English

College of Arts and Letters

Program Description

The English department of California State University, Sacramento, is a community of teachers, scholars, writers, and support staff whose primary mission is to promote learning in composition, creative writing, English education, linguistics, literature, and the teaching of English as a second language. The department seeks to help students acquire knowledge, develop skills, and realize their own intellectual and creative goals.

At the undergraduate and graduate levels, the English Department presents a broad and balanced curriculum designed to develop the reading and writing skills, the interpretative abilities, and the cultural awareness of its students by maintaining and enhancing a tradition of strong teaching, solid scholarship, and vigorous support of creative literary activity.

Concentrations

  • MA: Literature / Creative Writing / Composition / Teaching English as a Second or Other Language (TESOL)

Special Features

  • A Course Description Booklet giving detailed descriptions of courses to be offered in the next semester, together with statements of requirements for the major and minor and for the graduate program, will be available on the English Department Web site a month or so before registration materials are issued. All students are assigned an English faculty advisor; students are encouraged to consult with them in planning schedules. English majors and minors are urged to examine their career goals early in their program and to discuss their plans with English Department faculty advisors.
  • Qualified upper division and graduate students may apply for paid assistantships or associateships in the English Department. Student Assistants and Graduate Assistants usually work from 10 to 20 hours per week at such tasks as tutoring and clerical assistance. Teaching Associates normally teach one section of composition each semester for up to three semesters. Information is available on the English Department website.
  • Internships are available for academic credit and career training governmental agencies, businesses, community colleges, and other institutions and organizations.
  • Students interested in the various aspects of publication are encouraged to become involved in the student-produced Calaveras Station Literary Journal, a professional-quality journal of student work published annually. Submissions, solicited in fall semester, are open to all Sacramento State students.

Career Possibilities

Advertising Person · Arts Program Administrator · Business Administrator · Civil Servant · Columnist/Journalist · Contract Specialist · Creative Writer · Drama/Film Critic · Editor/Evaluator · Educator · Film/TV Scriptwriter · Information Specialist · Interpreter · Lawyer · Legislative Assistant · Methods Analyst · Program Developer · Public Relations Person · Researcher · Technical Writer · Writing Consultant

Contact Information

David Toise, Department Chair
Aaron Eichenberger, Administrative Support Coordinator
Calaveras Hall 103
(916) 278-6586
www.csus.edu/engl

Faculty

BUCHANAN, BRADLEY W.

CLARK, JOHN T.

CLARK-OATES, ANGELA

COPE, JONAS

CORDOVA, TERESA A.

DELEHANT, CAROLYN A.

DUROSKO, SUSAN

FANETTI, SUSAN

FRAGA, CATHERINE N.

GIEGER, JASON C.

HAYES, HOGAN

HEATHER, JULIAN

HECKATHORN, AMY C.

KOMIYAMA, REIKO

LEE, HELLEN

MACKLIN, TIALITHA

MARTINEZ, ROSA

McKINNEY, JOSHUA B.

MICHAELS, ANN

MITCHELL, REBECCA

MORALES, SYLVIA

NEUFFER, LORI

OVERBY, BLAIR

PAGE, MONICA C.

RICE, DOUGLAS F.

SCHARF, ANITA V.

SEO, MI-SUK

STAGNARO, MEL J.

STANLEY, ROBERT D.

SWEET, NANCY F.

TOISE, DAVID W.

YEN, JULIE W.

ZARINS, KIM

 

Undergraduate Programs

English majors must achieve a grade of "C-" or better in all courses included in the major, unless otherwise specified.

With the noted exception of ENGL 5, English courses may NOT be challenged.

BA in English

Units required for Major: 45, 27-30 of which must be upper division
Minimum total units required for the BA: 120

Required Lower Division Courses (9 Units)
Select three of the following: 19
Introduction to British Literature I
Introduction to British Literature II
Introduction to American Literature I
Introduction to American Literature II
Introduction to World Literatures in English
Required Upper Division Courses (6 Units)
ENGL 120AAdvanced Composition3
ENGL 198TSenior Seminar In English 23
Additional Requirements
Historical Breadth requirement
Select one of the following: 3
Introduction to British Literature I
Introduction to American Literature I
History of the English Language
Medieval Literature
The English Renaissance
Restoration Comedy
The Golden Age Of Satire
Birth of the British Novel
Renaissance Drama
The Essential Shakespeare
Shakespop: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Chaucer - Canterbury Tales
Shakespeare - Early Plays, 1592-1600
Shakespeare - Later Plays, 1600-1612
John Milton
Early American Literature
Electives (30 Units)
Select 30 units including the Historical Breadth 430
Total Units45
1

Students must take at least one British Literature survey (ENGL 40A, ENGL 40B), and at least one American Literature survey (ENGL 50A, ENGL 50B). We recommend that lower division requirements be completed no later than the first semester in which the student begins taking required upper division courses.

2

Students are required to complete a course in their senior year, selecting from courses specially designated as Senior Seminars. The seminar has a reduced class size and requires a term paper, student presentations and submission of the student's work.

3

Students must take one of the classes listed to satisfy this requirement (unless they have already taken ENGL 40A or ENGL 50A as one of the required Lower Division courses)

4

A minimum of 27 additional units must be taken, of which at least 18 units must be upper division.

Students who have satisfied the historical breadth requirement by taking ENGL 40A or ENGL 50A as one of their three required lower division courses will take 30 units of electives, of which at least 21 must be upper division.

Notes:

  • Students must complete 18 units of English, of which at least 15 must be in upper division (100-level) courses, in residence at California State University, Sacramento.
  • The following courses may not be included toward the major:
    ENGL 1Basic Writing Skills3
    ENGL 3Introduction to Academic Discourse4
    ENGL 3MIntroduction to Academic Discourse for Multilingual Students4
    ENGL 5Accelerated Academic Literacies3
    ENGL 1CCritical Thinking and Writing3
    ENGL 1XComposition Tutorial1
    ENGL 5MAccelerated Academic Literacies - Multilingual3
    ENGL 10Academic Literacies I3
    ENGL 10MAcademic Literacies I - Multilingual3
    ENGL 11Academic Literacies II3
    ENGL 11MAcademic Literacies II-Multilingual3
    ENGL 20College Composition II3
    ENGL 20MCollege Composition II for Multilingual Students3
    ENGL 60Reading for Speed and Efficiency2
    ENGL 60MReading for Speed and Efficiency for Multilingual Students2
    ENGL 85Grammar for Multilingual Writers2
    ENGL 86College Language Skills for Multilingual Students4
    ENGL 87Basic Writing Skills for Multilingual Students3
    ENGL 109MWriting for GWAR Placement-Multilingual3
    ENGL 109WWriting for GWAR Placement3
    ENGL 109XWriting-Intensive Workshop1
  • Up to 6 units of ENGL 199 may be included in the 27 upper division units. Three units in an upper division literature class from another major may also be included.
  • English majors must achieve a grade of "C-" or better in all courses included in the major, unless otherwise specified.
  • With the noted exception of ENGL 5, English courses may NOT be challenged.
  • English majors must fulfill the GE Writing Intensive "supervenient requirement" with courses in the major, only.

Minor - English

Units required for Minor: 21, all to be taken in English. At least 12 units must be in upper division (100-level) courses. The following may not be counted toward the minor:

ENGL 1Basic Writing Skills3
ENGL 5Accelerated Academic Literacies3
ENGL 1CCritical Thinking and Writing3
ENGL 5MAccelerated Academic Literacies - Multilingual3
ENGL 20College Composition II3
ENGL 109MWriting for GWAR Placement-Multilingual3
ENGL 109WWriting for GWAR Placement3

Grades of "C-" or better are required in all courses in the minor. Nine of the units for the minor, including at least 6 upper division units, must be taken in residence at Sacramento State. Specific requirements:

Required Courses (21 Units)
ENGL 40AIntroduction to British Literature I3
ENGL 50AIntroduction to American Literature I3
ENGL 145BShakespeare - Early Plays, 1592-16003
or ENGL 145C Shakespeare - Later Plays, 1600-1612
Select 12 additional units English electives (minimum 9 units upper divison English)12
Total Units21

Minor - Creative Writing

Units required for Minor: 18 (6 required; 12 elective), all of which must be taken in English through the Creative Writing Program. At least nine units must be in upper division (130-level) courses. The following may not be counted toward the minor:

ENGL 1Basic Writing Skills3
ENGL 5Accelerated Academic Literacies3
ENGL 1CCritical Thinking and Writing3
ENGL 5MAccelerated Academic Literacies - Multilingual3
ENGL 20College Composition II3
ENGL 109MWriting for GWAR Placement-Multilingual3
ENGL 109WWriting for GWAR Placement3
ENGL 120AAdvanced Composition3

Grades of "C-" or better are required in all courses in the minor. Nine of the units for the minor, including at least 6 upper division units, must be taken in residence at Sacramento State. Specific requirements:

Required Courses (18 Units)
ENGL 30AIntroduction to Creative Writing3
ENGL 30BIntroduction to Writing Fiction3
or ENGL 30C Introduction to Poetry Writing
Select 12 additional units of Creative Writing courses (minimum of 9 must be upper division) 12
Total Units18

Minor - Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL)

Units required for minor: 18. Six courses are required and must be taken at Sacramento State.

ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
ENGL 110QEnglish Grammar for ESL Teachers3
ENGL 125EAcademic Reading and Writing for Second Language Students3
ENGL 125FTeaching Oral Skills3
Elective course to be chosen from the English 110 series3
Total Units18

Note: Courses being applied to other degree programs (e.g., to Spanish majors) cannot also be applied to the TESOL Minor. See the TESOL Coordinator for prior approval of substitute courses.

Students choosing to major in English may NOT minor in TESOL.

Single Subject Matter Program (Pre-Credential Preparation)

Units required: 48, 30 units of which must be upper division.

The English Single Subject Matter Program is a version of the major designed for students planning to teach English at the secondary school level.

Both new and continuing students in this major must establish a file with the English Education Advisor and to see the advisor at least once per semester to keep their file current.

Required Courses (48 Units)
COMS 104Persuasive Public Speaking3
ENGL 40BIntroduction to British Literature II3
ENGL 50AIntroduction to American Literature I3
ENGL 50BIntroduction to American Literature II3
ENGL 65Introduction to World Literatures in English3
ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
Select one of the following:3
Traditional Grammar and Standard Usage
English Grammar for ESL Teachers
Structure Of English
ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
ENGL 120AAdvanced Composition3
ENGL 125BWriting and the Young Writer3
ENGL 145BShakespeare - Early Plays, 1592-16003
or ENGL 145C Shakespeare - Later Plays, 1600-1612
ENGL 198TSenior Seminar In English3
ENGL 125ALiterature and Film for Adolescents3
Select 9 units of English electives9
Total Units48

Notes:

  • Students declared in the English (Pre-Credential) major must make an advising appointment with the English Education Coordinator as soon as possible. 
  • Students must achieve a grade of "B-" or better in the following courses:
    ENGL 16Structure Of English3
    or ENGL 110J Traditional Grammar and Standard Usage
    or ENGL 110Q English Grammar for ESL Teachers
    ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
    ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
    ENGL 125ALiterature and Film for Adolescents3
    ENGL 125BWriting and the Young Writer3
  • Students must achieve a grade of "C" or better in all other courses for the program.
  • Students must fulfill the GE Writing Intensive "supervenient requirement" with courses in the major, only.   The Writing Intensive course will count as 3 units of the 9 units of English electives listed above.

Certificate - Teaching Composition

Units required for the certificate: 181
Candidates must have an overall GPA of 3.0 in courses submitted for the certificate.

1

Employment as a Teaching Associate in the English Department at Sacramento State may be substituted for ENGL 410E, reducing total number of coursework units to 15.

Certificate - Information on Eligibility

Applicants for the Certificate Program in Teaching Composition must have completed all requirements for eligibility for any English graduate program.

Required Courses (12 Units)
ENGL 195AWriting Center Theory and Practice: Internships3
or ENGL 410A Writing Center Theory and Practice: Internships
ENGL 220ATeaching College Composition3
ENGL 220CTopics in Composition Studies3
Select one of the following:3
Internship in Teaching Writing
Teaching Associateship in English at Sacramento State
Electives (6 Units)
Select two of the following:6
Traditional Grammar and Standard Usage
English Grammar for ESL Teachers
ENGL 120 series exclusive of ENGL 120A
Writing and the Young Writer
Academic Reading and Writing for Second Language Students
Reading/Vocabulary Acquisition
ESL Writing/Composition
Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL
ENGL 220 series in addition to ENGL 220A and ENGL 220C
Theoretical Issues in Adult Literacies
Internship-ESL Teaching
Internship in Teaching Adult Reading
Total Units18

Certificate - Advanced Study in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

This TESOL certificate program has two options:

  • Option A: This option is intended for undergraduates who want preparation for teaching ESL students (in the U.S. or abroad).
  • Option B: This option is intended primarily for graduate (see English graduate page) students who want to pursue an MA in English or another field, but also want to be prepared to teach ESL writing at the college level.

Courses must be completed with grades of "B" or better; ENGL 110A and ENGL 110P must be completed before any ENGL 215 course; and ENGL 110Q must be completed before attempting ENGL 215C.

Information on Eligibility for options A and B

Students must either be in a degree program at Sacramento State or must apply for graduate admission to the University. Once admitted to Sacramento State, prospective TESOL Certificate students must apply to the TESOL Coordinator for admission to the program.

Undergraduates must be within 45 units of completing a bachelor's degree (in any field) with a 3.0 overall GPA.

Graduate students must have a completed bachelor's degree (in any field) with a 3.0 overall GPA.

All applicants must complete the University's Writing Placement for Juniors (WPJ) requirement.

International students must have a TOEFL score of 600 or higher (or a score of 250 or higher on the computerized TOEFL) and a score of 5 on the Test of Written English.

Option A: TESOL Certificate Program: Undergraduate

This option is intended for undergraduates who want preparation for teaching ESL students (in the U.S. or abroad).

Required Courses (9 Units)
ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
ENGL 110QEnglish Grammar for ESL Teachers3
Pedagogy Electives (6 Units)
Select two of the following:6
Technology in Second Language Teaching
Academic Reading and Writing for Second Language Students
Teaching Oral Skills
Total Units15

Option B: Certificate - TESOL

This option is intended primarily for graduate students who want to pursue an MA in English or another field, but also want to be prepared to teach ESL writing at the college level.

Required Courses (15 Units)
ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
ENGL 110QEnglish Grammar for ESL Teachers3
ENGL 215BESL Writing/Composition3
ENGL 410BInternship-ESL Teaching3
Elective (3 Units)
Select one of the following:3
Curriculum and Assessment Design for Language Classrooms
Technology in Second Language Teaching
Reading/Vocabulary Acquisition
Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL
Teaching College Composition
Topics in Composition Studies
Total Units18

Notes:The Certificate in TESOL is not a teaching credential. It is recognized abroad as advanced training in language teaching. In conjunction with a BA or MA degree or a state teaching credential, it may also be helpful in obtaining employment as an ESL teacher in the United States.

Graduate Programs

Description - Masters of Art Degree

The English Department offers an M.A. with three distinct concentrations:

  • Composition,
  • Creative writing,
  • and Literature

In general, the M.A. degree in each of its concentrations seeks to enhance students' skills in: critical reading; analysis of language, ideas, and the formal attributes of texts; creative engagement with the writing traditions of its three disciplinary fields; and independent research.

The three concentrations of the English M.A. offer preparation for students who aspire: to teach writing or literary study in high-school or community-college settings; to teach English to adult learners and to students abroad; to pursue career opportunities in fields such as journalism, publishing, law, technical and creative writing, advertising, arts administration, or civil service; or to pursue study at the doctoral level.

Because many graduate students work during the day, most graduate courses are scheduled for late afternoon and evening hours.

Note: In addition, the Department offers a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). A full description appears below.

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in English requires:

For: All Applicants to the Composition Concentration, Creative Writing Concentration, and Literature Concentration
  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 units of all university level coursework or a 3.0 GPA in courses in the English major on the transcript from the degree granting institution;
  • a minimum of 27 units of upper division courses in English;
  • (for foreign students from non-English speaking countries) a TOEFL score of 600 or higher (or a score of 250 or higher on the Computerized TOEFL) and a score of 5 on the Test of Written English; and
For: Applicants to the Literature Concentration and Creative Writing Concentration Only

In addition to the general requirements above, students applying to the concentration in creative writing must have completed undergraduate coursework that includes at least five courses in literature of at least three units each. Of these five literature courses:

  • At least one course must primarily address British literature and at least one course must primarily address American literature;
  • At least three of these five literature courses must be upper division.

Application Materials Required by the English Department for All Applicants

In addition to the materials that must be sent directly to the Office of Graduate Studies as outlined in "Application Materials Required by the University" (below), students must also send to the English M.A. Graduate Coordinator in the English Department additional material by the application deadline.

Before submitting the materials, please check with the English Department website (http//www.csus.edu/engl/) for updates and specific deadlines.

Please have the following material delivered to the English Department directly and addressed to the English M.A. Coordinator:

  • Personal statement of no more than 300-500 words. The personal statement should discuss the applicant's interest in the program concentration (literature, composition, or creative writing) that he or she has chosen and the experiences (academic and non-academic) that have shaped this interest and prepared the applicant for graduate work in this field.
  • Three confidentially submitted recommendation forms (found on the department website) for all students (both California State University, Sacramento and other institutions). Students graduating from universities other than California State University, Sacramento, must also provide formal letters from their three recommenders in addition to the completed recommendation forms.
  • Writing sample for Creative Writing applicants only (for prose or fiction, the writing sample should be no more than 15 pages; for poetry, the writing sample should consist of approximately 5 or 6 poems).
  • Students graduating from any institution other than California State University, Sacramento, must send directly to the English Department an official copy of all transcripts from each institution of higher education that they have attended.
  • Students who have attended California State University, Sacramento, must send directly to the English Department official transcripts from institutions of higher education they have attended other than California State University, Sacramento.
  • A completed copy of the Department of English Supplemental Application found on the English Department website.

The Graduate Coordinator will screen all applicants according to these requirements and a ranking system devised by the department. Applicants who have deficiencies in these admission requirements which can be removed by specified additional preparation will be ranked accordingly but may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response from the Graduate Coordinator to the student's admission application.

Note: Please see the section below, Teaching English to speakers of Other Languages (TESOL Concentration), for special requirements for admission to the TESOL M.A. program.

Application Materials Required by the University

In addition to any materials sent directly to the department, all prospective graduate students including California State University, Sacramento, graduates, must file the following with the Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission;
  • two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than California State University, Sacramento; and
  • TOEFL scores, if applicable.

Note: For materials that must be sent directly to the English Graduate Program Coordinator in the English Department, see "Application Materials Required by the English Department" as listed above.

Applicants are accepted as long as room for new students exists or until the deadline passes. Applicants should file as early as possible.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://csus.edu/gradstudies/.

Advancement to Candidacy for Students in the English M.A. Program (All Concentrations)

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy, indicating a proposed program of graduate study. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units of English 200-level courses in the Master's Degree program with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies. The student fills out the form after planning a degree program in consultation with an English faculty advisor. The completed form is then returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

MA in General English 

Units required for MA: 30, at least 18 of which must be taken in ENGL 200-level courses (ENGL 299, any ENGL 410 course and ENGL 500 do not count as part of this 18-unit requirement); up to 6 units of ENGL 299 may apply only as elective units. Minimum required GPA: 3.0

Note: No units with a grade lower than "C" may apply towards the degree.

Specific Requirements for:

  • Literature Concentration,
  • Creative Writing Concentration, and
  • Composition Concentration

All students follow the requirements of one of the Concentrations as described below:

Literature Concentration

MA Degree (Plan A/Thesis or Plan C/Comprehensive Exam)

The M.A. Concentration in Literature is recommended for students preparing to teach at the community college level, for those whose objective is to pursue a Ph.D. in literature, or for high school teachers seeking to advance their understanding of literature and literary theory.

The culminating requirement for the Literature Concentration shall normally be the Comprehensive Examination, for which the student will prepare by taking ENGL 500.

Students who have earned a 3.7 GPA or better in 21 units in their graduate program may elect to complete Plan A requirements by writing a thesis, provided they have two faculty willing to read and direct the thesis.

Required Courses (9 Units)
ENGL 200AMethods and Materials of Literary Research3
ENGL 240British Literature3
Select one of the following:3
ENGL 250 series course (American Literature)
ENGL 280 series course (Minority Literature)
Electives (18 Units)
Select 18 units 118
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
ENGL 500Culminating Experience3
Total Units30
1

English elective courses, of which 9 units must be ENGL 200-level literature courses and 9 units may be ENGL 100-level or ENGL 400-level courses.

Composition Concentration

MA Degree (Plan B/Project)

The MA emphasis in Composition is recommended for students preparing to teach writing at the community college level, for those whose objective is to pursue a Ph.D. in composition, or for high school teachers seeking to update their knowledge of composition theory and practice. The course of study leads to an M.A. thesis in composition in which the student undertakes original research in composition under the supervision of a two-person faculty committee.

Required Courses (12 Units)
ENGL 220ATeaching College Composition3
ENGL 220CTopics in Composition Studies3
ENGL 220DTeaching and Composition Research3
ENGL 195AWriting Center Theory and Practice: Internships3
or ENGL 410A Writing Center Theory and Practice: Internships
Other Course Requirements (15 Units)
Select 15 units 115
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
ENGL 500Culminating Experience3
Total Units30
1

English Elective units, of which 9 units must be ENGL 200-level courses and 6 units may be ENGL 100-level or ENGL 400-level courses.

Creative Writing Concentration

MA Degree (Plan C/Comprehensive Exam)

The M.A. emphasis in Creative Writing is recommended for students preparing to teach at the community college level, for those students whose objective is to pursue an M.F.A. or Ph.D. in creative writing, and writers seeking to advance their understanding of creative writing practice and theory.

Required Courses (12 Units)
ENGL 200AMethods and Materials of Literary Research3
ENGL 230XMaster Class in Writing Fiction3
or ENGL 230Y Master Class in Writing Poetry
ENGL 240British Literature3
Select one of the following:3
ENGL 250 series course (American Literature)
ENGL 280 series course (Minority Literature)
Electives (15 Units)
Select 15 units 115
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
ENGL 500Culminating Experience3
Total Units30
1

English elective units of ENGL 100-level and ENGL 200-level courses which must include a minimum of 9 additional units in creative writing courses and a minimum of 6 units in literature courses. At least 6 units in this category must be ENGL 200-level courses.

MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

The MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) requires extensive study of linguistics and pedagogy, as well as actual teaching and/or tutoring experience with second-language students. The culminating experience of the MA TESOL Concentration is the comprehensive examination.

The MA TESOL provides professional preparation and training in the theory and practice of teaching English to non-native speakers. The program is designed for graduate students who expect to teach in community college or secondary or adult education settings in the U.S. or in adult or university level courses overseas. The program is also preparation for the Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics.

Admission Requirements

To ensure that students entering the program have the potential to succeed, both in the program and in their teaching careers, the MA TESOL has the following admission requirements:

  • a baccalaureate degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA, including a 3.0 GPA in the final 60 units;
  • international students must achieve minimum scores on the TOEFL as follows: 600 on the traditional TOEFL, with a score of 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE) OR 250 or higher on the computerized TOEFL, with a score of 5 on the Test of Written English OR 100 or higher on the TOEFL, with a minimum of 24 on the writing section;
  • completion of prerequisite courses (or their equivalents1) with a grade of "B" or better:
    ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
    ENGL 110QEnglish Grammar for ESL Teachers3
  • Students should complete all prerequisites before enrolling in a graduate-level (200 and above) courses. A student who has not completed all prerequisites may be dropped by the instructor from a graduate-level course; and
  • Preference will be given to those students who have completed 2 semesters of college-level foreign language (6 units).
1

Students should see the TESOL Coordinator for a transcript evaluation if they have completed equivalent coursework. Under no circumstances will any coursework more than seven years old be accepted for transfer.

Admission Procedures

Applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Enrollment is limited, so applicants should file as early as possible in the semester prior to intended admittance. Students not meeting all requirements may be conditionally accepted as long as space is available in the program. Applicants must complete a university application by the posted application deadline date for the term applying. For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/. Before applying, students should make an appointment to set up an advising file with the TESOL Advisor.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of graduate study. The procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • a plan of study that has been filled out with the help of the TESOL Advisor;
  • completed at least 12 units of 200-level courses in the Master's Degree program with a "B" or better in each course; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 206, (916) 278-6470. The completed form is then returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

MA TESOL

The MA TESOL requires 33 units of post-baccalaureate coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Up to 3 units of ENGL 299 may apply to the degree. The prerequisites of ENGL 110A, and ENGL 110Q must be completed before 200-level courses are attempted.

Required Courses (27 Units)
ENGL 200DMaterials and Methods of TESOL Research3
ENGL 410BInternship-ESL Teaching3
ENGL 200ECurriculum and Assessment Design for Language Classrooms3
ENGL 210BSociolinguistics and TESOL3
ENGL 210GSecond Language Acquisition3
ENGL 215AReading/Vocabulary Acquisition3
ENGL 215BESL Writing/Composition3
ENGL 215CPedagogical Grammar for TESOL3
ENGL 215DPedagogy of Spoken English3
Electives (3 Units)
Select one of the following: 13
Technology in Second Language Teaching
Teaching College Composition
Topics in Composition Studies
Writing Center Theory and Practice: Internships
Internship in Teaching Writing
Internship in Teaching Adult Reading
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
ENGL 598TCulminating Experience - TESOL3
Total Units33
1

An upper division or graduate course not on this list may be substituted with the prior permission of the graduate coordinator.

Students must complete a thesis, project, or TESOL comprehensive examination. The thesis and project options require permission of the graduate coordinator. Only students with an earned GPA of 3.7 or higher will be given permission to do a thesis or project.

Notes: The MA in TESOL includes the Certificate of Advanced Study in TESOL. Credential candidates may apply for Supplemental Authorization in ESL through the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Candidates for the Adult Education Credential in ESL may apply through their local County Office of Education. An extensive job file for employment in the U.S. and overseas is maintained in the TESOL Program Office, Calaveras Hall 138.

Option B: Certificate - TESOL

The TESOL certificate program has two options:

  • Option A: This option is intended for undergraduates (see English undergraduate page) who want preparation for teaching ESL students (in the U.S. or abroad).
  • Option B: This option is intended primarily for graduate students who want to pursue an MA in English or another field, but also want to be prepared to teach ESL writing at the college level.

Courses must be completed with grades of "B" or better; ENGL 110A and ENGL 110P must be completed before any ENGL 215 course; and ENGL 110Q must be completed before attempting ENGL 215C.

Information on Eligibility for options A and B

Students must either be in a degree program at Sacramento State or must apply for graduate admission to the University. Once admitted to Sacramento State, prospective TESOL Certificate students must apply to the TESOL Coordinator for admission to the program.

Undergraduates must be within 45 units of completing a bachelor's degree (in any field) with a 3.0 overall GPA.

Graduate students must have a completed bachelor's degree (in any field) with a 3.0 overall GPA.

All applicants must complete the University's Writing Placement for Juniors (WPJ) requirement.

International students must have a TOEFL score of 600 or higher (or a score of 250 or higher on the computerized TOEFL) and a score of 5 on the Test of Written English.

Option B: Required Courses (15 Units)
ENGL 110ALinguistics and the English Language3
ENGL 110PSecond Language Learning and Teaching3
ENGL 110QEnglish Grammar for ESL Teachers3
ENGL 215BESL Writing/Composition3
ENGL 410BInternship-ESL Teaching3
Elective (3 Units)
Select one of the following:3
Curriculum and Assessment Design for Language Classrooms
Technology in Second Language Teaching
Reading/Vocabulary Acquisition
Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL
Teaching College Composition
Topics in Composition Studies
Total Units18

Note: Because of the budget constraints, undergraduates and unclassified graduate students can be admitted to TESOL graduate courses on a space available basis only.

Additional Information

  • Optional Support Field: With permission of the Graduate Coordinator, up to 6 of the 30 units required for the MA in English may be taken in fields closely related to English.
  • Important Notice: The University requires that all graduate students admitted in Fall 1980 or later pass the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG).

How to Read Course Descriptions

ENGL 1.     Basic Writing Skills. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Score of 146 and below on English Placement Test or credit in ENGL 15. Department approval required.


Prepares students for the challenging thinking, reading, and writing required in academic discourse. Uses writing as a means for discovery and reflection as well as reading as a source for ideas, discussion, and writing. Concentrates on developing expository essays that communicate clearly, provide adequate levels of detail, maintain overall coherence and focus, and demonstrate awareness of audience and purpose.

Note: May be taken for workload credit toward establishing full-time enrollment status, but is not applicable to the baccalaureate degree.

ENGL 1C.     Critical Thinking and Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in ENGL 1A.


Devoted to the principles of critical thinking and the writing of argumentative essays. Focuses upon formulating defensible statements, evaluating evidence, and applying the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning.

ENGL 1X.     Composition Tutorial. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): ENGL 1A or ENGL 2 or ENGL10 or ENGL 10M or ENGL 11 or ENGL 11M


Offers supplemental instruction in elements of composition and assists students in mastering the writing process with special emphasis on planning and revising essays. Instruction takes place both in traditional classroom setting and in small group and individual tutorials. Students enrolled in this tutorial must also be coenrolled in a first-year composition course as the focus will be drafting and revising the work done in the primary writing course.

Note: May be taken for workload credit toward establishing full-time enrollment status, but is not applicable to the baccalaureate degree.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 3.     Introduction to Academic Discourse. 4 Units


Offers students a rigorous introduction to academic discourse at the college level in the areas of critical reading, critical thinking, academic discussion, and the use of academic research. Concentrates on using expository texts as a foundation for analyzing the rhetorical strategies and effectiveness of an argument. Promotes academic discussion and fosters intellectual curiosity and collaboration.

Note: Receives baccalaureate credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 3M.     Introduction to Academic Discourse for Multilingual Students. 4 Units


Offers multilingual students a rigorous introduction to academic discourse at the college level in the areas of critical reading, critical thinking, academic discussion, and the use of academic research. Concentrates on using expository texts as a foundation for analyzing the rhetorical strategies and effectiveness of an argument. Promotes academic discussion and fosters intellectual curiosity and collaboration.

Note: Receives baccalaureate credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 5.     Accelerated Academic Literacies. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Written Communication (A2)


Intensive, semester-long course to help students use reading, writing, discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth - students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes; read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop metacognitive understandings of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 5M.     Accelerated Academic Literacies - Multilingual. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EPT score of 147 or above, or credit in ENGL 87; EDT score of 2-5.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Written Communication (A2)


Intensive, semester-long course to help multilingual students use reading, writing, discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth - students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes; read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop metacognitive understandings of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 10.     Academic Literacies I. 3 Units


Year-long course (combined with ENGL 11) to help students use reading, writing, discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth - students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes; read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop a metacognitive understanding of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 10M.     Academic Literacies I - Multilingual. 3 Units


Year-long course (combined with ENGL 11M) to help multilingual students use reading, writing, discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes; read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop a metacognitive understanding of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 11.     Academic Literacies II. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 10.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Written Communication (A2)


Continued study (following ENGL 10) to help students use reading, writing, discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth - students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes: read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop a metacognitive understanding of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 11M.     Academic Literacies II-Multilingual. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 10M.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Written Communication (A2)


Continued study (following ENGL 10M) to help multilingual students use reading, writing discussion, and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity, and personal academic growth - students will work in collaborative groups to share, critique, and revise their reading and writing. Students will engage in reading and writing as communal and diverse processes; read and write effectively in and beyond the university; develop a metacognitive understanding of their reading, writing, and thinking processes; and understand that everyone develops and uses multiple discourses.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 15.     College Language Skills. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): Score of 120-141 on the English Placement Test.


Instruction in reading and writing skills. Focuses on the interrelationship of reading and writing, with emphasis on development, organization, and clarity of communication. Lecture three hours; lab two hours.

Note: Utilizes computers.

ENGL 16.     Structure Of English. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1A or equivalent.


Introduction to the terminology and structure of traditional grammar; analysis of the standard rules for agreement, punctuation, pronoun reference, etc.; introduction to social variance with respect to usage-standard vs. non-standard; and a description of the English sound system (vowels and consonants) and its relationship to standard orthography (sound/letter correspondences) spelling rules.

ENGL 20.     College Composition II. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENGL 5 or ENGL 5M OR ENGL 11 or ENGL 11M or equivalent with a C- or better; sophomore standing (must have completed 30 units prior to registration).


Advanced writing that builds upon the critical thinking, reading, and writing processes introduced in ENGL 5 and ENGL 5M. Emphasizes rhetorical awareness by exploring reading and writing within diverse academic contexts with a focus on the situational nature of the standards, values, habits, conventions, and products of composition. Students will research and analyze different disciplinary genres, purposes, and audiences with the goals of understanding how to appropriately shape their writing for different readers and demonstrating this understanding through various written products.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 20M.     College Composition II for Multilingual Students. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 5 or ENGL 5M or equivalent; sophomore standing


Advanced writing for multilingual that builds upon the critical thinking, reading, and writing processes introduced in English 5/5M. Emphasizes rhetorical awareness by exploring reading and writing within diverse academic contexts focusing on the situational nature of the standards, values, habits, conventions, and products of composition. Students will research and analyze different disciplinary genres, purposes, and audiences with the goals of understanding how to appropriately shape their writing for different readers and demonstrating this understanding through various written products.

Note: Writing requirement

ENGL 21.     First Year Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Understanding Personal Development (E)


Introduction to the nature and possible meanings of higher education, and the functions and resources of the University. Designed to help students develop and exercise fundamental academic success strategies and to improve their basic learning skills. Provides students with the opportunity to interact with fellow students and the seminar leader and to build a community of academic and personal support.

ENGL 30A.     Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Units


Workshop for students who have had little or no experience writing fiction or poetry and who are trying to decide if they are interested in becoming writers. Over the course of the semester, students write and polish several poems and short stories which they present for critique and commentary. In addition, they study the basic elements of fiction and poetry and learn how to use these effectively in their own work.

ENGL 30B.     Introduction to Writing Fiction. 3 Units


Workshop for students who have had little or no experience writing fiction. Students write and polish several short stories which they present for critique and commentary. In addition, they study the basic elements of plot, character, description, and dialogue and learn how to use these effectively in their own fiction.

ENGL 30C.     Introduction to Poetry Writing. 3 Units


Designed for lower division students who have little or no experience writing poetry. Students will write approximately twelve poems in a variety of forms and receive instruction and practice in the workshop method. In addition, they study the basic elements of poetic craft: rhythm, enjambment, basic figures of speech, etc., and how to use them effectively in their own poetry.

ENGL 40A.     Introduction to British Literature I. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Major developments in the literature of England from Chaucer through the close of the Augustan Age.

ENGL 40B.     Introduction to British Literature II. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Major developments in the literature of England from the Pre-Romantics and Romantics through the 20th century.

ENGL 50A.     Introduction to American Literature I. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Major developments in the literature of America from the beginnings through the Civil War.

ENGL 50B.     Introduction to American Literature II. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Major developments in American Literature from the end of the Civil War to the present.

ENGL 60.     Reading for Speed and Efficiency. 2 Units


Strategies and techniques to promote greater reading efficiency and flexibility and increase reading speed. Drills to develop rate and comprehension as well as supplementary practice in the LSC reading lab.

Note: Utilizes computers; may be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 60M.     Reading for Speed and Efficiency for Multilingual Students. 2 Units


Strategies and techniques to promote greater reading efficiency and flexibility as well as to increase reading speed for college-level multilingual readers. Classroom instruction includes drills to develop rate and comprehension as well as supplementary practice in the LSC reading lab.

Note: Utilizes computers; May be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 65.     Introduction to World Literatures in English. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


An introduction to world literature written in English that places writers and their works within colonial, post-colonial, and literary contexts. Texts may come from Africa, India, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Canada, and non-English Britain.

ENGL 85.     Grammar for Multilingual Writers. 2 Units


Covers the major systems of English grammar in the context of reading passages and the students' own writing. Practice in editing authentic writing.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 86.     College Language Skills for Multilingual Students. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): Score of 120-141 on the English Placement Test or score of 2 or 3 on the English Diagnostic Test.


Focuses on the interrelationships of reading and writing, with emphasis on development, organization, grammar, and clarity of communication. Lecture three hours; lab two hours.

Note: Utilizes computers.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 87.     Basic Writing Skills for Multilingual Students. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Score of 142-145 on English Placement Test or score of 4 on English Diagnostic Test, or credit in ENGL 86.


Emphasizes writing and language development. Instruction in reading and essay writing, from idea generation to revision and editing.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 90A.     Modern Short Plays. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)

ENGL 97.     Introduction to Film Studies. 3 Units


Examines cinematic techniques, styles, vocabulary, and discourses. Introduces different ways for writing about films and for working with a variety of cinematic terms. Film form and style will be studied by examining specific scenes in films from different genres, nations, and directors. Films used throughout the course will be selected from different historical periods.

Cross-listed: FILM 97.

ENGL 100B.     Literary Theory. 3 Units


Designed to engage students in a productive conversation about the various theories of literature and reading that currently inform Literary Studies. Provides a historical overview of modern theory including, but not limited to, Formalism, Structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Deconstruction, and Feminism. Students are encouraged to apply these theories to their practice of literary criticism and to assess the strengths and weaknesses of each paradigm.

ENGL 100Z.     Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Investigates one or more schools of literary theory or criticism and their application to works of literature and/or film.

Note: May be repeated twice for credit as long as topics vary; Writing Intensive

ENGL 105.     Film Theory and Criticism. 3 Units


Survey of film theory focusing on Auteurism, Class, Expressionism, Formalism, Genre, Gender, Narratology, Neorealism, Phenomenology, Post Structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Realism, Semiology, Structuralism and Third Cinema.

Cross listed: FILM 105.

ENGL 109M.     Writing for GWAR Placement-Multilingual. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 with at least a C- grade or better and have completed at least 60 semester units.


Provides intensive practice in prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing academic writing for multilingual writers. Students research, analyse, reflect on, and write about the kinds of writing produced in academic disciplines. Students produce a considerable amount of writing such as informal reading responses, rhetorical analyses, and an extended academic research project: students will submit their writing late in the semester in a GWAR Portfolio, from which they will receive a GWAR Placement.

ENGL 109W.     Writing for GWAR Placement. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): English 20 with a C- grade or better and have completed at least 60 semester units.


Provides intensive practice in prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing academic writing. Students research, analyse, reflect on, and write about the kinds of writing produced in academic disciplines. Students produce a considerable amount of writing such as informal reading responses, rhetorical analyses, and an extended academic research project: students will submit their writing late in the semester in a GWAR Portfolio, from which they will receive a GWAR Placement.

ENGL 109X.     Writing-Intensive Workshop. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Writing Placement for Juniors: student who receive a 4-unit placement on the WPJ.

Corequisite(s): Writing-Intensive upper-division course.


Student-centered group tutorial which will offer supplemental instruction in elements of academic writing taught in writing-intensive upper-division courses; it will provide support to students concurrently enrolled in writing-intensive upper-division courses throughout the writing process, including drafting, revising, and editing, for a variety of papers.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 110A.     Linguistics and the English Language. 3 Units


Survey of modern English and the basic concepts of modern linguistics. Students will learn how linguists view regularity in language, as exemplified by data from English. Students will also learn how English spelling is an imperfect representation of sounds, how the sound system of English operates, how words and sentences are formed and may be analyzed, how the language changes over time, space, and social setting, and how the language is learned by children and adults.

ENGL 110B.     History of the English Language. 3 Units


Survey of the linguistic and social history of the English language, tracing its growth from a minor dialect of the Germanic family to one of the most widely spoken languages of the world. Topics include structural change in the language, vocabulary growth, and variation in English around the world.

ENGL 110C.     Technology in Second Language Teaching. 3 Units


Prepares language teachers to effectively integrate technology into classrooms. Examines theoretical rationales for using computer-assisted language learning, the range of uses of technology in classrooms, and best practice. Develops students' technological literacy and ability to critically evaluate computer-assisted language teaching materials.

ENGL 110J.     Traditional Grammar and Standard Usage. 3 Units


Develops a thorough understanding of basic issues in traditional English grammar and usage. It emphasizes knowledge of traditional grammar needed by single-subject credential students expecting to teach high school English. Topics include parts of speech, functions of words in sentences, phrases and clauses, and punctuation. Students will learn to apply their knowledge of grammar in composition instruction and marking essays. Students will also study use of specific grammatical features in developing rhetorical styles.

ENGL 110P.     Second Language Learning and Teaching. 3 Units


Surveys the major issues involved in the acquisition of second languages and in teaching second language (L2) students. Topics covered include differences between first and second language acquisition, including age, biology, cognitive styles, personality, sociocultural factors, and linguistic variables; in addition, various models, techniques and approaches to L2 teaching are covered. Special attention is given to the unique demographics and characteristics of language minority students in California's public schools.

ENGL 110Q.     English Grammar for ESL Teachers. 3 Units


A survey of those aspects of English grammar that are relevant to teaching second language learners of English. The emphasis is on elements of simple and complex sentences, particularly the structure of noun phrases, the meanings of verb forms, and the expression of adverbial meanings.

ENGL 116A.     Studies in Applied Linguistics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.


Students learn the basics of the English system of phonology and morphology. Takes an integrated approach synthesizing the issues of phonics, schemata-building, and whole language strategies in teaching reading and writing to young learners. Students will also learn the importance of first and second language acquisition for elementary school students.Evaluation will include classroom examinations, and students will also undertake a detailed case study of one child learning to read and write.

ENGL 116B.     Children's Literary Classics. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.


Introduction to the rich profusion of children's literature from a variety of cultures and countries and provides the opportunity to respond to this literature creatively and personally. Students will become familiar with the basic terminology of literary analysis -- themes, irony, point-of-view, etc.-- in order to deepen and enrich their experiences with the fiction, drama, and poetry available to young people. The readings are balanced for gender, culture, and ethnic concerns.

ENGL 120A.     Advanced Composition. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.


An intensive writing workshop in which student writing is the focus. Students will engage in a writing process that will include feedback from peers and the instructor throughout the process. This writing process may occur in a variety of rhetorical situations and genres. Through reflection on their writing products and processes, students will gain an awareness of themselves as writers. By the end of the course students will complete an extensive research project focused on academic inquiry.

Note: ENGL 120A is a requirement for English majors.

ENGL 120C.     Topics in Composition. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 or ENGL 120A.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Offers a rotating series of topics relevant to composition studies, such as technology-based writing, writing across the curriculum, critical literacy, etc. Introduces students to the theory and practice of the field under consideration. Regardless of the topics, students will explore the major scholarly works of the field and produce writing that analyzes and utilizes the concepts in the area under consideration.

Note: May be repeated for credit as long as topic differs.

ENGL 120P.     Professional Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 or ENGL 120A.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Teaches students the most common professional writing genres used in career fields ranging from business to public relations to nonprofit management. Focuses on how business or technical communication is different from academic styles and introduces students to the current writing challenges and practices in these fields. Students will gain instruction and practice composing various essential writing formats, such as memos, reports, and feasibility studies.

ENGL 120R.     Topics in Rhetoric. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 or ENGL 120A.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Offers a rotating series of topics relevant to rhetorical studies, such as digital rhetoric, cultural rhetorics, contemporary rhetorical theories, etc. Introduces students to the theory and practice of the field under consideration. Regardless of the topic, students will explore the major scholarly works of the field and produce writing that analyzes and utilizes the concepts in the area under consideration.

Note: May be repeated for credit as long as topic differs.

ENGL 120S.     Writing in the Social Sciences. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09, WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109 M/W.


Introduces principles of analyzing and composing texts appropriate for various social science disciplines. Provides practice in analyzing texts in social science journals and in writing abstracts, summaries, and literature reviews. Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate students and beginning graduate students in TESOL and in other social science programs (e.g., psychology, sociology, anthropology, etc.)

ENGL 120X.     MLA and APA Style Guides. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): ENGL 120A, ENGL 198T, a Writing Intensive course, or instructor permission.


Students will learn how to format papers, cite sources, and integrate in-text citations into their work according to MLA and APA formatting and style guides.

ENGL 121.     Writing Center Tutoring. 1 Unit


One-on-one tutoring in reading and writing at the University Writing Center. Student writers will meet with assigned tutor an hour a week. Topics could include understanding assignments, prewriting, revising, reading strategies, editing strategies, integrating research, etc. Students must sign up for a regular tutoring session time during week two of the semester at the University Writing Center.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 125A.     Literature and Film for Adolescents. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 or 120A


Provides prospective secondary school English teachers with an opportunity to think through important issues related to the planning and implementation of literature programs for adolescents. Equal emphasis will be given to the study of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama, and film. The focus will embrace literature from a variety of cultures and periods.

ENGL 125B.     Writing and the Young Writer. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 20 or ENGL 120A; and ENGL 110J or ENGL 110Q or ENGL 16


Provides an introduction to teaching writing in high school and operates on the assumption that the need for and impact of writing competence for students is interdisciplinary and pervasive. The class has a workshop format, and students will practice many of the strategies studied. The texts will cover theoretical issues in teaching composition and practical methods of implementing theory in public school classrooms.

ENGL 125E.     Academic Reading and Writing for Second Language Students. 3 Units


Helps prospective teachers to better understand the unique needs of second language students. Covers second language acquisition theory with particular emphasis on the teaching of reading and writing for academic purposes. Practical skills covered will all focus on the particular needs of second language readers and writers, for instance, how to help them to read more efficiently and with greater comprehension, how to write more fluently and accurately in ways that meet the needs and expectations of the academic discourse community.

ENGL 125F.     Teaching Oral Skills. 3 Units


Provide students with both the necessary background knowledge as well as the specific pedagogical tools for promoting proficiency in spoken interaction, listening skills, and pronunciation in second language/foreign language contexts, specifically, English as a Second Language (ESL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

ENGL 130A.     Intermediate Fiction Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30B.


Workshop for students who already have some experience writing short stories. Students write and polish several stories which they present for critique and commentary. They also take an in-depth look at the theory and craft of fiction-writing, analyze the stories of contemporary writers from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and learn how to apply what they have learned to their own writing.

ENGL 130B.     Intermediate Poetry Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30C.


Designed for students interested in developing their poetic expression beyond the basics covered in ENGL 30A and ENGL 30C. Emphasizes practice and experimentation with meters, verse forms, and figures of speech. Focal points for analysis and discussion will be poems and essays by contemporary poets of various aesthetic orientations, as well as work produced by members of the class.

ENGL 130C.     Special Topics in Poetry Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30C.


Provides students with further opportunity to refine their poetic craft beyond the levels achieved in 30C and 130B. Emphasizes further experimentation with meters, verse forms, and figures of speech as well as questioning the "rules" of poetry and encouraging students to blur or defy the boundaries of genre. Focal points for analysis and discussion will be poems and essays by contemporary poets of various aesthetic orientations, as well as work produced by members of the class.

Note: May be repeated twice for credit assuming the topic is different.

ENGL 130D.     Meter and Rhythm. 3 Units


Offers an in-depth study of prosody including the principles of meter (line measurement) and scansion (the marking of stressed syllables to determine meter and rhythm), as well as examining the relationship of these principles to verse in English. Examines a variety of poetic schemes, tropes, and forms. Three hours, lecture and guided practice.

ENGL 130F.     Writing For Television. 3 Units


Focuses on training students in video literacy and script writing for the video explosion: educational media, documentaries, and interactive programs.

ENGL 130G.     Between Genres: Flash Fiction/Prose Poetry. 3 Units


Offers undergraduate poets and fiction writers the opportunity to explore/experiment with the long-standing anti-genre of the poetry/fiction hybrid. For 200 years writers around the world have noted the symbiosis between the genres of poetry and prose. Currently, some of America's most exciting writers are currently exploring the margins between prose poetry, flash fiction, and related evolving forms. Prerequsite: ENGL 30A, ENGL 30B, or ENGL 30C.

ENGL 130J.     Writing Feature Filmscripts. 3 Units


Workshop designed for students who have little or no previous experience writing for the screen. Students write the synopsis, treatment, and part of the master scene script for a feature film, all of which are polished and revised in a workshop setting. Special attention is given to the dynamics of plot, characterization, and dialogue with an emphasis on the difference between writing for film and writing other kinds of fiction.

ENGL 130M.     Art of Autobiography. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): At least a C- grade in ENGL 30A or 30B, and GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Arts (Area C1), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Students keep a journal and write several drafts of an autobiographical essay which they present for critique and commentary. They also read and analyze several biographies and journals by writers from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

ENGL 130N.     Creative Non-Fiction. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30B.


Students write several non-fiction pieces which may include (but are not limited to) autobiography, memoir, nature-writing, travel writing, and literary memoir. Students need not previously have had fiction-writing experience to take this course, but they must be prepared to write literary non-fiction of high quality.

ENGL 130W.     Advanced Poetry Writing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30C


Theory and practice in the writing of poetry at the advanced level. Consists primarily of the preparation and evaluation of student work. Students arc also assigned supplemental readings designed to help them determine their affinity (or lack of affinity) with current poetic theory and practice.

ENGL 130Y.     Creative Writing for Young Audiences. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 30A or ENGL 30C


In this creative writing course students will learn how to write children's literature in a wide array of genres, including picture book texts, early readers, poetry, and middle grade and young adult novels. The course will give an overview of these genres and through portfolio assignments allow students to sample different genres and gain expertise in one particular genre.

ENGL 140.     Studies in British Literature. 3 Units


Topics in periods and movements in the literature of England.

ENGL 140A.     Introduction to Old English. 3 Units


Study of the grammar of Old English with particular attention to its survival in the modern language. Shows students how to use their instincts as native speakers of Modern English to acquire a good working sense of the original form of the language. Readings in biblical and historical texts will be supplemented by an introduction to Old English paleography which will allow students to access literature in the original.

ENGL 140B.     Medieval Literature. 3 Units


Survey of English literature from 1100 to 1500. Students will read texts from the various genres of Middle English literature--romance, lyric, ballad, lay, drama, history--in the dialects of origin. Focuses on how medieval thought both differs from and anticipates modern thought.

ENGL 140C.     The English Renaissance. 3 Units


English Renaissance refers to exploration, experimentation, and creativity during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in England. The poets, playwrights, and prose writers of the age include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Spenser, Donne, Bacon, Sidney, and Milton. Explores, discusses, and analyzes representative works by figures of the age--including prose and poetry--making connections between the writers and the cultural context in which they worked.

ENGL 140E.     Restoration Comedy. 3 Units


In-depth examination of the drama of late 17th century England, a drama which revolutionized the British theater and whose influence is still very much with us. It includes the study of the age itself, the social and political issues of the time as well as its art, specifically its comedies of manners, which it examines in their historical context as immediate descendants of Jacobean drama and progenitors of the Sentimental comedy of the 18th century.

ENGL 140F.     The Golden Age Of Satire. 3 Units


Covers the period from 1680 to 1745, focusing on the major works of England's greatest satirists: John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, John Gay, William Hogarth (the painter), and Alexander Pope. It begins with a general discussion of the nature and purpose of satire.

ENGL 140G.     Birth of the British Novel. 3 Units


The novel as we know it today was invented in the 18th century. Students study the origins of the novel and read several major works of 18th-century British fiction, such as Defoe's Moll Flanders, Richardson's Clarissa, Fielding's Tom Jones, Sterne's Tristram Shandy, and Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Students also study Samuel Johnson who, though not a novelist, was perhaps the greatest prose writer of the period.

ENGL 140H.     Nineteenth Century Novel. 3 Units


Devoted to exploring the fiction of nineteenth-century British novelists from Jane Austen through Thomas Hardy. Particular attention is paid to prevalent genres, especially the mixing of romance and realism, narrative and plot structures, imagery patterns, character types and anti-types, and thematic concerns, which usually involve some sort of conflict between the self and society, the individual and institutions (or the environment).

ENGL 140I.     British Romanticism. 3 Units


Examines British literature and culture during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Topics may include war and revolution, tourism and the picturesque, genius and imagination, the Gothic, Romanic orientalism and literature and the environment. Writers covered may include Smith, Blake, Wollstonecraft, the Wordsworths, Scott, Coleridge, Austen, de Quincey, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans and Keats.

ENGL 140J.     The Victorian Imagination. 3 Units


Explores themes and forms of the Victorian period, stressing the evolving role of the artist and the growth of self-consciousness in verse and prose. Victorian themes like the divided self, the love-duty conflict, and the inevitable crises of faith are recurring problems in the obsessive Victorian debate between flesh and spirit. Analyzes this dialectic in the poetry of Browning, Tennyson, the Pre-Raphaelites and Decadents, in a representative novel, and in the prose of Ruskin, Mill, and Pater.

ENGL 140K.     Modern British Literature, 1900-Present. 3 Units


In-depth examination of some of the important British texts in fiction, poetry, and drama from 1900 to the present. The works dramatize the important historical, social and aesthetic changes in a century which saw the collapse of the British Empire, the spread of democracy, the rise of Modernism and the Absurd in the arts, and the continuing struggle of the personal statement in an impersonal world.

ENGL 140L.     Modern British Fiction, 1900-Present. 3 Units


Survey of British fiction from 1900 to the present which covers the struggle between traditional Realism and Modernism in the novel, the decline and fall of the British Empire and the rise of the former colonies as purveyors of fictions in English in their own right, and the development of new experimental forms in the last decades of the 20th century.

ENGL 140M.     Modern British Drama, 1889-Present. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), Arts (Area C1)


In-depth examination of British drama from the arrival of Ibsen's The Doll House on the British stage (and Shaw's publication of his influential treatise The Quintessence of Ibsenism) both laying to rest for serious artists the moralistic, bourgeois theater of the late 19th century. Includes study of various dramatic movements in England --including realism, absurdism, kitchen-sink naturalism, surrealism, epic theater, expressionism. Prerequisite:GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

ENGL 140R.     Renaissance Drama. 3 Units


Readings in and analysis of English drama written in the period, roughly, from 1500-1660. Provides a survey of playwrights and genres from the entire period or focus on a particular theme or a grouping of authors. Students will come to understand the texts as well as the variety of historical, political, cultural, social, sexual, and religious contexts in which the playwrights of the era composed their works.

ENGL 141A.     The Essential Shakespeare. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), Arts (Area C1)


Non-technical approach to Shakespeare's most representative dramatic works, designed for the non-major. Focuses upon Shakespeare's typical themes, conventions, and techniques, his development of character and situation, and his relationship to the culture and values of both his own and subsequent ages.

ENGL 141B.     Shakespop: Shakespeare and Popular Culture. 3 Units


The works of William Shakespeare circulate in our culture in a wide variety of ways - in music, art, dance, film, television, advertising, management manuals, self-help books, etc. sometimes staying close to the original texts and at other times barley skimming the surface for cultural capital. This course will examine the dynamic relationships between Shakespeare in its diverse forms and popular culture by examining various instances of Shakespearean appropriation and adaptation. Themes include Shakespeare in Love, War, Business, and Youth Culture.

ENGL 145A.     Chaucer - Canterbury Tales. 3 Units


Reading of The Canterbury Tales in Middle English. Chaucer's great unfinished poem will be investigated as the pinnacle of literary achievement in the English Middle Ages, a work that attempts, like Dante's Divine Comedy, to account for all the issues and problems of human life as medieval thinkers had come to regard them.

ENGL 145B.     Shakespeare - Early Plays, 1592-1600. 3 Units


Exploration of representative plays from roughly the first half of Shakespeare's career as a dramatist, including early and middle comedies (e.g., A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It), early and middle tragedies (e.g. Richard II, Henry IV, Part One), while situating the plays within their cultural and historical context.)

ENGL 145C.     Shakespeare - Later Plays, 1600-1612. 3 Units


Exploration of representative plays from roughly the second half of Shakespeare's career as a dramatist, with emphasis on the major tragedies (Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth), but also including the middle comedies (e.g., Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure) and the later romances (e.g., The Winter's Tale, The Tempest), while situating the plays within their cultural and historic context.

ENGL 145I.     John Milton. 3 Units


Students study the major poems of Milton-among them Comus, "Lycidas," Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes-giving special attention to Paradise Lost. Students will also consider such prose works as Of Education, the divorce tracts, and Areopagitica, Milton's famous argument against censorship. Finally, it includes lectures on the Puritan Revolution of 1640-60 and Milton's role in it.

ENGL 150A.     Early American Literature. 3 Units


Focusing on the literature of early American settlement, the literature that first defined our nation. Students analyze such works as oral literature of Native America, earliest writings of Spanish explorers, Puritan settlement literature, Captivity Narratives of the 17th through 19th centuries, Witchcraft Narratives, and Slave Narratives. Students might also study connections to later works (e.g., Puritan literature and Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, Witchcraft narratives and Miller's The Crucible).

ENGL 150B.     American Romanticism. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Focuses on one of the great periods in the history of literature. It has appropriately been called the American Renaissance. Writers covered might include but not be limited to Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson.

ENGL 150C.     American Realism. 3 Units


Examines American literature written during the period after the Civil War, a time of unprecedented change that transformed America from rural, agricultural, and homogeneous culture into its urban, industrial, heterogeneous counterpart. It investigates how the literature of this period reflected these changes and simultaneously tried to reconcile them with the values of an earlier America. The magnitude of this endeavor produced a remarkable literary heritage for the 20th century.

ENGL 150D.     Early Modern Fiction, 1910-1950. 3 Units


Survey of the important historical movements and conflicts in American literature, including the development of Realism and Naturalism, the experimental Modernist movement of the twenties, the populist literature of the thirties and the development of psychological realism in the forties.

ENGL 150E.     American Poetry, 1910-1950. 3 Units


Many scholars argue that American literature's greatest achievement in the twentieth century literature is in the genre of poetry. Offers a survey of such movements as the "New Poetry," Modernism, Imagism, Primitivism, and Postmodernism. Major figures will include, but not be limited to, Robinson, Frost, Eliot, Pound, Millay, Cummings, Stevens, W.C. Williams, Jeffers, Moore, and Hughes.

ENGL 150F.     Contemporary American Fiction, 1950-Present. 3 Units


Surveys American fiction in the decades immediately following World War II. These novels deal with themes such as exhaustion, social unrest, historical conspiracy, and political coercion. Representative figures include, but are not limited to, Ralph Ellison, John Barth, Philip Roth, Joan Didion, Thomas Berger, Vladimir Nabokov, Marilynne Robinson, Thomas Pynchon.

ENGL 150G.     Contemporary American Poetry, 1950-Present. 3 Units


Examines the richness of American poetry since World War II giving some consideration to the impact of recent world poetry brought to us by our skillful poet/translators.

ENGL 150H.     Recent American Fiction, 1980-Present. 3 Units


Introduction to the remarkable flowering of American fiction in the late decades of the twentieth century. The primary focus is to scrutinize a collection of novels for which there is no firmly established critical opinion but which are nonetheless distinguished fictional accomplishments. Emphasis is placed on revealing the diversity of voices and the ways in which these writers demonstrate the continuing possibilities for artistic variety and experimentation.

ENGL 150I.     Modern American Short Story. 3 Units


Since the publication of Washington Irving's "Legend of Sleepy Hollow," Americans have excelled at the genre of the short story. Offers a survey of traditional "masters" and recent innovators. Provides an opportunity to read a wide variety of writers (such as Wharton, Chopin, Crane, Gilman, James, Anderson, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, O'Connor, Barth, Oates, Proulx, Roth, Carvey, and Welty) , and examine a range of forms, themes and experiences that reflect and shape American culture.

ENGL 150J.     Twentieth Century American Drama. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Arts (Area C1)


In-depth examination of American drama, starting with Eugene O'Neill. Traces American drama from the turn-of-the-century to the present, examining the plays themselves--their themes, dramatic idioms, stage craft and European influences--in their social, historical and artistic contexts.

ENGL 150L.     Lost Generation Writers. 3 Units


Examines one of the most remarkable flowerings of literary achievement in American letters, the writing of "The Lost Generation," authors born between 1885 and 1900. Unified by a profound disillusionment with American culture after World War I, writers such as T.S. Eliot, Eugene O'Neill, William Faulkner, and Ernest Hemingway produced enduring modern masterpieces. In the process they demonstrated that their generation might find in art what had been lost on the battlefield.

ENGL 150M.     California Fiction. 3 Units


Focuses on the California phenomenon--the place where the American dream can reach fulfillment--and how this phenomenon has captivated writers for decades. Presents a cross-section of this fiction, examining the various literary manifestations of the California phenomenon.

ENGL 150P.     The American Gothic. 3 Units


Explores American works written in the Gothic mode. In novels, captivity narratives, short stories, and poetry, we will investigate representations of terrifying, uncanny, and supernatural phenomena. As we trace the development of the Gothic mode in American literature, we will examine how narratives and poetic depictions of horror rehearse our individual and cultural fears about sexuality, race, violation, rebellion, madness, and death, and we will inquire into that thrill of macabre pleasure that attends the exploration of the darker side of life.

ENGL 150R.     American Regionalism. 3 Units


Examines literature by American regionalist writers during the late-nineteenth century. Topics may include nationalism, sectional divides, local color, dialect fiction, conditions of publication, and emerging women writers and writers of color. Students will investigate the role that regionalism plays in relation to literary representations that depict the conflicting and complex social, cultural, and historical formation of racialized and gendered identities.

ENGL 155E.     Hemingway and Fitzgerald. 3 Units


Intensive study of two of the most important American writers of the 20th century: Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. This focus on two authors allows students to read them in-depth, to examine the dynamics of their friendship, and to explore the similarities and differences in their responses to World War I and the Great Depression.

ENGL 165A.     A Survey of Irish Literature. 3 Units


Survey of Irish literature, beginning with various myths, moving through the bardic period and eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and then centering upon the "Irish Renaissance" (1885-1940).Covers the genres of poetry, drama, and fiction, and representative figures include W.B. Yeats, Patrick Kavanagh, James Joyce, Flann O'Brien, John Synge, Lady Gregory, Sean O'Casey, Sean O'Faolain, and Frank O'Connor.

ENGL 165D.     Postcolonial Literature. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Deals with the considerable body of Postcolonial literature written in English. Many of the writers come from countries of the former British Commonwealth, including Achebe, Desai, Emccheta, Naipaul, and Rushdie. It focuses on the literary, cultural and political environments in which the texts are situated and on their relationship to the wider tradition of literature in English.

ENGL 165F.     Caribbean Literature. 3 Units


Focuses on the literature--novels, shorts stories, poetry, and plays--by a wide range of Caribbean authors, among whom are two recent Nobel Prize winners, Derek Walcott and V. S. Naipaul. Students will learn to appreciate the cultural diversity of this post-colonial literature and will become familiar with its important themes and stylistic techniques. Students will also experience the multi-dialectal richness and flavor of the Anglophone Caribbean as expressed by authors from linguistically diverse islands.

ENGL 170A.     Fantasy. 3 Units


Helps students develop their own working definition of fantasy by examining its central narrative and dramatic structures, image patters, and thematic preoccupations. At the same time, encourages students to compare these motifs with those of so called "realist" fiction so they may understand how blurred conventional distinctions between "fantasy" and "reality" actually are.

ENGL 170D.     Drama. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.


Offers a survey of dramatic literature--tragedy, comedy, tragi-comedy--with plays both modern and classical. Since plays are meant to be seen as well as read, several selections will be available on video to deepen understanding and enjoyment. Focus is on analysis of genre, theme, structure, and interpretation of the plays. A term project based on one live performance in Sacramento is also included.

ENGL 170E.     Short Fiction. 3 Units


Survey of the art of short fiction through readings of a variety of world writers. Representative figures include, but are not limited to, Hawthorne, Melville, Joyce, James, Hemingway, Atwood, O'Connor, Boyle, Cather, Faulkner, Jackson, etc.

ENGL 170G.     Modern Poetry. 3 Units


General course in English language poetry written in the late 19th and early 20th century poetry, a period of great innovation in poetry. It focuses on approach: what is the modern poem and how does one read it? Emphasis is placed on the function of image, voice, line break, rhythm, etc. Writers might include Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Hardy, and Hopkins.

ENGL 170H.     Introduction To Comedy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Focuses on various comic genres and theories--from 4th century BC to the present. It examines romantic comedy, tragicomedy, comedies of manners, of humors, of menace; farce, satire, slapstick. Students also read widely in comic theory, examining aspects psychological, phenomenological, aesthetic--in drama, fiction, poetry and prose.

ENGL 170I.     Introduction To Tragedy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Focuses on the literatures and theories of tragedy--from 5th century BC to the present--from Sophocles to Mamet, from Flaubert to Stoppard. It examines the "tragic vision" in light of individual genres, times, social mores, religious beliefs and expectations, using Aristotle for both its touchstone and lodestar.

ENGL 170K.     Masters of the Short Story. 3 Units


Concentrates on the works of a few distinguished writers of short fiction. In each case the writer is one with a widely acknowledged reputation. Emphasis is upon exploring how writers shape and manipulate the genre to produce lasting, individual, distinctive works. Representative figures include, but are not limited to, James Joyce, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, Frank O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, John Barth, D.H. Lawrence, and Eudora Welty.

ENGL 170M.     Literatures Of Sexuality. 3 Units


Examines the relation between sexuality and literature, exploring different conceptions of sexuality over time and across cultures and the rhetorical strategies employed in representations of sexuality in literary texts. Topics may include the modern connection between sexuality and identity; the links between nation, race, and sexuality; and the treatment of homosexuality and women's sexuality. Throughout, careful attention will be paid to the literary forms and discursive strategies (e.g., the confessional mode, modern scientific discourses) used to represent sexuality.

ENGL 170N.     Narrative Poetry. 3 Units


Provides an introduction to the genre of narrative poetry, a historical survey of the vicissitudes of its reception from the nineteenth century to the present, and a close study of representative narrative poems by poets who have excelled in this mode.

ENGL 170Z.     Twentieth Century Fiction. 3 Units

ENGL 180A.     Forms of African-American Poetry. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), Humanities (Area C2)


Focuses on four or more African-American poets, representing a historical succession of literary periods.

ENGL 180B.     Forms of African-American Fiction. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+ or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Focuses on four or more African-American writers of fiction, surveying texts representing a historical succession of literary periods.

ENGL 180F.     Major African-American Authors. 3 Units


Employing a lecture-discussion format, involves studies in a single literary genre or a combination of literary genres emphasizing the work of three or fewer African-American authors.

ENGL 180H.     American Identities: In the Intersection of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Humanities (Area C2)


Uses a team-teaching approach to sample a range of diverse American literatures. Texts are selected by the team to represent both mainstream and marginalized groups and to reflect the individual professors' interests and expertise. Examines the commonalities that cross ethnic, racial, class, and gender boundaries as well as the differences that enrich our cultural identity.

ENGL 180J.     Jewish American Literature. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Students will examine a rich tradition of Jewish American literature in the context of a complex American multicultural narrative. Topics include the immigrant experience, assimilation, alienation, responses to the Holocaust and other forms of anti-Semitism, the place of Israel in the Jewish American imagination, and a contemporary rediscovery of reconstruction of Jewishness and Judaism. Students will interrogate what constitutes Jewish American identity and defines its literature in a culture that is itself conflicted about its secular/religious ethos and the degree to which subjectivity is determined by "consent and/or descent."

ENGL 180L.     Chicano Literature. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Gives students an overview of Chicano Literature. Students examine both contemporary Chicano poetry and fiction.

ENGL 180M.     Asian American Literature. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Designed to help students gain an understanding of the diversity as well as the similarities among various Asian American writers. How do the categories of race, gender, and class affect the way different characters construct their cultural experiences and fashion their personal identities? By studying the variety of processes through which different protagonists "become American"--through assimilation, appropriation, or "translation"--students should arrive at a better understanding of how we all construct our own identities. Prerequisite:GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

ENGL 180Z.     Topics in Multi-Ethnic Literatures. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Comparative analysis of two or more ethnic literary and cultural productions with an emphasis on relationships among history, politics, and culture in American, British, or World literatures.

Note: May be repeated twice for credit as topics vary.

ENGL 185B.     Twentieth Century Fiction by Women. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Covers short stories and novels spanning the century and including women writers from a variety of nationalities, class, cultural and ethnic groups. Emphasizes what Virginia Woolf calls "the delicate transaction between a writer and the spirit of the age" and works with the writers presented so as to elicit the developing strands of influence and critique that bring these disparate writers into a common dialogue.

ENGL 185C.     British Women Novelists. 3 Units


Focuses on the ways in which women writers of the 19th and 20th centuries concern themselves with questions of the differences in male and female experience and how those differences affect their writing. Students will study the portrayal in fiction of the evolution of the "modern woman"--with the conflicts between self and other, dependence and independence, love and power that are part of that process.

ENGL 185D.     American Women Writers. 3 Units


Focuses on women writers primarily from the early 20th century with an emphasis on how gender expectations affect people, society, novels, poems. Students study the theme of awakening, the roles that families, friends, class, social expectations and conditions play in the development of individuality and self-awareness. Examines implications of power relationships and certain areas of conflict, such as those between self and other, repression and expression, inner and outer, dependence and independence, love and power.

ENGL 190D.     Detective Fiction. 3 Units


Readings in and analysis of crime and detective fictions (novels, short stories, plays, etc.). Crime fiction continually asks us what do we know about people and events and how do we know it. Investigates a variety of texts that address this desire to know and its connections to the mysterious and the criminal. Discussions of this popular genre will address the ways in which an obsession with crime and punishment manifests itself in various cultures and cultural moments.

ENGL 190H.     The Supernatural in Literature. 3 Units


Approaches supernatural literature from the perspective that, regardless of how bizarre or fantastical a literary work may seem, it deserves serious scholarly study because it represents the realism of apparent human experiences and provides readers with access to the inner workings of the human mind. Readings include Ambrose Bierce, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, Lord Dunsany, Fitz-James O'Brien, and contemporary writers from around the world.

ENGL 190J.     Tolkien: Lord of the Rings. 3 Units


Helps students understand the primary structures, images, and themes informing Tolkien's Middle Earth and the ways these link the medieval worldview with modern, and even postmodern, wish-and fear-fulfillments. Students will read Tolkien's criticism, poetry, short tales, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and selections from The Silmarillion.

ENGL 190P.     Popular Literature and Culture. 3 Units


The study of popular texts through the various lenses of literary analysis. Students will work with a variety of texts, which might include genre fiction, graphic novels and comics, film and television, and other digital media, to consider the ways and whys of their popularity, as well as their impact, both historical and contemporaneous, on literature, audience, and culture.

ENGL 190Q.     Gay and Lesbian Literature. 3 Units


Readings in and analysis of literature by and about lesbians and gay men. Students will work with a variety of texts (fiction, poetry, film, nonfiction) about gay and lesbian identity; at the same time, students will come to understand the historical contexts and shifting theoretical paradigms that have shaped and reshaped conceptions of sexuality.

ENGL 190R.     Romance Fiction. 3 Units


Readings in and analysis of romance fictions (primarily novels). Romances continually promise emotional (and sexual) fulfillment, but what do readers of romance novels get from this reading experience? Discussions of this popular genre will address the ways in which the pursuit of love and companionship and the indulgence in lust and passion manifest themselves in various cultural moments; critical materials will help theorize the appeals, dangers, and uses of romance fiction.

ENGL 190V.     Great Drama on Video. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR Certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W.


Studies and evaluates a selection of dramas on videos, such as but not limited to A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Doll's House, Hamlet, Oedipus, Pygmalion, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

ENGL 191A.     Masterpieces of the Cinema. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Arts (Area C1)


Conducted by lecture and discussion. Students see a selection of the best, most enduring, most influential films made during the last hundred years and explore the historic, aesthetic, and philosophical reasons these films have generally been acknowledged as masterpieces.

ENGL 195A.     Writing Center Theory and Practice: Internships. 3 Units

Note: May be repeated for 6 units of credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 195C.     Internship In Field Work. 3 Units

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 195W.     Writing Programs Internship. 3 Units


Students will work with a Composition faculty member to complete a project for the campus writing programs. The internship may involve the composition program, the University Reading and Writing Center, the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement, or the Writing Across the Curriculum Program. Students should contact the appropriate coordinator to register for the course and design a project.

ENGL 197A.     Film -- Horror, Comedy, Science-Fiction. 3 Units


Major genres of the cinema conducted by lecture and discussion. Students see a selection of films from the major genres including (but not limited to) horror, science fiction, and comedy; learn about the history and development of each genre; and explore the commercial, aesthetic, social, and philosophical forces that have shaped the major film genres.

ENGL 197G.     Films of Great Directors. 3 Units


Focuses on the role of the director in the creation of excellent films. Students will view, analyze, and discuss memorable films by great directors, concentrating on their personal styles, cinematic strategies, and typical themes. Representative examples will include such filmmakers as Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Welles, Ford, Truffaut, Bunuel, Kurosawa, Hitchcock, Bergman, and others.

ENGL 197I.     Film - Depression Giggles. 3 Units

ENGL 197K.     Fiction Into Film. 3 Units


Students see a selection of films adapted from novels, short stories, or other literary works; read the original work from which the film was adapted; and explore the history, aesthetics, and craft of adapting fiction to film.

ENGL 197L.     The American Film. 3 Units


Focus on American films. Topics may cover a range of periods, movements, genres, styles and issues

ENGL 197M.     Recent American Films. 3 Units


Emphasizes the trends, themes, forms, and cinematic techniques, technological advances, and "revisionist" genres of recent American films of approximately the last twenty years, partly as a way of analyzing the American film conventions, partly as a means of examining our contemporary culture, but primarily as a means of analyzing and understanding the films themselves.

ENGL 197P.     British Film. 3 Units


Screenings and analysis of films produced in Great Britain. Students will view a variety of British films, starting possibly with silents and early Hitchcock and ending with films from the contemporary moment. Students will come to understand the historical and artistic contexts of the films and encounter the shifting definitions of what represents "British" on the screens of the cinema and in the minds of viewers. May provide a survey of films or focus on particular themes, studios, or directors.

ENGL 197R.     Films Of Alfred Hitchcock. 3 Units


Traces Hitchcock's "game with the audience" from its beginnings in silent films, through its British period, to its American conclusion. It closely examines important sequences, shots, images, character types, and themes. Students will view several of Hitchcock's classic films in their entirety.

ENGL 198T.     Senior Seminar In English. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 120A and a minimum of 90 units.


Features specialized topics taught by a variety of instructors depending upon the semester. Topics can include subject matter from literature, linguistics, English education, creative writing, composition/rhetoric, and film. Tend to the production of a significant research paper, a paper which will emphasize the student's ability to: Analyze and interpret multiple texts; Integrate primary and secondary sources; Construct a sustained, coherent, and rhetorically sophisticated piece of writing.

ENGL 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units


Individual projects or directed reading.

Note: Departmental petition required.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 200.     Methods and Materials of English Studies. 3 Units


Required for all MA candidates in English.

ENGL 200A.     Methods and Materials of Literary Research. 3 Units


Required of all MA candidates in English under Plans A and C and Creative Writing Plan B, acquaints students with principal sources and techniques of literary research. It also introduces students to contemporary critical approaches to literature. Students should take this course as early as possible in their graduate careers, preferably in the first semester. Students prepare an annotated bibliography and a paper employing a particular critical approach to one of a selection of anchor texts.

Note: Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course.

ENGL 200D.     Materials and Methods of TESOL Research. 3 Units


Explores research design and testing methods for quantitative and qualitative research in second language acquisition (SLA). Students develop the ability to read second language acquisition research critically; study a variety of theoretical perspectives represented in current SLA research; and review the history of the current "burning issues" in SLA.

Note: Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course.

ENGL 200E.     Curriculum and Assessment Design for Language Classrooms. 3 Units


Examine the interplay between curriculum design and classroom assessment. The goals are 1) to familiarize prospective teachers with the terminology and practices underlying curriculum design and classroom assessment; 2) to develop the ability to analyze student needs and propose appropriate changes to curricula; and 3) to construct and implement language tests that reflect curricula.

Note: May be counted as an elective for the M.A. TESOL program.

ENGL 201D.     Contemporary Theory. 3 Units

ENGL 210B.     Sociolinguistics and TESOL. 3 Units

ENGL 210C.     Technology in Second Language Teaching. 3 Units


Prepares language teachers to effectively integrate technology into classrooms. Examines theoretical rationales for using computer-assisted language learning, the range of uses of technology in classrooms, and best practice. Develops students' technological literacy and ability to critically evaluate computer-assisted language teaching materials.

ENGL 210G.     Second Language Acquisition. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 200D.


Examines the factors affecting the acquisition of a second language, focusing on research in this area since 1970. Topics covered are: transfer and the role of the first language; developmental sequences; the role of input, interaction and output; cognitive and personality variables, including age; and the role of formal instruction and error correction.

ENGL 215A.     Reading/Vocabulary Acquisition. 3 Units


Preparation of teachers of English to speakers of other languages. Examines the psycholinguistic bases of the reading process in ESL, provides opportunities for seminars to test reading practices in peer demonstrations, and explores the fundamentals of testing, evaluation, and syllabus design in the ESL curriculum. Particular attention for reading and vocabulary will be given to miscue analysis and acquisition theory.

ENGL 215B.     ESL Writing/Composition. 3 Units


Provides the groundwork to prepare teachers of English to speakers of other languages for composition instruction. An examination of the theoretical bases of language acquisition, composing process, and correction/revision strategies that will enable students to plan and demonstrate writing lessons to their peers. Consideration of traditional tests of writing, such as the TOEFL, the WPJ, and innovative forms of evaluation are integrated with syllabus design and text evaluation.

ENGL 215C.     Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL. 3 Units


Examines those areas of English grammar that are typically taught to non-native speakers. The goals are 1) to familiarize prospective ESL teachers with terminology and analyses that can be used in the classroom; 2) to develop the ability to explain and exemplify grammatical phenomena in terms accessible to ESL students; 3) to review sample materials and techniques for teaching English grammar to non-native speakers.

ENGL 215D.     Pedagogy of Spoken English. 3 Units


Examines aspects of spoken English that are typically taught to non-native speakers. The goals are 1) to familiarize prospective ESL teachers with terminology and analyses that can be used in the classroom; 2) to develop the ability to analyze student difficulties and provide appropriate help; 3) to review sample materials and techniques for teaching spoken English to non-native speakers.

ENGL 220A.     Teaching College Composition. 3 Units


Designed for prospective community college and university writing instructors. It focuses on theory and research in rhetoric, composition, and cognitive development and on practical, pedagogical classroom strategies. Students discuss a variety of theories and research studies and then apply writing theory to classroom strategies, design lessons, assignments, and syllabi, and practice analyzing and responding to student writing; and prepare a teacher portfolio.

Note: Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course.

ENGL 220C.     Topics in Composition Studies. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 220A.


Rotating series of topics relevant to composition studies. Regardless of the topic, students will explore the history of the field, the theory and practice of the field, the major scholarly works of the field, and the relationship of the field of study to the broader field of composition and rhetoric.

Note: May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

ENGL 220D.     Teaching and Composition Research. 3 Units


Examines the history and current status of research methods and methodologies in Composition Studies. It explores both producing and consuming research -- studying how and why research has been conducted and how it has been understood and put to practical use by readers of composition research.

ENGL 220R.     Topics in Rhetorical Theory and Practice. 3 Units


Designed to help students learn about and apply rhetorical theory. Its goal is to introduce graduate students to the history and theory of rhetorical movements after--or outside of--the rhetorics of Western antiquity. Evaluation will be based on weekly journal responses to readings, a major paper on rhetorical theories, and a course portfolio.

Note: May be repeated if topic differs.

ENGL 220W.     Writing in Your Discipline. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate GWAR placement Score of 40 or a GWI course grade of "B-" or lower


Writing workshop course designed to immerse graduate students in the discourse of their disciplines; required for graduate students who have received a 3 unit placement on the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG). Focuses on the writing process, text-based academic writing in various academic genres, revising, and editing. Students will produce 5000 words. Includes assessment via Course Portfolio.

ENGL 225A.     Theories of Teaching Literature. 3 Units


Introduction to theories of teaching literature so students who intend to teach at the college level have examined their assumptions and options before they develop their teaching practices. Organized around three questions: Why do we teach literature? What do we teach? How do we teach?

ENGL 225C.     Theoretical Issues in Adult Literacies. 3 Units


Introduces students to current theories surrounding the pedagogies and politics of adult literacies within a wide variety of contexts, including community colleges, prisons, and community projects. Incorporates information on technological literacies, information literacies, cultural literacies, and multiliteracies. In addition, students will be partnered with community literacy experts and required to complete formal observations of adult reading classrooms throughout the semester, fostering collaboration between the local community and the university.

Cross-listed: EDTE 225C; only one may be counted for credit.

ENGL 230A.     Writing Fiction. 3 Units


Seminar in the workshop format designed for experienced writers of fiction. It is designed to provide intensive instruction in the theory and craft of writing short stories, novels, and screenplays.

Note: Topic areas will vary by semester, and the course may be repeated.

ENGL 230B.     Advanced Poetry Writing. 3 Units


Theory and practice in the writing of poetry. Consists primarily of the preparation and evaluation of student work. Students are also be assigned supplemental readings designed to help them determine their affinity (or lack of affinity) with current poetic theory and practice.

Note: May be repeated for credit

ENGL 230D.     Meter and Rhythm. 3 Units


In-depth study of prosody including the principles of meter (line measurement) and scansion (the marking of stressed and unstressed syllables to determine meter and rhythm), as well as examining the relationship of these principles to verse in English. Examines a variety of poetic schemes, tropes, and forms. Lecture and guided practice.

ENGL 230E.     Writing and Theorizing Memoir. 3 Units


Examines the craft of writing memoir and creative nonfiction as well as the theory and history of contemporary memoir writing. Students will write and workshop their own memoirs and creative nonfiction. Introduces students to literary and philosophical theories of memory and writing as well as look at contemporary memoirs written in a variety of styles.

Note: Topic areas will vary by semester, and the course may be repeated.

ENGL 230G.     Between Genres: Flash Fiction/Prose Poetry. 3 Units


English 230G offers graduate poets and fiction writers the opportunity to explore/experiment with the long-standing anti-genre of the poetry/fiction hybrid. For 200 years writers around the world have noted the symbiosis between the genres of poetry and prose. Currently, some of America's most exciting writers are currently exploring the margins between prose poetry, flash fiction, and related evolving forms.

ENGL 230X.     Master Class in Writing Fiction. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 130A, or ENGL 130M, or ENGL 130N, or ENGL 230A or instructor permission.


Workshop provides intensive instruction in the theory and craft of writing fiction designed for students who are already writing at a professional or near-professional level, and for those who have proven themselves ready to take advanced study with careful, individualized direction of the instructor.

Note: May be repeated for credit

ENGL 230Y.     Master Class in Writing Poetry. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 130B or ENGL 230B or instructor permission.


Designed to provide intensive practice in the techniques and problems of writing poetry. It is aimed at students interested in creative writing, those who have already done significant work and who have proven themselves ready to take advanced study with careful individualized direction of the instructor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 240.     British Literature. 3 Units


Seminars in British literature.

ENGL 240A.     Chaucer. 3 Units


Investigation of the body of Chaucer's poetry, seen against the backdrop of the late 14th century.

ENGL 240B.     The World and the Flesh: Victorian Fiction. 3 Units


Explores the Divided-Self of Victorian fiction, a consciousness split between word and flesh, duty and love, society and the self, or most generally between one's public role and one's private needs. Such polar themes affect several fictional genres such as the Pastoral, Gothic, Bildunsroman, Historical Novel and Naturalism. The word and flesh dialectic also informs the narrative structure of Victorian fiction.

ENGL 240E.     Major 18th Century Novelists. 3 Units


Focuses on individual novelists, pairs of novelists, or thematic groupings. Might include works of fiction by authors such as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Steme, Goldsmith, Bumey.

ENGL 240F.     Dickens and Thackeray. 3 Units


Dickens and Thackeray dominated the popular mind as the novelists of the age; no other novelists are more representative of their age and yet can claim to have risen above it. Concentrates on just a few of their novels. Students study the writers and their novels in the context of English society in the 19th century.

ENGL 240G.     Yeats, Kavanagh and Heaney: Ireland's Modern Irish Poets. 3 Units


Yeats, often considered a modernist and a poet in the British tradition, saw himself primarily as an Irish poet working within distinctly Irish literary traditions. Focuses on Yeats' conception of a national, ethnic poetry and the effect that mission had on Ireland's other two major 20th century poets--Kavanagh and Heaney. Students analyze Yeats' most influential work; Kavanagh and Heaney are studied in terms of their debt to Yeats and their individual expressions of national consciousness.

ENGL 240H.     DH Lawrence. 3 Units


Lawrence was immensely original. Like Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, Lawrence is a prophetic visionary intensely concerned to articulate and embody an all-embracing, profoundly existential, vision of life. Examines Lawrence's work closely after a brief exploration of modernism and Lawrence's relation to it and an examination of how conditions in post-Victorian England and events in Europe in the early 20th century contributed to the making of Lawrence's world view and his role as a controversial outsider.

ENGL 240I.     Jane Austen. 3 Units


Focuses on Jane Austen, perhaps England's greatest novelist. Students read almost all of her work and trace the development of her art from her teenage years until her death in 1817, noting how each new book is a distinct departure from previous ones. To put Austen's achievement in perspective, students also read Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, one of Austen's severest critics. Comparing the two novelists provides an even clearer sense of the richness and subtlety of Austen's art.

ENGL 240J.     James Joyce. 3 Units


James Joyce is a monument among twentieth century writers. His masterful Ulysses and other intricate works have kept generations of critics in business. Examines his major fictions, studying them in relationship to the life out of which they grew.

ENGL 240K.     English Renaissance Drama. 3 Units


Sense of exploration, discovery, experimentation, creativity, and moral complexity of the Renaissance era in England (roughly 1550 to 1660) is reflected in the variety and number of plays written by Shakespeare's predecessors, contemporaries, and successors. Following introductory material on the development of the drama in England, students analyze Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrights, exclusive of Shakespeare. Emphasis is on the forms and themes of the plays, with application of "New Historicism" and attention to Renaissance backgrounds

ENGL 240L.     Conrad and Greene. 3 Units


When English critic F.R. Leavis declared that the great English novelists were Austen, Eliot, James, and Conrad, he emphasized these writers' intensely moral pre-occupation. No modern novelist has been more influenced by Conrad than Graham Greene, whose work has the same romantic subject matter and concerns with ethical judgments. Both writers are concerned with the question: to act or not to act, for either choice has inescapable ethical consequences.

ENGL 240M.     The Gothic Novel. 3 Units


Examines the origins and development of the Gothic Novel in England. Attention is paid to recurring structures and themes such as architecture, the use of a narrative frame, reader identification figure, the divided self, the relationships between sex, violence, and death, the wasteland motif, and existential concerns. Special attention is given to the role of the reader and his or her response to the novels.

ENGL 240N.     Arthurian Literature. 3 Units


Study of Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages from its origins to Thomas Malory.

ENGL 240O.     Satire In Age Swift+Pope. 3 Units

ENGL 240R.     Charles Dickens. 3 Units


Examines the major narrative, plot, and genre structures, image patterns, and thematic preoccupations in Dickens' novels, like the interrelationships between homes, prisons, factories and schools. The influences of Dickens' life, periodical publishing of illustrated magazines, and of Victorian society also receives attention. Introduces students to relevant insights of several "post-structural" critical schools, including those of deconstruction, the carnivalesque, liminality, and Lacanian psychology.

ENGL 240S.     Modern Irish Fiction. 3 Units


Examines in detail one aspect of the Irish Renaissance (approximately 1880-1940)--Ireland's contribution to fiction in the twentieth century. Also examines not only individual writers and works but the development of the genres of the novel and short story and movements such as realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism. Writers might include Joyce, O'Brien, O'Flaherty, O'Faolain, and others.

ENGL 240T.     Renaissance Literature. 3 Units


Students will explore the poetry, prose, and drama produced in England during the 16th and 17th centuries. Contemporary criticism and theory will provide a context for reading these primary works.

ENGL 240U.     Nineteenth-Century Texts and Sex. 3 Units


Examines a range of sexual identities through which nineteenth-century Britons imagined their lives. Such identities were influenced by ideas about race, class, status, ethnicity, gender, and age that often differed markedly from our own. Moves beyond the literary to look at texts from a variety of genres (medical, literary, erotic, and autobiographical) and cover both well-treated and more obscure texts.

ENGL 240X.     Contemporary British Fiction--1980 to Present. 3 Units


Students read and study British works of fiction-novels and short stories-written after 1979. Although the choice of authors and works might vary from one semester to another, focuses on works of fiction deemed significant and valuable by literary scholars and critics.

ENGL 240Z.     Special Topics in British Literature. 3 Units


Open to the investigation of either a limited period (e.g. World War I poets or Victorian Children's literature), a single author (e.g. Hanif Kureishi or Aphra Behn), an authorial dialogue (e.g. Chaucer & Spenser, Stoppard and Shakespeare, Sidney & Wroth), or a unique literary feature, theme, or structure (e.g. Pastoral & Georgic or Empire & Race).

ENGL 245A.     Shakespearean Romance. 3 Units

ENGL 250A.     Wharton and Cather. 3 Units


Focuses on the writing of Edith Wharton and Willa Cather, two of our most accomplished early American writers. Shows how these writers, poised on the threshold of the twentieth century-and pulled simultaneously forward and back-explored similar themes, and how, as two of the few revered women writers of this time, they focused particularly on shifting gender roles; Wharton with her eye on interior space and Cather with her eye on exterior space.

ENGL 250D.     Hawthorne and Melville. 3 Units


Readings and discussion of major works by Hawthorne and Melville.

ENGL 250F.     Whitman and Dickinson. 3 Units


This seminar on two of America's greatest poets, Whitman and Dickinson, focuses primarily on the poetry, but also on letters and prose pieces. Students read and discuss criticism on each writer, and study cultural and historical contexts of these two contemporaneous but antithetical poets. Study includes traditional and feminist studies of Dickinson and Cultural Studies of Whitman. Forms a dialogue between these two remarkable and remarkably different poets; students join in that dialogue.

ENGL 250H.     Major American Realists. 3 Units


The period between the end of the Civil War and the outbreak of World War I was a time of unprecedented and transforming change in American life. In response to these new conditions came "the rise of realism," which radically changed American ideas about the nature of fiction, the reality it represented, and its effects on readers. Students study theories of realism, their historical development and the current status of literary theories of realism as influenced by deconstruction and feminist literary theory. These theoretical positions are applied to a range of short fiction and novels.

ENGL 250J.     Henry James. 3 Units


James' innovations in narrative technique paved the way for the emergence of the modern novel; his development of a theory of fiction helped establish an American literary tradition and bring the American novel into the mainstream of British and European literature. Students read James' major works of fiction and criticism with an eye to understanding and enjoying them and to assessing the nature of the writer's contribution to the novel as a serious art form.

ENGL 250K.     Contemporary American Fiction. 3 Units


Studying contemporary fiction involves challenges and pleasures. Unlike studies in most areas of literature where the best writers have been clearly established, studying contemporary fiction means risking one's own critical skills to identify what new texts and writers are significant without the help of earlier generations of scholars and critics.

ENGL 250L.     American Women Writers. 3 Units


Focuses on the contributions of women writers to American literature. Begins with a brief overview of feminist critical approaches and of the history of women writing in America. Close critical analysis of texts focuses on four or five writers from various centuries, regions, and ethnic groups. Covers such writers as Toni Morrison, Sarah Jewett, Marilynne Robinson, Eudora Welty, Lee Smith, Leslie Silko, and others. Students work collaboratively to present background information and critical approaches to the writers.

ENGL 250P.     Wharton and Chopin. 3 Units


Growth of a feminine perspective in literary theory has resulted in a radical reconsideration of the American literary canon, producing new readings of texts, patterns in literature and culture, and connections between texts. Wharton and Chopin are two writers taking a place of importance in the development of the realistic novel in America and in the creation of a distinctive tradition of women's literature. Focuses on the heuristic possibilities of a distinctly different literature by women, the role of gender, and the contributions of Wharton and Chopin to the novel.

ENGL 250Q.     Irish-American Fiction. 3 Units


Examines the theme of immigration and that of assimilation in a particular ethnic group: Irish-Americans. Through an examination of the literature, we find an ethnicity that is uneasily part of the American fabric and one defined to a large degree by the culture they either abandoned or were forced to abandon. Representative writers include Eugene O'Neill, Alice McDermott, William Kenney, Mary Gordon, John Gregory Dunne.

ENGL 250R.     Wm. Faulkner: Major Fict. 3 Units

ENGL 250T.     Postmodern Fiction. 3 Units


Study of important recent fiction that has come to be referred to as "postmodernist" because its non-traditional themes, subject matter, and narrative technique embody or reflect the postmodern era.

ENGL 250U.     Roaring Twenties Literature. 3 Units


Focus on literature dramatizing the roaring, irrepressible twenties, a decade of unprecedented change following the "Great War to end all wars." Highlighting Fitzgerald, whose life mirrors the times, also includes other "expatriate" writers such as Wharton, Dos Passos, Stein, Eliot, and Hemingway, who looked at America from an overseas perspective and reflected on the changes in communication, sensibility, and values resulting from the new freedom of this revolutionary, liminal period.

ENGL 250V.     Cultural Studies. 3 Units


Surveys the range of contemporary cultural phenomena and the relevant modes of analysis currently employed in the widespread practice generally referred to as Cultural Studies.

ENGL 250W.     The Poetry of T.S. Eliot. 3 Units


Focuses on the poetry of T.S. Eliot, one of the dominating figures of English and American literature for a substantial part of the twentieth century: In 1948 he received the Nobel Prize for Literature, and by 1950 his authority had reached a level that seemed comparable in English writing to that of figures like Johnson and Coleridge. Offers students the opportunity to analyze and discuss Eliot's poems. We will trace his poetic/aesthetic development from his early poems ("Prufrock" et al.) to his epoch-making The Waste Land, and onward through his conversion to Anglicanism and his mature accomplishment of Four Quartets.

ENGL 250Z.     Special Topics in American Literature. 3 Units


The investigation of either a limited period (e.g. The Transcendental period or the Novel of the 1960s), a single author (e.g., Philip Roth or Toni Morrison), or a unique literary feature or structure (e.g. Literary Naturalism or the Experimental Novel).

ENGL 260A.     Myth Criticism. 3 Units


Introduces and traces through several literary works and genres the fundamental topics in myth criticism; significance of ritual, fairy tales, and archetypal romance forms; contributions of Freudian, Lacanian, and Jungian psychology and their relation to Joseph Campbell's notion of the monomyth; relevance of Victor Turner's "liminal" theories of rites of passage in anthropology; importance of recent discoveries with the bicameral and "triune" brain in biological sciences; kinds of myth (hero, heroine, American, love, wasteland, artist, time); and relationships between myth criticism and post-structuralism.

ENGL 260D.     Literature and Biography. 3 Units

ENGL 265A.     Postcolonial Literature. 3 Units


Focuses on contemporary literary works from postcolonial locations such as Africa, Australia, South Asia, Canada and the Caribbean. Explores the relationships between literary texts and the historical and social contexts from which they arise; especially European colonialism.

ENGL 275.     Seminar in Literary History. 3 Units


Literary history designed to introduce the graduate student to bibliographical materials necessary to the successful pursuit of advanced study in English. It will deal with the major historical periods of English and American literature, and looks briefly at the major European traditions.

ENGL 280A.     Aesthetics of Minority Literature. 3 Units

ENGL 280B.     The Ethics of Black Verbal Aesthetics. 3 Units


Survey of the interaction between aesthetics and ethics in African-American literature. Emphasizing a call-and-response verbal aesthetic-prominent in the oral traditions of segregated communities throughout the African Diaspora-as an extension of a diasporic ethics of improvisational black identity that, especially late twentieth century literature recovers as basis for challenging the fixed, essentialist ethoi and aesthetics of earlier African-American literature more greatly influenced by traditional, Christian-Humanist discourses on ethnicity.

ENGL 280J.     Jewish American Literature. 3 Units


Students will examine a rich tradition of Jewish American literature in the context of a complex American multicultural narrative. Topics include the immigrant experience, assimilation, alienation, responses to the Holocaust and other forms of anti-Semitism, the place of Israel in the Jewish American imagination, and a contemporary rediscovery or reconstruction of Jewishness and Judaism. Students will interrogate what constitutes Jewish American identity and defines its literature in a culture that is itself conflicted about its secular/religious ethos and the degree to which subjectivity is determined by "consent and/or descent.

ENGL 297A.     Prose Style In Literature. 3 Units

ENGL 299.     Special Problems: English Tutorial. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 200.


Individual projects or directed reading. Highly recommended for, and open only to, students who are able to carry on individual tutorial study. Admission by approval of faculty member who is to act as tutor and of graduate advisor or of Department Chair.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410A.     Writing Center Theory and Practice: Internships. 3 Units

Note: May be repeated for up to 6 units of credit.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410B.     Internship-ESL Teaching. 3 Units


Provides interns with an opportunity to experience the day-to-day life of an ESL class. Tutors will observe an ESL class, will assist the teacher in conducting various aspects of the class, and will be responsible for planning and teaching at least one class session. Seminar meetings will provide and overview of ESL teaching methodology.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410C.     Internships. 3 Units

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410E.     Internship in Teaching Writing. 3 Units


Students considering a teaching career intern in a composition class at an area community college. They work with a mentor teacher on site and meet periodically at CSUS. The internship provides students with an opportunity to experience the day-to-day life of a composition class and hands-on opportunity to design assignments, respond to student writing, conduct class discussions, etc. Students read composition and rhetorical theory with an eye toward day-to-day application in the classroom.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410F.     Internship in Teaching Literature. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Recommended: either ENGL 225 or ENGL 220A and instructor permission.

Corequisite(s): Recommended: either ENGL 225 or ENGL 220A.


Gives graduate students the opportunity to gain teaching experience in a literature classroom. Students will work closely with an instructor-of-record in a large (60+) lecture literature course and in small group discussion sessions under the supervision of the internship coordinator. Interns will also meet periodically with their peers to discuss pedagogical issues and readings as they pertain to their experiences in the classroom.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410L.     Internship in Teaching Adult Reading. 3 Units


Tutoring in adult reading. Tutors work with students who need reading instruction at Sacramento State, local community colleges or adult education agencies in the Sacramento area.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 410W.     Writing Programs Internship. 3 Units


Students will work with a Composition faculty member to complete a project for the campus writing program, the University Reading and Writing Center, the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement, or the Writing Across the Curriculum Program. Students should contact the appropriate program coordinator to register for the course and design a project.

Credit/No Credit

ENGL 500.     Culminating Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy and permission of the graduate coordinator.


Completion of a thesis, project, comprehensive examination or TESOL comprehensive.

ENGL 598T.     Culminating Experience - TESOL. 3 Units


Completion of a thesis, project, or TESOL comprehensive exam. Requires advancement to candidacy and permission of graduate coordinator. Project and thesis options require GPA of 3.7.