Undergraduate Studies in Education

College of Education

Child Development

Child Development is the study of the physical, socio-emotional, and cognitive growth and development of the child from conception through adolescence. The purposes of this major are to provide a sound academic program in Child Development and prepare students to work with children and families in a variety of school and community settings.

Child Development students pursue careers in elementary school teaching; preschool teaching and administration; child-care and after-school employment; parent education; community college teaching; or work with a variety of counseling, social service and community agencies. The undergraduate major also prepares students for graduate studies in child development, elementary or special education, human development, social work or counseling.

American Sign Language and Deaf Studies

American Sign Language and Deaf Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of deaf and hard-of-hearing people in American and world society. The program promotes the understanding of the deaf community as a linguistic and cultural group and encourages students to analyze existing stereotypes and policies relating to deaf and hard-of-hearing people in order to work both within their own communities and others in affecting change for the betterment of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.

With an ASL and Deaf Studies Minor, students may obtain entry-level jobs in settings working with the deaf such as residential supervisor, classroom aide, vocational trainer, and much more. Students may also combine an ASL and Deaf Studies Minor with a related major field of study such as education, counseling, audiology and speech therapy for a more well-rounded grounding in the issues relating to the deaf and hard-of-hearing in their field. Students in fields which are not specifically deaf-related such as nursing, law, computer engineering, and many more may also experience an edge in gaining employment, whether in deaf-related settings or not, with a minor in ASL and Deaf Studies compared to those without similar coursework or experience.

Further, students having completed the ASL and Deaf Studies Minor may be able to waive similar coursework at other universities with specialized fields of study relating to deafness that may not be offered in the Sacramento region.

Career and Technical Studies

This program is designed to provide training for adults who wish to train/teach in a career technical/business program in public institutions or private business settings. The Bachelor's degree includes the Designated Subjects Teaching Credential in Career Technical Education or Adult Education and the Supervision and Coordination Credential. The program is offered on weekends and uses instructional techniques suited to adult learners.

This program is offered through the College of Continuing Education while its academic home is in the Branch of Undergraduate Studies in Education in the College of Education. It is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC), the California State University Chancellor's Office, and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

Degree Programs

BA in American Sign Language/Deaf Studies

BA in Child Development (Early Development, Care, and Education)

BA in Child Development (Elementary Pre-Credential)

BA in Child Development (Individualized)

BA in Child Development (Integrated Pre-Credential Subject Matter Program)

BA in Child Development (Social and Community Settings)

BS in Career and Technical Studies

Minor in American Sign Language/Deaf Studies

Minor in Bilingual/Multicultural Education

Minor in Child Development

Minor in Counseling

Minor in Teacher Education (Teaching, Equity, and Engagement)

Career Possibilities

Deaf Studies majors and minors can enter careers in both public and private sectors. Students may combine an ASL/Deaf Studies Major with a related Minor field of study such as Education, Counseling, Audiology, or Speech Therapy. Deaf Studies will provide students with a well-rounded grounding in the issues relating to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in their fields. Students pursuing careers in the areas of health services, legal advocacy, and social services may also experience an edge in gaining employment.

Teacher in regional occupation programs, private post-secondary institutions, community colleges, correctional facilities and adult schools · Trainers and facilitators in public or private industry · School and career counselors · Human resource recruiters and placement personnel · Mediators and labor relations specialists · Educational administrators · School-to-work coordinators · Learning specialists · Administrators, managers and supervisors in public or private industry · Small business owners and entrepreneurs · Consultants in business, industry, and education

Contact Information

Karen Davis O’Hara, Chair, Undergraduate Studies in Education
Phillip Booth, Administrative Support Coordinator II
Eureka Hall 401
(916) 278-6639
Email the Department of Undergraduate Studies in Education

Sherrie Carinci, BSCTS Faculty Coordinator
College of Education
Eureka Hall 406
(916) 278-3496
College of Education Website

Faculty

ALEXANDER, KRISTEN

DAVIS-O'HARA, KAREN

GARCIA-NEVAREZ, ANA

GORDON-BIDDLE, KIMBERLY

GRUSHKIN, DONALD

HEMBREE, SHERI

HOROBIN, KAREN

STONE, LYNDA

SUN, LI-LING

LEE, DIANE

PIENG, PATRICK

RAYMAN, JENNIFER

VICARS, WILLIAM

How to Read Course Descriptions

CHDV 23.     Assessment and Observation in Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30, or CHDV 35, or equivalent

Purposes of and methodological issues involved in assessing and observing early child development and learning in educational and developmental settings. Topics include selection of appropriate observation methods, survey of standardized measures, ethics, and interpretation and implications of assessment data for teaching and learning. Focus will be on becoming objective and unbiased observers, use of both informal and formal assessment tools, and principles of observational assessment research. Students will be required to complete up to 10 hours of observation outside of class. APA style will be introduced to support the development of practical and scholarly communication and writing.

CHDV 30.     Human Development. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Understanding Personal Development (E)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Interdisciplinary study of human development with practical observations. Addresses physical, socio-cultural, intellectual and emotional aspects of growth and development from conception to death. A variety of field experiences will be required.

CHDV 31.     Adult Supervision and Mentoring In Early Childhood Programs. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent.

Term Typically Offered: Spring only

Study of research and exemplary practices in the supervision of early childhood teachers, other program staff, parents and volunteers. Content emphasizes adult learning.

CHDV 32.     Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent.

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

Basic issues, procedures and practices in the administration and supervision of public and private schools. Requires administrative supervisory fieldwork in an early childhood program.

CHDV 35.     Child and Adolescent Development. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Understanding Personal Development (E)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of theory and research on cognitive, social and physical human development from conception through adolescence. Content will include data-collection techniques such as observation. Some course material will be applied to an analysis of elementary schooling.

CHDV 35F.     Human Development and Elementary Field Experience. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): Completion of or enrollment in CHDV 35.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Directed field experiences in elementary school settings. Students are required to work at an elementary school and attend an on campus seminar. Includes the integration of student field experiences with theory and research in Human Development. Issues in learning, social development, adult career selection and schooling will be explored.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 44.     Community Service Learning in Developmental and Educational Settings. 1 - 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Designed to provide a range of service learning experiences where students apply their academic knowledge and skills in community-based settings. The community-based experiences will be combined with classroom activities designed to develop student understanding of topics related to their service activities such as tutoring reading and math, mentoring students from disadvantaged backgrounds, working with special populations of children.

Note: May be taken up to four times for credit (maximum 12 units of credit).

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 123.     Qualitative Methods in Human Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30, or CHDV 35, or equivalent

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to qualitative research methods and their philosophical underpinnings. The focus will be on theoretical, methodological, and ethical issues in studying human learning and developmental processes from interpretive and social constructivist perspectives. Attention given to methodological strategies used to document and analyze learning and development in context. Strategies include participant-observation field notes, interviews, audio/video recordings, documents, and artifacts, with implications for theory, policy, and practice. APA style will be introduced to support the development of scholarly communication and writing.

Note: For CHDV majors, must be taken prior to completion of 90 units; completion of 45 total units credit.

CHDV 130.     Parent Education. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Ways parent education may be conducted in Child Development programs to meet legislated requirements as well as parent needs. Attention will be given to parent education programs which serve children of different ages, diverse language and cultural backgrounds, and children with special needs. The rights and responsibilities of children, parents and teachers will be discussed. Discussion and participation in such classroom activities as panels, presentations, demonstrations and cooperative learning assignments.

CHDV 131.     Language Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133. CHDV 133 may be taken concurrently.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Investigation of the development of language and its relationship to school learning, cognitive development and social development. Both linguistic and communication competence are included. Specific attention to second language acquisition and principles underlying effective instruction in linguistically diverse children.

Note: Topic areas will vary by semester, and the course may be repeated.

CHDV 132.     Fieldwork in Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 123

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Directed field experiences in settings selected to meet students' experience and needs. Students are required to work at the selected setting and attend an on-campus seminar to explore developmental content and issues. Discussion will also focus on attention to professional development and ethics in community and educational settings working with children and families.

Note: May be taken as a core requirement and repeated as an elective.

CHDV 133.     Quantitative Methods in Human Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30, or CHDV 35, or equivalent

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to quantitative research methods in human development and their philosophical underpinnings. Major topics include the structures, design and conduct of research inquiry, and the generation of research questions and hypotheses, and collection of data. Emphasis will also be on engaging in quantitative research as well as increasing students' ability to locate, understand, critique, and report research findings. Students will be challenged to think critically about methodological issues in quantitative research. AP A style will be introduced to support the development of scholarly communication and writing.

Note: For CHDV majors, must be taken prior to completion of 90 units; completion of 45 total units credit.

CHDV 134.     Development of Young Children as Mathematical and Scientific Thinkers. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent.

Term Typically Offered: Summer only

Theory, research, and practice in development of the child's thinking about mathematical and scientific concepts. Topics will include: (a) early emergence of conceptual reasoning connected with mathematics and science, (b) symbolic development and language of mathematics and science, (c) developmental sequences in mathematical and scientific thinking, (d) California Preschool Learning Foundations; (e) age-appropriate and culturally-relevant experiences to promote mathematic and scientific reasoning. Activities include lecture, discussions, presentations, cooperative learning assignments, and integration of course content with early childhood classroom practice.

CHDV 135.     Crosscultural Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133. CHDV 133 may be taken concurrently.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive development in children from a crosscultural orientation. Will investigate cultural variables that influence child development from both inter- and intranational perspectives. Discussion of culturally universal and culturally specific behaviors, cognitions and experiences will be covered.

CHDV 136.     Developmental Experiences, Methods and Curriculum. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 123. CHDV 123 may be taken concurrently.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of theory, research, and exemplary practices and programs for children through elementary school. Activities include discussions, presentations, demonstrations and cooperative learning assignments.

CHDV 137.     Cognitive Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 137L.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Cognitive development of children from conception through adolescence with consideration of biological and environmental influences. Lectures, discussions and participation in such classroom activities as presentations, demonstrations and cooperative learning assignments.

Note: Student must co-enroll in the corresponding section of CHDV 137L.

CHDV 137L.     Cognitive Development Research Laboratory. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 137.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Laboratory course to complement CHDV 137. Emphasis placed on the observation, interaction, documentation, and using a scientific approach to learn about cognitive development. Classroom, field, and research experiences supporting the study of cognitive development.

Note: Student must co-enroll in the corresponding section of CHDV 137.

CHDV 138.     Social and Emotional Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 138L.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Study of the social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence with consideration of biological and environmental influences. Lectures, discussions and participation in such classroom activities as presentations, demonstrations and cooperative learning assignments.

Note: Student must co-enroll in the corresponding section of CHDV 138L.

CHDV 138L.     Social and Emotional Development Laboratory. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 138.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Laboratory course to complement CHDV 138. Emphasis placed on the nature of observation, interaction, and using a scientific approach to learn about social and emotional development. Classroom and field experiences related to the study of social and emotional development.

Note: Student must co-enroll in the corresponding section of CHDV 138.

CHDV 139.     Educational Play: Theory and Practice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent

Term Typically Offered: Summer only

Use of play as an educational vehicle in early childhood. Discovering how play helps children develop physically, socially, emotionally, cognitively and creatively through a variety of playful modes. Constructing appropriate developmental play materials and activities with emphasis on the active role of the adult in child's play. Activities include discussions, presentations, demonstrations and cooperative learning assignments.

CHDV 140.     Coordination of Early Childhood Programs. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Advanced methodology of coordinating early childhood programs, to include organization, staff development and community relations. Includes the functions of parents, aides, volunteers and varied early childhood organizational patterns.

CHDV 141.     History of Childhood: International and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of what it means to be a child in today's world by comparing social constructions of childhood across the broad historical periods and in contrasting parts of the world. Exploration of cultural beliefs, values and practices of childhood in different historical, social, and economic contexts. Comparative approach provides a critical framework from which to analyze scholarly inquiry about how children develop in families, schools, and broader society. Course content will interest students from a broad array of majors.

CHDV 143.     Mind and Brain in Developmental Context. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30/CHDV 35, Introductory Biology, and GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Further Studies in Area B (B5), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Investigation of the biological processes underlying child development, from conception through adolescence. Emphasis will be on the genetic, neurological, and endocrine processes related to cognition, social, and emotional development. Students will explore the bidirectional nature of psychobiological processes, with specific emphasis on the psychobiological mechanisms underlying the transaction between cultural, educational, and social-emotional related to educational, and mental and physical health functioning.

CHDV 144.     Community Service Learning in Developmental and Educational Settings. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Designed to provide a range of service learning experiences where students apply their academic knowledge and skills in community-based settings. The community-based experiences will be combined with classroom activities designed to develop student understanding of topics related to their service activities such as tutoring reading and math, mentoring students from disadvantaged backgrounds, working with special populations of children.

Note: May be taken up to four times for credit (maximum 12 units of credit).

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 145.     Controversial Issues in Childhood Development, Education, and Social Policy. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D, Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Discussion-based examination of controversial issues linking development, education, and cultural practice in which scholarly inquiry has substantial implications for social policy. Specific topics vary by semester and include topics of both historical relevance and contemporary debates. Content relevant to multiple disciplines including issues such as adolescent risk behavior, bilingual education, brain-base pedagogy, child care, children and the law, cultural diversity, developmental theory and educational practice, gender, literacy practices, motivation, parenting styles, school violence, special education, standardized testing, and technological change.

CHDV 150A.     Early Literacy Development in First and Second Language. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 123 or CHDV 133. CHDV 123 or CHDV 133 may be taken concurrently.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 150B.

Term Typically Offered: Summer only

Students will become familiar with language and emergent litercy of young children from birth to eight. An overview of research-based developmental progression will be emphasized as it relates to the learning foundations for language and literacy. Other focal points will be home-school connections and cultural influences on literary development. Assessment topics, including observation and other developmental strategies will be intergrated. An emphasis on increasing students' ability to connect theoretical understanding to the practice offered in CHDV 150B.

CHDV 150B.     Early Literacy Development in First and Second Language Practicum. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 123 or CHDV 133. CHDV 123 or CHDV 133 may be taken concurrently.

Corequisite(s): CHDV 150B.

Term Typically Offered: Summer only

The practicum experience (20 hours) will provide students with the application of course content material learned in CHDV 150A. Students will observe and validate multiple experiences in which first and second language learners learn language and literacy succesfully. Factors affecting language and literacy development will be addressed.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 153.     Apprenticeship in Advanced Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Faculty mentors will meet with graduate and undergraduate apprentices individually or in small groups for guided discussions of assigned readings and/or research data analysis/collection endeavors. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Note: Readings will depend on the specific mentor's research or scholarly interest; May be repeated up to four times for 12 units of credit, with a limit of 6 units applied towards the CHDV major requirements.

CHDV 154.     Issues in Parenting. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or FACS 52.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Survey of historical and contemporary attitudes toward parenting. Review of research on child-rearing and parent-child relationships. Use of case studies to explore the influence of personality, developmental stage, family structure, ethnic and cultural factors on parenting. Lecture, Case Study.

Cross-listed: FACS 154; only one may be counted for credit.

CHDV 157.     Infant and Toddler: Development and Care. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: CHDV 30 or CHDV 35, FACS 50, PSYC 148, or SWRK 125A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Research theory and practice are examined in relation to each area of infant and toddler development (conception through 24 months): Physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and perceptual. Individual differences and needs are stressed. Issues pertinent to individual and group care will be covered. Activities include lecture, discussion, and observations.

Cross Listed: FACS 157; only one may be counted for credit.

CHDV 194.     Cooperative Education Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 60 units total credit and instructor permission. May be taken four times for a maximum of 12 units credit.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Cooperative Education (Co-op) relates academic theory to professional practice by providing paid work experience in the student's major field of study and academic credit. Students receive supervised employment in school districts, state and community agencies, companies and other appropriate settings. Requires regular meetings with faculty supervisor, completion of field study assignment, evaluation by field-based supervisor, and a written final report.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 196A.     Approaches to Research Methods in Child Development A. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or equivalent; completion of 45 total units; Must be taken prior to completion of 90 units.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course examines methodological issues involved in assessment, observation, analysis, and design in the field of child development. Topics include the research process. APA style writing, ethics, design and methods, use assessment tools, qualitative and quantitative data analysis and interpretation. The focus will be on becoming critical consumers of research and developing the skills of scientific injury.

Note: First course in a series. 196B must be taken in the semester immediately following completion of CHDV 196A.

CHDV 196B.     Approaches to Research Methods in Child Development B. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 196A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Two semester sequence of instruction that examines methodological issues involved in assessment, observation, research design, and analytical concepts involved in the field of child and adolescent development. Topics include the research process, APA style writing, ethics, design and methods, use assessment tools, qualitative and quantitative data analysis and interpretation. The focus will be on becoming critical consumers of research and developing the skills for scientific inquiry.

Note: Must be taken prior to 90 units.

CHDV 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individual projects designed especially for students capable of independent study. Admission by written approval of the instructor and Department Chair.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 210.     Seminar in Social Development. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Advanced seminar focusing on theoretical and empirical readings covering topics in social/emotional development. Potential topics may include social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence with consideration of biological and environmental influences.

CHDV 211.     Seminar in Cognitive Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to MA program or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Advanced developmental seminar focusing on theoretical and empirical readings covering topics in cognitive development. Specific topics will be related to cognitive development of children from conception through adolescence with consideration of biological and environmental influences.

CHDV 242.     Theoretical Approaches to Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

An in-depth examination of physical, cognitive, and social development from infancy through adolescence. Content includes current developmental theory and research and the application of this research to educational and community settings, with special emphasis on the cultural context of development. The development of critical thinking skills and scholarly writing will be emphasized.

Note: Graduate Writing Intensive course

CHDV 244.     Community Service Learning in Developmental and Educational Settings. 1 - 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Designed to provide a range of service learning experiences where students apply their academic knowledge and skills in community-based settings. The community-based experiences will be combined with classroom activities designed to develop student understanding of topics related to their service activities such as tutoring reading and math, mentoring students from disadvantaged backgrounds, working with special populations of children.

Note: May be taken up to four times for credit (maximum 12 units of credit).

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 245.     Selected Topics in Developmental Theory. 3 - 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to MA program or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

In-depth study of selected topics in cognitive and socio-emotional development of preschool and primary grade children as related to educational practice. Content includes theory and research on psychological dimensions of children as they participate in various contextual settings.

Note: May be repeated twice as long as topic differs. Three units may be used toward the elective requirements in the Master of Arts in Child Development.

CHDV 246.     Motivation and Learning in Children. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Sources of and developmental changes in motivation, including biological predispositions, critical life events, individual differences, and social, cultural and educational experiences will be examined. Students will participate in a group research effort on motivation and educational practice.

CHDV 247.     Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross-cultural Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 242; graduate standing or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

The cultural basis of human development through an in-depth examination of the socio-emotional, cognitive, language and gender development of children from infancy through adolescence within and across different cultures and communities. Theory, methods, and research of cross-cultural investigations will be considered and applications of course material to educational and community settings will be explored and analyzed.

CHDV 248.     Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Advanced study of the sociocultural influences on curriculum development. Research, theory, and curricular practices will be analyzed, evaluated and applied to a variety of preschool and primary grade settings.

CHDV 249.     Language Processes in Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to MA program or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Language is an important cognitive and communicative tool that promotes learning. Through an integrative approach to language and cognitive development, students will examine how children learn through language. Students will have practical experience in collecting and analyzing children's language learning in educational settings.

CHDV 250.     Research Methods. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 133; admission to the MA program or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Survey of both qualitative and quantitative methods in the development of reliable knowledge in the field of education. Includes identification and formulation of research problems, research designs and presentation of reports representative of different research strategies. Critical thinking and writing skills will be emphasized.

CHDV 253.     Apprenticeship in Advanced Child Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Faculty mentors will meet with graduate and undergraduate apprentices individually or in small groups for guided discussions of assigned readings and/or research data analysis/collection endeavors.

Note: Readings will depend on the specific mentor's research or scholarly interest; May be repeated up to 4 times for credit.

CHDV 290.     Seminar for Culminating Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy; completion of at least 20 units of course work towards the MA, instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Seminar to focus on topics/elements/expectations to be included in the culminating experience: defining and narrowing a topic for study; abstract writing; differentiation of primary/secondary source of evidence; development of organizational schemes for a literature review; database literature searches; APA format requirements; time management, range and breadth of evidence for a comprehensive review; connecting the review and project/thesis; writing style and quality; revisions and critical feedback; social/psychological dimensions of thesis/project process; data analysis and statistics help on campus for thesis.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 292.     Culminating Seminar for Exam Option. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of all foundation course requirements for MA program (CHDV 200A, CHDV 200B, CHDV 242, CHDV 247, CHDV 250) advancement to candidacy, or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Seminar to focus on topics/elements/expectations for the exam option culminating experience: test preparation and tips, exam writing, practice exam questions, time management, and community building with other students. Students will complete reading and writing assignments related to each exam area and prepare for an exam question related to an approved elective topic of their choice. Students will submit an exam petition to be reviewed and approved by the departmental exam committee.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 295.     Practicum in Child Development. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Directed field based experience in preschool, elementary or other community based settings serving children from infancy through adolescence and their families. Designed to provide students the opportunity to develop professional skills and understandings in applied settings or explore career development opportunities with particular emphasis on leadership or administrative skills and knowledge.

Note: Students are required to work at an instructor-approved field site consistent with their career goals and interests and attend an on campus seminar.

CHDV 299.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Open only to upper division and graduate students with consent of faculty advisor and Department Chair.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individual projects at graduate level designed especially for students capable of independent study. Departmental petition, signed by instructor with whom student will be working and department chair, required.

Credit/No Credit

CHDV 504.     Culminating Experience in Child Development: Thesis or Project. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to MA, Child Development program or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Guidance toward completion of thesis or project option for the MA, Child Development program. Credit is given upon successful completion of a thesis, project, or other approved culminating experience. Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the Master's degree and has secured the permission of his/her faculty advisor and the Department Chair one full semester prior to registration.

CHDV 505.     Culminating Experience in Child Development: Exam Option. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to and completion of all course requirements for the MA, Child Development program, CHDV 292 or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Guidance in ongoing preparation for the examination option for the MA, Child Development program. Credit is given upon successful completion of the examination option for the culminating experience. Open only to the graduate student who has completed all other course requirements, has been advanced to candidacy for the Master's degree, and has secured the permission of the Department Chair one full semester prior to registration.

Credit/No Credit

DEAF 51.     American Sign Language 1. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Students will learn basic vocabulary and grammar of American Sign Language. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to exchange basic information about themselves and their families such as their names, where they live, and their interests. Through out-of-class readings, in-class discussions and demonstrations, and experiences within the deaf community, students are exposed to elements of the deaf culture and community.

Note: Taught in ASL without voice.

DEAF 52.     American Sign Language 2. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 51 or equivalent.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Foreign Language Graduation Requirement

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Students will continue to expand vocabulary and concepts acquired in DEAF 51. Expansion of conversational range includes talking about other people and activities, giving directions, and making requests. Students develop discourse skills appropriate for establishing connections with deaf acquaintances and handling a variety of interruptions. Through in-class discussions/demonstrations, course readings, and out-of-class field experience, students are exposed to elements of the deaf culture and community.

Note: Taught in ASL without voice.

DEAF 53.     American Sign Language 3. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDS 52 or equivalent.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Foreign Language Graduation Requirement

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Students will expand communicative repertoire developed in DEAF 52 to talk about people and places in a contextually-reduced framework. Students learn to describe places, objects, and events. Students develop basic narrative skills to tell about past events. Through in-class discussions/demonstrations, course readings, and out-of-class field experience, students are exposed to elements of the deaf community and culture.

Note: Taught in ASL without voice.

DEAF 56.     ASL Fingerspelling and Numbers. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 52

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Students will develop increased fluency in their expressive and receptive abilities in fingerspelling through in-class practice and viewing of videotaped narratives. Students will also reinforce their abilities to utilize ASL numbering systems for time, money, measurements, and game scores, amount others.

DEAF 57.     ASL Classifiers. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 53; may be taken concurrently

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Students will develop increased understanding of the types and uses of classifiers in ASL and develop further abilities to utilize this component of ASL in their expressive and receptive signing abilities through in-class practice, viewing of videotaped narratives, and individual practice outside of class.

DEAF 60.     Introduction to Deaf Studies. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Course introduces students to topics central to the deaf and deaf community, including audiology, education, culture, and history. Utilizing readings, lectures and group discussion, students will learn about the anatomy and causes of deafness, early intervention and education of deaf children, communication strategies and their effectiveness, the deaf as a cultural group and deaf/hearing relationships. Upon course completion, students will understand deaf individuals and their community in a holistic perspective and apply this knowledge toward further studies into the deaf culture and community.

DEAF 154.     American Sign Language 4. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 53

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Principles, methods and techniques of manual communication with deaf people using American Sign Language. Emphasis on the continuation of developing advanced manual communication skills with a focus on techniques for informing others of factual information and instruction about rules and methods for students who will work or interact with adult deaf persons. Continuation of the analysis of the culture of deafness with emphasis on participation in the community.

Note: Taught in ASL without voice.

DEAF 155.     American Sign Language 5. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 154 or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Students will build upon communicative skills developed in EDS 154 to develop and expand on their abilities to discuss parts of the body and health conditions, tell a personal narrative about themselves and moments in theirs and others' lives, as well as to retell and translate simple stories into ASL.

DEAF 161.     Deaf History. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 60; may be taken concurrently

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

An overview of the education of the deaf from prehistoric times to the present will be provided. Roots of current trends and events in deaf education will be explored, with projections for the future. Current issues such as mainstreaming, cochlear implants, communication modalities for instruction and others are discussed in both a historical context and from a deaf perspective.

DEAF 162.     Deaf Culture and Community. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 60; may be taken concurrently.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Course introduces students to deaf people as a cultural and linguistic minority in America through coverage of sociolinguistic, anthropological, and historic issues in the development of deaf culture and community in America and worldwide. Utilizing readings, lectures and group discussion, topics will include: theories of culture; language use; cross-cultural interaction and intercultural processes, and deaf literature and art. Upon course completion, students will understand current and past educational, legal and medical policies and their impact on deaf and hard-of-hearing people.

DEAF 163.     ASL Literature. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 57, DEAF 60, DEAF 154, DEAF 161, DEAF 162, and DEAF 164.

Term Typically Offered: Spring only

Students will be exposed to a number of ASL stories on videotape, learn several different forms of ASL literature and develop their own stories and narratives in each format. They will understand the effects of genre, style, perspective, and other artistic techniques on ASL storytelling, and utilize similar techniques in their developed stories. Students may perform their stories for a general audience.

DEAF 164.     Sign Language Structure and Usage. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 154 or instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Examines origins and linguistic structure of American Sign Language (ASL). Cross-linguistic comparisons with spoken and signed languages of other countries will be made. Students will learn aspects of ASL phonology, morphology and syntax. Sociolinguistic aspects of ASL usage in regard to gender, ethnicity, geographical region and educational status will be discussed. Conducted entirely in American Sign Language.

DEAF 165.     Seminar: Current Issues in the Deaf -World. 2 - 5 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 60, DEAF 154, DEAF 161, and DEAF 162.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course will explore a specific theme of interest to faculty and students within the program, with course content changed each semester. Selected topics will touch upon issues of special concern and interest to the Deaf community such as genetics, multicultural issues, media representations of deafness, theatre and performance art, visual arts, and other subjects which may arise in the fiuture. Course will consist of readings, discussion, independent research, and viewing of various media as appropriate.

Note: May be repeated when diffrent topic is offered.

DEAF 166.     Experiences in the Deaf Community. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): DEAF 155, DEAF 161, DEAF 162, and DEAF 164.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

This course links active participation in the Deaf community to the content of previous Deaf Studies courses. In particular this course examines how to be a good ally within the Deaf community in the midst of a context of power, privilege and difference. Following a Service Learning model, student teams will collaborate on various service projects contributing to the Deaf community. In addition, some students may be assigned volunteer placements serving the Deaf community.

DEAF 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individual projects designed especially for students capable of independent study.

Note: Departmental petition required.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 10.     Critical Thinking and the Educated Person. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Critical Thinking (A3)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examines thinking process patterns and dispositions, for self, children, parents and educators. Familiarizes students with critical thinking, provides a systematic approach to its process and components. Students will learn about problem solving, decision-making, logical and creative thinking. The study of critical thinking will be supplemented with readings, discussions, and written assignments. Implements critical thinking applications used both in student's academic and personal lives.

EDUC 10H.     Critical Thinking and the Educated Person: Honors. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Open only to Honors students.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Critical Thinking (A3)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This introductory course will examine the thinking process patterns and dispositions for self, children, parents and educators. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with critical thinking, and to provide a systematic approach to its process and components. Students will learn about problem solving, decision-making, logical and creative thinking. The study of critical thinking will be supplemented with readings, discussions, and written assignments. The course will implement critical thinking applications used both in student's academic and personal lives.

EDUC 18.     Mathematical Practices Across Cultures. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Math Concepts & Quantitative Reasoning (B4)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to diverse mathematical thought, action and practices across cultures. Mathematics will be seen from a diversity of contexts. Learners will consider how diverse contexts and traditions both reflect a culture's heritage and world view and influence the mathematics learned and used. Topics covered include: ethnomathematics, mathematical modeling, and cultural connections in relation to diverse forms of quantitative reasoning, problem solving, numbering, systems of organization, perceptions of time and space as experienced by diverse traditions and peoples.

EDUC 21.     First Year Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Understanding Personal Development (E)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to the nature and possible meanings of higher education, and the functions and resources of the University. Designed to help students develop and exercise fundamental academic success strategies and to improve their basic learning skills. Students will have the opportunity to interact with fellow classmates and the seminar leader to build a community of academic support and personal support.

EDUC 99.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individual projects designed especially for lower division students capable of independent study. Focus is on issues and topics involving exceptional populations.

Note: may be repeated for up to 12 units of credit

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 100A.     Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): EDUC 100B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course provides an overview of current knowledge about individuals with disabilities within the context of inclusive educational and community-based settings, with substantial focus on the role of the educator in the education of students who have disabilities in diverse communities. Content includes historical factors, legislation, causes and characteristics, educational needs, educational strategies, including educational technologies, assessment, collaboration, and support services for individuals with disabilities ranging across mild, moderate, severe, and profound disability levels.

Note: Designed to meet the Special Education requirement for a clear multiple and single subject credential.

EDUC 100B.     Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings Lab. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): EDUC 100A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Field-based 30 hour experience. Lab is a synthesis and application of EDUC 100A course content in educational setting for students who receive special education services. Students will verify multiple experiences across the age-span and in inclusive educational settings, agencies, and community environments.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 101A.     Consultation Strategies for Educators of Students with Disabilities. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): EDUC 101B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Basic skills for effective collaboration and teaming are practiced through simulations, reflective case study analyses, and interviews with families, paraprofessionals, and related service providers. Cultural, socioeconomic and organizational implications are analyzed.

EDUC 101B.     Consultation Strategies for Educators of Students with Disabilities - Lab. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): EDUC 101A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Field-based practice lab (30 hours). Lab will be a synthesis and application of course content (EDUC 101A) in the development of basic collaboration strategies for individuals with mild/moderate disabilities. Students are required to participate in class visitations, interviews, and other field assignments.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 102.     Characteristics and Management of Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Demonstrates how to design motivating instruction that builds self esteem, maintains on-task behavior, and promotes learning among students at different developmental levels and of varying abilities. Examines stages of development of the career technical education learner and methods of maintaining student discipline using strategies that are free of bias and promote learning among diverse students.

EDUC 103.     Assessment and Instruction in Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 102.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Demonstrates how to develop performance criteria, continuously assess student performance levels, prepare lesson plans and units of instruction for use with individual, small group, and whole class delivery systems, keep accurate records of student achievement, and perform program evaluations.

EDUC 104.     Teaching Diverse Learners in Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Demonstrates how to encourage excellence among and design instruction for students from different gender, ethnic, religious, sexual orientation, language, and ability groups. Includes consideration of relevant law, sensitivity towards cultural heritages, principles of language acquisition, bias free instructional materials, and inclusionary programs. Examines the work of major education theorists and the research on effective teaching practices. Demonstrates the use of technology and computers in instruction.

EDUC 105.     Advanced Instructional Design, Program Evaluation and Leadership in Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

Demonstrates how to recruit, place and guide students, organize a program advisory committee, plan and manage a program budget, implement a plan for preventive maintenance, manage customer service, and reflect current professional association best practices. Examines local state, and federal structure of technical education. Demonstrates how to plan and prepare a complete course of instruction, including goals, lesson plans, materials, strategies, and assessment procedures, teaching critical thinking and problem solving skills. Develops and uses student and employer follow-up studies as a part of an evaluation plan that leads to program improvement.

EDUC 106.     Instructional Supervision/Coordination I of Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Students must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Offers student participation in performance-based objectives program addressing the following major topics: Principles of supervision, supervision models, consultation and coordination skills, facilitation skills, curriculum management, and labor relations.

EDUC 107.     Instructional Supervision/Coordination II of Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Offers student participation in a performance-based objectives program addressing the following major topics: School finance, grants and proposals, teacher observation models, staff development models, and total quality management practices.

EDUC 109.     Career Guidance in Career Technical Education. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Application for Review of Work Experience)

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

Examines the occupational history of students and assists them in gathering documentation to support their request to the CSU Reviewing Committee. Assists students in identifying goals for professional accomplishment.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 110.     Current Issues in Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Provides in-depth investigation of various problems and issues confronting the career technical educator in public and private sectors. The class will focus on the specific issues of adult career development and perspectives of work. These issues will be explored from both global and personal perspectives. Students will gain awareness and understanding in relation to their own individual career development, as well as the career development of those with whom they work or will work.

EDUC 111.     Education for Career Technical Students with Special Needs. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduces concepts and practices of inclusion of special needs students as provided for under federal legislation and case law. Methods of adapting instruction and devising positive behavioral supports for students of diverse abilities are studied. Methods of assessing the progress of students with diverse abilities are examined.

EDUC 112.     Legislation and Financing of Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Offers a historical review of legislation and financing of career technical education programs at the federal, state, and local levels, addressing community colleges, regional occupational programs, secondary schools, corrections, private post-secondary schools, private industry education and training.

EDUC 113.     Introduction to Technology Based Teaching Strategies in Career Technical Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

Examines the use of computers and their application in career technical instruction. Applications involving direct instruction, discovery learning, problem solving, assessment, practice and presentation are learned. Other technologies that support teaching and learning are studied and practiced. Issues involved in access to and use and control of computer based technologies in a democratic society are studied.

EDUC 114.     Multicultural Career Technical Education for a Pluralistic Society. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examines cultural diversity and the historical and cultural traditions of the major cultural, ethnic, and linguistic groups in California. Methods of effective ways to include cultural traditions and community values in the instructional program are learned. Principles of second language acquisition, language teaching strategies, and curriculum adaptions for students whose second language is English are studied.

EDUC 115.     Behavior Management and Total Quality Management in Career Technical Education Program. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

Teaches students how to manage the classroom and learning behavior of career technical education students in various settings under various circumstances. Total Quality Management procedures for career technical education/training programs are studied.

EDUC 116.     Special Problems in Career Technical Education. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student: must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individualized study of various questions and problems within career/technical education determined collaboratively by the student and the instructor.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 117.     Field Experience in Career Technical Education. 1 - 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Student must be admitted to the BSCTS program

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individualized field experience designed collaboratively by the student and instructor.

Note: Department consent required

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 120.     Literature For Children. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Must have Junior or higher standing to enroll in this course

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Historical and modern children's literature; standards of selection and acquaintance with the leading authors and illustrators; procedures and practices in methodology.

EDUC 121.     Multicultural Children's Literature. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Survey of historical and modern multicultural children's literature examining standards of selection and acquaintance with the leading authors, illustrators and book awards; procedures and practice in methodology. Focus on children's literature which represents the diversity in America and fosters an understanding of the cultural values, identity, and heritage of those populations.

EDUC 124A.     Tutoring Children in Mathematics. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): EDUC 124B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Orientation to concept and practice of tutoring basic mathematics skills including developing conceptual understanding and the ability to scaffold instruction of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. After completing on-campus training, students are placed in nearby school districts. May be taken by all undergraduate students and is strongly recommended for students considering careers in education, criminal justice, psychology, and social work. It may also be used as an elective in the Blended Teacher Education Program.

Note: May be taken twice for credit.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 124B.     Tutoring Children in Mathematics: Practicum. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): EDUC 124A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Practicum of tutoring basic mathematics skills and scaffolding instruction of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. After completing on-campus training, students are placed in nearby school districts. May be taken by all undergraduate students and is strongly recommended for students considering careers in education, criminal justice, psychology, and social work. It may also be used as an elective in the Blended Teacher Education Program.

Note: May be taken twice for credit.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 125A.     Tutoring Children in Reading. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): EDUC 125B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Orientation to concept and practice of tutoring basic reading skills including sight word recognition, word analysis skills, oral fluency, and comprehension. After completing on-campus training, students are placed in nearby school districts.

Note: Strongly recommended for students considering careers in education, criminal justice, psychology and social work. May be repeated once for credit. May also be used as an elective in the Blended Teacher Education Program.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 125B.     Tutoring Children in Reading Practicum. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): EDUC 125A

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Field-based course provides a synthesis and application of course content learned in EDUC 125B. Students are placed in a primary level setting for at-risk students who read approximately two grade levels below their peers. The twice-weekly practicum focuses on comprehension questioning strategies, learning styles and differences, multicultural and ESL strategies, Reader's theater and poetry, and motivating students to achieve greater academic success.

Note: May be taken by all undergraduate students and must be taken concurrently with EDUC 125A.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 126.     Assisting the Elementary Classroom Teacher. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 125A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Directly connected to hands-on classroom experiences. Students will be intensively trained in workshops, and will work as teacher assistants in public schools (4 hours per week). Students will learn strategies for working with diverse groups of students at all grade levels; keep weekly tutoring logs; and write a case study on a student and present their findings to the class. Students will reflect on their own growth and development.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 127A.     Field Experience in After School STEM Programs. 2 Units

Corequisite(s): EDUC 127B

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Orientation to high quality Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) instruction. On-campus training includes skills to develop conceptual understanding and ability to scaffold instruction for elementary and middle school aged students in STEM after school programs. After completing on-campus training, students assist with instruction in nearby school STEM programs.

Note: May be taken twice for credit

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 127B.     Field Experience in After School STEM Programs: Practicum. 1 Unit

Corequisite(s): EDUC 127A

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course is designed to connect students with local public school partners in after school programs that support inquiry based STEM activities with K-8 children. After completing on-campus training, students then complete the practicum.

Note: May be taken twice for credit

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 128.     Education and Communication in Korean Society. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course is designed to explore various dimensions of the education and the communication in Korea. It will focus on (a) the Korean educational philosophy, system, and practices of all levels -preschool to higher education; (b) the Korean language in a variety of communicative contexts; and (c) how education and communication shape and interface. The similarities and differences in education and communication between South Korea and the United States will be also investigated.

EDUC 130A.     Typical & Atypical Developmental Characteristics and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or approved equivalent.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 130B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of disabilities and risk factors and their influence on developmental competencies and outcomes for infants, toddlers, and young children. Content will include typical developmental patterns of young children, atypical development due to prenatal, perinatal and early childhood developmental risk factors including low incidence disabilities, and an introduction to interventions in a range of community settings to address the unique needs of these children and their families. Lecture.

EDUC 130B.     Typical & Atypical Development Characteristics and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities Lab. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30 or approved equivalent.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 130A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Field-based practice lab (30 hours). Lab will be a synthesis and application of lecture/discussion course content in home based, center based, and community settings serving infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities and their families.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 131A.     Introduction to Family Centered Service Delivery In Early Childhood Special Education. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 130A and EDUC 130B or its equivalent.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 131B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Designed to enable participants to gain knowledge and develop skills necessary to provide culturally responsive, family-centered approaches to assessment and intervention for infants and young children with disabilities. Focus will be on the historical, theoretical, and philosophical bases for family-centered service delivery, including an emphasis on understanding family systems and family life stages, respect for cultural diversity, the IFSP process, collaborative parent-professional relationships, parent advocacy, and transition planning. Lecture.

EDUC 131B.     Introduction to Family Centered Service Delivery in Early Childhood Special Education Laboratory. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 130A and EDUC 130B or its equivalent.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 131A.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Field-based practice lab (30 hours). Lab will be a synthesis and application of lecture course content (EDUC 131A) in home-based , center-based and/or community settings serving infants and young children with disabilities and their families.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 155.     Introduction to Counseling. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to the profession of counseling, including differences between professional counseling and other professions, counseling theories, consultation skills and an introduction to basic counseling skills. Lecture three hours.

Note: Open to unclassified students on a space available basis. Required prerequisite for the Master of Science in Counseling and requirement for the Counseling minor, not included in 200-series 60 unit program for master's degree. Instructor approval required.

EDUC 156.     Power, Privilege and Self Identity in Counseling. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Focuses on understanding how one's values, attitudes, belief systems impact perception of differences related to race, ethnicity, culture, etc. Experiential activities promote self awareness while developing capacity in becoming a culturally responsive/skilled counselor. Historical processes that created inter and intra group constructs are explored.

Note: Open to unclassified students on a space available basis. Required corequisite for the Master of Science in Counseling and requirement for the Counseling Minor, not included in 200-series 60 unit master's degree. Instructor approval required.

EDUC 157.     Child and Family Psychopathology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Students minoring in couseling must take CHDV 30 or CHDV 35 or PSYC 2.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examines the etiology of development and mental health issues in children, youth and caregivers, including genetic and socio-cultural factors. The classification and treatment of abnormal behavior within family contexts will also be explored. Recommended for human services majors such as child development, education, psychology, counseling, social work and criminal justice.

EDUC 160.     Urban Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), GE AREA D, Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Designed to enhance students' knowledge of urban schooling, especially related to dynamics of race, class, and culture. Along with a Service Learning component in urban schools, provides analysis of the following: historical, socioeconomic, and political factors influencing urban education; the distribution of opportunity in cities and their schools; and effective instructional organizational practices that close the achievement gap, including the development of positive school cultures and the use of community services and resources.

EDUC 165.     Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D, Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course is designed to introduce students to the educational programs and practices resulting from societal sex role and racial stereotyping. It analyzes the specific effects of sex and race inequalities in the total school setting.

EDUC 168.     Foundational Issues for a Multicultural, Pluralistic Society, B. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission and enrollment in BMED multiple subject credential program; EDBM 117.

Corequisite(s): EDBM 402B.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Critical examination of the socio-political relationship between California's public schools and its major population subgroups (as defined by culture, gender, social class, language, race/ethnicity, and ability). Candidates critically reflect on the philosophy and practices of schooling in relation to students' culture, family and community; analyze institutional and instructional practices for educational equity; and develop alternative instructional activities based on the principles of multicultural education and English language learning in a democratic society. Lectures, discussions, small group work, simulations, field tasks.

EDUC 170.     Bilingual Education: Introduction to Educating English Learners. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introductory study of important themes regarding the education of English Learners. Covers the history of bilingual education; relevant legal mandates and court rulings; first and second language acquisition; linguistic development; theory and practice of effective programs; and beginning methods, materials and strategies responsive to the students' primary language and assessed levels of English proficiency. A fieldwork component involving the tutoring of an English Learner is required.

Note: EDUC 170 is a prerequisite for EDMS 272, EDBM 279.

EDUC 171.     Bilingualism in the Classroom. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Provides an overview of the language factors that impact first and second language acquisitions in the K-12 classrooms and will provide opportunities through which they will build a palette of strategies that can be utilized to enhance language development within the realms of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking. A combination of theory and practice will provide the base as students read, discuss, listen to lectures, view videos, conduct in class and field-based tasks, and synthesize their thoughts in writing.

EDUC 172.     Introduction to Hmong Literacy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fluent in Hmong

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course covers fundamental literacy components of the Hmong language. It examines the historical development and maintenance of the Hmong oral and written language and related issues based on lectures, class discussions, group work, writing assignments, and a research paper. It fulfills one of the requirements for teaching credential students pursuing the Bilingual Cross Cultural Authorization (BCLAD).

EDUC 173.     Hmong History and Culture. 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course covers history of the Hmong dated 5,000 years ago to the present. It examines Hmong history and culture as it evolves through living in various Asian countries and in the United States through lectures, class discussions, group work, writing assignments, and a research paper.

EDUC 175.     Pedagogy and Academic Language Skills in Spanish for Bilingual Educators. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Spanish fluency/literacy required.

Term Typically Offered: Fall only

This course is designed to provide participants background and foundational knowledge in Standard Spanish language use, language varieties in Spanish, issues of power and language in our society, academic language use, and bilingual methods. Participants will examine theoretical and practical issues in bilingual language use in society and in the classroom. Participants will learn and apply bilingual teaching methods, will analyze children's bilingual language use, and also will evaluate Spanish medium texts and trade books.

EDUC 194.     Cooperative Education Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Approval of Department Chair.

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Cooperative Education (Co-op) relates academic theory to professional practice by providing paid work experience in the student's major field of study and academic credit. Students receive employment in school districts, state and community agencies, companies, and other appropriate settings. Requires attendance at weekly meetings, preparation of application packet, completion of field study assignment and a written final report.

Note: Units may not be used to meet course work requirements.

Credit/No Credit

EDUC 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Individual projects designed especially for students capable of independent study. Admission by written approval of the instructor with whom the student will be working and Department Chair.

Credit/No Credit