business Ethics and Society
(3) NURS 167 Women’s Health
(3) PHIL 101* Ethics and Social Issues
(3) PHIL 103 Business and Computer Ethics
(3) PHIL 104 Bioethics
(3) PHIL 105 Science and Human Values
(3) SOC 106 Births, Deaths, and Borders
(3) SOC 118+ Chicano Community
(3) SOC 120+ Ethnic and Race Relations
(3) SOC 139 Animals in Society
(3) SOC 155 Criminology
(3) SOC 156 Delinquency
(3) SOC 163 Conflict, Oil, and Development in the Middle East
(3) SOC 164 Sociology of Globalization
(3) SWRK 102+ Crosscultural Theory and Practice: Issues of Race, Gender, and Class
(3) SWRK 126* Theories of Criminal Behavior
(3) SWRK 134 Crimes Without Victims
(3) SWRK 136 Poverty and Homelessness in America
(3) SWRK 150 Welfare in America
(3) SWRK 151 Health Services and Systems
(3) SWRK 191* Exploring Veteran Studies: An Ethnographic Approach
(3) WOMS 110 Introduction to the Women’s Movement in Contemporary Society
(3) WOMS 115 Introduction to Women Studies
(3) WOMS 136*+ Gender, Race, and Class
(3) WOMS 137+ Women of Color
(3) WOMS 138* Women and Work
(3) WOMS 139 Violence Against Women

Area E: Understanding Personal Development (3 units)
Only a single one-unit KINS activity course may be applied to this area. A one-unit KINS course cannot be combined with a two-unit DNCE course to meet this requirement. KINS 99 may be taken concurrently with any 1 unit KINS activity course for a total of 3 units of area E GE credit.

Lower Division

(3) ALS 21 First Year Seminar
(3) ANTH 21 First Year Seminar
(3) EDUC 21 First Year Seminar
(3) CHDV 30 Human Development
(3) CHDV 35 Child and Adolescent Development
(3) COMS 21 First Year Seminar
(3) CRJ 21 First Year Seminar
(3) CSC 21 First Year Seminar
(3) ENGL 21 First Year Seminar
(3) ENVS 21 First Year Seminar
(3) ETHN 21 First Year Seminar
(3) FACS 10 Nutrition and Wellness
(3) FACS 52 The Child in the Family
(3) FORL 21 First Year Seminar
(3) GERO 21 First Year Seminar
(3) GNST 21 First Year Seminar
(3) HIST 21 First Year Seminar
(3) HLSC 50 Healthy Lifestyles
(3) HONR 1 First Year Seminar: Education, Self-Examination, and Living
(3) HRS 21 First Year Seminar
(3) ID 21 First Year Seminar
(3) KINS 21 First Year Seminar
(2) KINS 99 Exercise for Healthy Living
(3) MGMT 21 First Year Seminar
(3) MUSC 21 First Year Seminar
(3) NSM 21 First Year Seminar
(3) PHIL 21 First Year Seminar
(3) RPTA 21 First Year Seminar
(3) RPTA 32 Leadership and Group Development
(3) RPTA 34 The Outdoor Recreation Experience
(3) SPHP 21 First Year Seminar

Upper Division

(3) COMS 114 Communication and American Culture
(3) EDUC 165*+ Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education
(3) ETHN 115 Biracial and Multiracial Identity in the U.S.
(3) ETHN 132 La Mujer Chicana
(3) ETHN 133+ Cross-Cultural Aging In America
(3) FACS 140* Family Resource Management
(3) FACS 141 Family Finance
(3) FACS 150*+ Family Stress and Coping: Multicultural Focus
(3) HIST 166 Popular Culture
(3) HLSC 124 Consumer Health Education
(3) HLSC 130 Alcohol and Other Drugs
(3) HLSC 134 Understanding Human Sexuality
(3) NURS 120Nursing Applications of Research and Critical Analysis
(3) NURS 160 Human Sexuality
(3) PHIL 100 Ethics and Personal Values
(3) PSYC 134 Psychology of Human Sexuality
(3) PSYC 135 Psychology of Multicultural Groups
(3) PSYC 137 Stress Management
(3) PSYC 151 Psychological Aspects of Death and Dying
(3) RPTA 100 Recreation and Leisure Lifestyle Development
(3) RPTA 122* Perspectives on Leisure
(3) SOC 126 Sociology of Gender
(3) SOC 127 Men, Masculinity, and Society
(3) SOC 158 Sociology of Deviance
(3) SOC 168* Self and Society
(3) WOMS 120 Mother, Woman, Person

Additional Graduation Requirements

The 48-unit General Education requirement does not include the following two graduation requirements:

• Second semester composition (English 20, English 20M or an approved equivalent).

• Foreign language graduation requirement may be met by successfully completing appropriate coursework or passing proficiency exams. With a grade of “C-“ or better, the following second semester or equivalent college-level language courses may satisfy both GE Area C2 units and the Foreign Language Requirement: CHIN 1B; FREN 1B; FREN 2A; GERM 1B; ITAL 1B; JAPN 1B; PUNJ 1B; RUSS 1B; SPAN 1B.

American Institutions

This requirement may be fulfilled by completing one Government and one US History course from the following list. The courses below also satisfy Area D units. In addition, students have the option of taking challenges in US History, US Constitution and California State and Local Government.  For details on challenges exam, see http://www.csus.edu/ccr/Challenge%20Exams/.

US History

(3) HIST 15H + Major Problems in U.S. History
(3) HIST 17A + U.S. History: 1607-1877
(3) HIST 17B+ U.S. History: 1877 to the Present
(3) HIST 159 History of U.S. Foreign Relations
(3) HIST 161 The American Vision
(3) HIST 162 Social History of the U.S.
(3) HIST 167 History of American Women
(3) HIST 177 + The African-American Experience 1603 to the Present
(3) HIST 182 American West

US Constitution and CA Government

(3) GOVT 1 Essentials of Government
(3) GOVT 113 American Political Thought
(3) GOVT 150 American Governments

CA Government (California State and Local Government does not meet the U.S. Constitution requirement included in other government courses listed above but may be used by students who have taken a U.S. Constitution course outside of California. It fulfills the state and local government requirement only).

(3) GOVT 180 California State and Local Government

Race & Ethnicity in American Society (3-unit Supervenient Requirement)

These courses also meet specific GE requirements in Areas C-E. Those courses are noted with an "+" in the list of approved GE courses. One of these courses is required for students with catalog rights beginning Fall 1990 or later. The course may also be applied to the Area requirements.

Lower Division

(3) ETHN 11 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
(3) ETHN 30 Intro to Chicano/Latino Studies
(3) FACS 50 The Family and Social Issues
(3) HIST 15H Major Problems in U.S. History
(3) HIST 17A U.S. History: 1607 to 1877
(3) HIST 17B U.S. History: 1877 to Present

Upper Division

(3) ANTH 101 Cultural Diversity
(3) ANTH 186* Culture and Poverty
(3) CHDV 145 Controversial Issues in Childhood Development, Education, and Social Policy
(3) CRJ 117 American Criminal Justice and Minority Groups
(3) DNCE 131 Dance Cultures of America
(3) DNCE 132 African Caribbean Dance
(3) ECON 181 Economics of Racism
(3) EDUC 121* Multicultural Children's Literature
(3) EDUC 160* Urban Education
(3) EDUC 165* Sex-role Stereotyping in American Education
(3) ENGL/ENTH 180B+ Forms of African-American Fiction
(3) ENGL 180H American Identities
(3) ENGL 180M* Asian American Literature
(3) ETHN 100* Ethnic America
(3) ETHN 131 La Raza Studies
(3) ETHN 133 Cross-cultural Aging in America
(3) ETHN/GOVT 141 Politics of the African Diaspora
(3) FACS 150* Family Stress and Coping: Multicultural Focus
(3) GOVT 163 Introduction to Black Politics in the U.S.
(3) GOVT 165* Politics of the Underrepresented
(3) HIST/HRS 168* Images of America
(3) HIST 173 The History of the Civil Rights Movement: 1865-Present
(3) HIST 177 African-American Experience, 1603 to Present
(3) HRS 161 Multicultural America
(3) KINS 118A Martial Arts: Karate
(3) KINS 118B Martial Arts: Tae Kwon Do
(3) KINS 118C Martial Arts: Tai Chi
(3) SOC 118 Chicano Community
(3) SOC 120 Ethnic and Race Relations
(3) SWRK 102 Cross-cultural Theory & Practices: Issues of Race, Gender, and Class
(3) THEA 115A Multicultural Puppetry
(3) THEA/WOMS 144 Women and Theatre: Staging Diversity
(3) THEA 174 Multicultural Perspectives in American Theatre
(3) THEA 175 Multicultural Perspectives in American Film
(3) WOMS 136* Gender, Race, and Class
(3) WOMS 137 Women of Color 

Writing Intensive (3-unit Supervenient Requirement)

One Writing Intensive course, i.e., a course with comprehensive writing assignments (minimum 5,000 words) is required. This requirement may be met either with a GE course designated with an asterisk "*" or, in certain majors, with a course required for the major. (Writing Intensive courses taken to meet major requirements do not apply to the nine-unit upper division requirement in GE.) Prerequisite: Completion of GE Areas A2, A3, second semester composition (English 20), junior standing, and English 109M/W. Students who take the WPJ instead of initially taking English 109M/W must score 70, 71, or 80. Students with a lower WPJ score will have to complete other prerequisites determined by their score. Successful completion of the writing intensive course certifies the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR).

(3) ANTH 102 The Nature of Culture
(3) ANTH/HRS 170 The Religious Landscape of the Sacramento Valley
(3) ANTH 186+ Culture and Poverty
(3) ART 111 Latin American and Latino Art History
(3) ASIA/HIST 140 Modern East Asian Cinema
(3) ASTR 131 The Solar System and Space Exploration
(3) ASTR 132 Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology
(3) CHDV 143 Mind and Brain in Developmental Context
(3) COMS 100B^ Critical Analysis of Messages
(3) CRJ 190^ Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
(3) EDUC 121+ Multicultural Children's Literature
(3) EDUC 160+ Urban Education
(3) EDUC 165+ Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education
(3) ENGL 120C^ Topics in Composition
(3) ENGL 120P^ Professional Writing
(3) ENGL 120R^ Topics in Rhetoric
(3) ENGL 130M Art of Autobiography
(3) ENGL 140M Modern British Drama, 1889 to Present
(3) ENGL 141A The Essential Shakespeare
(3) ENGL 150B^ American Romanticism
(3) ENGL 165D Postcolonial Literature
(3) ENGL 170H Introduction to Comedy
(3) ENGL 170I Introduction to Tragedy
(3) ENGL/ETHN 180A Forms of African-American Poetry
(3) ENGL/ETHN 180B+ Forms of African-American Fiction
(3) ENGL 180L Chicano Literature
(3) ENGL 180M+ Asian American Literature
(3) ENGL 185B 20th Century Fiction by Women
(3) ENVS 112 International Environmental Problems
(3) ETHN 100+ Ethnic America
(3) ETHN 145 Native Voice, Memory, and Biography
(3) FACS 112 Current Topics in Nutritional Sciences
(3) FACS 140 Family Resource Management
(3) FACS 150+ Family Stress and Coping: Multicultural Focus
(3) GEOG 190^ Senior Research Seminar in Geography
(3) GOVT 165 + Politics of the Underrepresented
(3) HIST 105 Great Ages and Issues in Modern European History
(3) HIST 106 Everyday Life and Society in Antiquity
(3) HIST 122A History of Women in Western Civilization, Prehistory-Middle Ages
(3) HIST 122B History of Women in Western Civilization, Renaissance-Present
(3) HIST 138A Modern and Contemporary Latin America
(3) HIST 138B Modern and Contemporary Latin America
(3) HIST/HRS 168 + Images of America
(3) HRS 120 Reason and Revelation: The Origins of Western Culture
(3) HRS 132 Renaissance
(3) HRS 140 Exploring World Religions
(3) JOUR 135^ Public Affairs Reporting
(3) KINS 133^ Integration of Concepts
(3) LBRS 100/SOC 176 Labor and the American Social Structure
(3) MGMT 117 Business Ethics and Society
(3) MUSC 127 The American Musical Theatre
(3) MUSC 129 American Society and Its Music
(3) NURS 120 Nursing Applications of Research and Critical Analysis
(3) NURS 179 Professional Communication and Reasoning Development (for Nursing Majors only)
(3) PHIL 101 Ethics and Social Issues
(3) PHIL 105 Science and Human Values
(3) PHIL 112 History of Ethics
(3) PHIL 115 Philosophy in Literature
(3) PHIL 117 Existentialism
(3) PHIL 145A Chinese Philosophy
(3) PHIL 145B Philosophies of India
(3) RPTA 122 Perspectives on Leisure
(3) SOC 168 Self and Society
(3) SWRK 126 Theories of Criminal Behavior
(3) SWRK 191 Exploring Veteran Studies: An Ethnographic Approach
(3) THEA 170 African American Theatre and Culture
(3) WOMS 136+ Gender, Race, and Class
(3) WOMS 138 Women and Work

Note: Courses designated by the symbol (^) have prerequisites that make them appropriate Writing Intensive classes for majors only. They do not fulfill any GE Area requirements.

General Education Policies

• All upper division GE courses require at least second semester sophomore standing (45 units) and completion of all GE Area A courses as prerequisites.
• At least 9 units must be chosen from upper division GE courses (100-199) and at least 9 units must be taken in residence at Sacramento State (these units may overlap).
• Each course taken to satisfy the Area A Basic Subjects and Area B4 Quantitative Reasoning must be completed with a grade of “C-” or higher.
• A 2.0 cumulative GPA is required in General Education.

Overlap Between General Education and Majors/Minors (Fall 1992 - Spring 2013)

General Education requirements include five areas (A-E) in which you must take courses (area requirements), a nine-unit upper division requirement, a Race and Ethnicity requirement, and a Writing Intensive requirement. The overlap possibilities among these four aspects of General Education are outlined below. Students needing help applying these overlap policies are encouraged to see an advisor in the Academic Advising Center, Lassen Hall 1012.
1. A maximum of nine units of coursework from your major department may also be applied to the General Education requirements.
2. The Race and Ethnicity requirement can be met with an upper or lower division course from a student’s major or major department. Example: A Social Work major can use SWRK 102 to meet the Race and Ethnicity requirement.
3. The Writing Intensive requirement can be met with a course from the major or major department in specified majors, but not in all majors.
4. There is no restriction on the overlap of courses between GE and minor requirements*
Note: For Business Administration majors, substitute “College of Business” for “major department.” For Social Science majors, substitute “History” for “major department.”

Overlap Between General Education and Majors/Minors (Fall 2013 and Later)

General Education requirements include five areas (A-E) in which you must take courses (area requirements), a nine-unit upper division requirement, a Race and Ethnicity requirement, and a Writing Intensive requirement. The overlap possibilities among these four aspects of General Education are outlined below. Students needing help applying these overlap policies are encouraged to see an advisor in the Academic Advising Center, Lassen Hall 1012.
1. There is no university restriction on the overlap of courses between GE and coursework approved for GE from your major department.
2. The Race and Ethnicity requirement can be met with an upper or lower division course from a student’s major or major department. Example: A Social Work major can use SWRK 102 to meet the Race and Ethnicity requirement.
3. The Writing Intensive requirement can be met with a course from the major or major department in specified majors, but not in all majors.
4. There is no restriction on the overlap of courses between GE and minor requirements

Transfer Students

Transfer students who have completed lower division General Education requirements at a California Community College, including those certified under the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Core Curriculum (IGETC), are required to complete 9 units of upper division GE at Sacramento State, meet the foreign language proficiency graduation requirement, meet the state “code” requirements in U.S. History, American and California Government, and the writing intensive requirement. These 9 units may or may not include the writing intensive requirement, depending on the policy of the student’s major department. Students who have not completed an approved course for the "Race and Ethnicity in American Society" category at a community college must take a course in this category at Sacramento State. In addition, all transfer students, except those fully certified as having completed the IGETC core curriculum, must complete the required second semester writing course or an approved course at a community college.

For more information about IGETC requirements, contact your community college counselor.

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