Anthropology

College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies

Program Description

Anthropology is the study of humans, past and present.  Anthropologists take a broad approach to understanding the varieties of human experience, which uniquely places us at the juxtaposition of the social sciences, natural sciences and the humanities. Anthropology is traditionally organized into four subfields that offer distinctive skills. 

Cultural and Social Anthropology deals with the social lives of people around the world, including our own society: economic systems, legal practices, kinship, religions, medical practices, folklore, arts and political systems, as well as the interrelationship of these systems in environmental adaptation and social change. Anthropological Linguistics deals with varied aspects of human language and the characteristics of nonhuman communication systems, to achieve an understanding of past and present human language systems and their significance in social life.

Biological Anthropology is a biological science that deals with adaptations, variability and evolution of humans, and our living and fossil relatives. It is also a social science because biological anthropologists study human biology within the context of culture and behavior. Simply put, they study humans from a biocultural perspective across space and time. Physical Anthropology describes and compares world human biology. Focuses on humans and their primate order, and seeks to document and understand the interplay of culture and biology in the course of human evolution and adaptation.

Archaeology focuses on the material remains of human societies from the remote and recent past with emphasis on reconstructing and understanding past modes of human cultural adaptation and change.

While maintaining exposure to these four subfields, the Anthropology program allows students to sharpen their skills in specific domains of anthropological thought and practice. Students may choose from three concentrations that share a common foundation.

  • Archaeology and Biological Anthropology (ABA): emphasizes a scientific approach to anthropology.  Studying diverse topics including; evolutionary processes, human variation, ecology, skeletal analysis and zoo-archaeology, it prepares students for careers in the anthropological sciences in both the public and private sectors, such as cultural resources management, forensic science; collections management, and advanced graduate studies in anthropological sciences or related disciplines.
  • Culture, Language and Society (CLS): introduces students to knowledge and skills necessary for a nuanced understanding and engagement with the world we live in.  It prepares students for graduate studies in socio-cultural and linguistic anthropology, professional careers in government, business, law, healthcare and any contexts that require attention to cultural, social and linguistic dynamics
  • General Anthropology (GA): constitutes a solid liberal arts foundation that prepares students for careers and graduate studies in fields that call for a broad exposure to anthropological knowledge.  Students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, can also choose to customize a program of study to pursue individualized academic or professional interests.

Special Features

  • Diverse faculty who are widely published and enjoy national repute in their specializations.
  • Regular activities include Faculty Colloquia, the Sacramento Anthropological Society sponsored brown bag discussions and annual symposium.
  • Extensive ethnographic and archaeological collections, housed in the Museum of Anthropology and the Archaeological Curation Facility, afford students opportunities to learn all phases of museum and collections management work. The Department exhibit hall displays an excellent collection of museum artifacts.
  • The Department maintains a computer lab, as well as several computer stations in the Archaeology lab.
  • Course related fieldwork in California and the Great Basin and archaeological laboratory opportunities are offered through internships at the Archaeological Research Center (ARC) and the Archaeological Curation Facility (ACF). Paid fieldwork and laboratory opportunities may also be available for qualified students through the ARC and ACF.
  • Professional journals and the updated Human Relations Area File are housed in the University Library.

Career Possibilities

Anthropology equips students with the necessary knowledge to engage with the political, economic, cultural, and social complexities of the world. In addition to providing students analytical and critical thinking skills, anthropology exposes students to the intersection of culture, biology, and history on peoples’ lived experiences. Majoring in Anthropology provides students a solid foundation for advanced studies in diverse fields such as anthropology, business, cultural resources management, law, journalism, medicine, communication, social work, urban studies, public policy, informatics, and any other profession that calls for the sustained engagement with cultural diversity, critical thinking, analytical abilities and people skills. Given the training they receive, anthropologists are increasing sought by the business world, government agencies and non-government organizations. Traditionally Anthropology majors have pursued careers in primary and secondary teaching; consumer market research; human resource development; local, state, and federal governmental agencies; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); archaeological field or laboratory technicians; forensic analysis, community development organizations; trade union organizations and allied fields. The globalized world economy has expanded this horizon to include career opportunities in communication, health care, entertainment, information technology, consumer product development, etc.

Contact Information

Raghuraman Trichur, Department Chair
Ana Gutierrez, Administrative Support Coordinator
Mendocino Hall 4010
(916) 278-6452
www.csus.edu/anth

Faculty

BARATA, DATA

BISHOP, JOYCE

BISKOWSKI, MARTIN

CASTANEDA, TERRI

DELACORTE, MICHAEL G.

FISHER, JACOB

HENS, SAMANTHA

MURPHY, LIAM

STEVENS, NATHAN E.

STRASSER, M. ELIZABETH

SULLIVAN, ROGER

TRICHUR, RAGHURAMAN

WALKER, MICHAEL M.

ZEANAH, DAVID W.

 

BA in Anthropology

Units required: 52 units, includes units of study in chosen concentration
Minimum total units required for BA: 120

Required Lower Division Core Courses (13 Units)
ANTH 1Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
ANTH 1ABiological Anthropology Laboratory1
ANTH 2Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 3Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 4Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking3
Upper Division Core Requirements (12 Units)
ANTH 146Ethnographic Analysis3
ANTH 162Language and Culture3
Select one of the following:3
California Archaeology
Great Basin Archaeology
Prehistory of the Southwest
North American Prehistory
The Evolution of Early Mesoamerican States
Select one of the following:3
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Human Variation
Additional requirements for Concentrations (27 Units)
Select one of the following:27
Archaeology & Biological Anthropology Concentrations
Culture, Language & Society Concentration
General Anthropology Concentration
Total Units52

Concentration - Archaeology & Biological Anthropology 

Required units: 27

The Archaeological and Biological Anthropology concentration provides students with the knowledge, skills and perspectives of scientific anthropology. It prepares students for careers in the anthropological sciences, such as cultural resources management, skeletal identification, zoological or museum technicians for the graduate training.

Required Upper Division Courses (18 Units)
Archaeology Theory
Select one of the following:3
Anthropology of Hunters and Gatherers
Ecological and Evolutionary Approaches to Anthropology
Archaeological Method and Theory
Origins of Agriculture
Biological Anthropology
Select one of the following:3
Human Paleontology
Evolutionary Medicine
Primate Behavior
Evolution of Human Behavior
Laboratory Methods
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Statistics for Anthropologists
Environmental Archaeology
Techniques of Archaeological Analysis
Human Osteology
Laboratory Work in Archaeology
Fieldwork in Archaeology
Breadth Requirement
Select three from all the upper division courses listed above plus the following:9
Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology
Ancient Technology
Cultural Resource Management in Theory and Practice
Indians of California
Indians of North America
Primate Adaptations
Human Skeletal Analysis
Bioarchaeology: Analyzing Human Remains from Archaeology Sites
General Electives (6 Units)
Select any two upper division courses from Anthropology or any related discipline with approval from Major Advisor. 16
Additional Requirements (3 Units)
Anthropology majors select one statistics course 23
Total Units27
1

except ANTH 155 and ANTH 157

2

e.g. STAT 1, or one approved by the Department

Note: All requirements except General Electives must be completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

Concentration - Culture, Language & Society 

Required units: 27

The Culture, Language & Society concentration develops knowledge, skills and perspectives to understand and engage with our diverse, interconnected world. It is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to pursue graduate work or post-baccalaureate careers in government, the non-profit sector, education, healthcare or other contexts that require attention to cultural and linguistic dynamics.

Required Upper Division Courses (12 Units)
Theoretical Perspective
Select one of the following:3
Anthropology of War
Economic Anthropology
Social Anthropology
Culture Theory
Political Anthropology
Linguistic Anthropology
Religion and Culture
Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
Museums, Culture, and Society
Advanced Topics in Linguistic Anthropology
Methods
Select one of the following:3
Applied Anthropology
Research Methods in Linguistic Anthropology
Museum Methods
Laboratory in Ethnographic Techniques
Fieldwork in Ethnology
Breadth Requirement
Select two of the following:6
Europe in the Ethnographic Imagination
Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
African Cultures and Societies
Urban Anthropology
Culture Change
Anthropologies of Music
Anthropology of Contemporary Asia
Anthropology of Food
Anthropology of Globalization
Anthropology of Human Rights
Practicum (3 Units)
ANTH 191Anthropology Practicum3
General Electives (9 Units)
Select three upper division courses from Anthropology or related discipline with approval of Major Advisor. 19
Additional Requirements (3 Units)
Anthropology majors select one statistics course 23
Total Units27
1

except ANTH 155 and ANTH 157

2

e.g. STAT 1, or one approved by the Department

Note: All requirements except General Electives must be completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

Concentration - General Anthropology 

Required units: 27

The General Anthropology concentration introduces students to the fundamentals of archaeological, biological, sociocultural and linguistic anthropology. It constitutes a good liberal arts foundation that will help students pursue advanced studies and/or careers in diverse fields.

Required Upper Division Courses (12 Units)
Select two of the following:6
Anthropology of Hunters and Gatherers
Ecological and Evolutionary Approaches to Anthropology
Archaeological Method and Theory
California Archaeology
Great Basin Archaeology
Prehistory of the Southwest
North American Prehistory
Origins of Agriculture
The Evolution of Early Mesoamerican States
Indians of California
Indians of North America
Human Paleontology
Evolutionary Medicine
Primate Behavior
Evolution of Human Behavior
Select two of the following:6
Anthropology of War
Economic Anthropology
Europe in the Ethnographic Imagination
Social Anthropology
Culture Theory
Political Anthropology
Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
Linguistic Anthropology
Urban Anthropology
Culture Change
Applied Anthropology
Religion and Culture
Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
Research Methods in Linguistic Anthropology
Anthropologies of Music
Anthropology of Contemporary Asia
Anthropology of Food
Anthropology of Globalization
Museums, Culture, and Society
Museum Methods
Anthropology of Human Rights
Advanced Topics in Linguistic Anthropology
Laboratory in Ethnographic Techniques
Fieldwork in Ethnology
General Electives (12 Units)
Select four upper division courses from all of the above plus the following:12
Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology
Introductory Statistics for Anthropologists
Ancient Technology
Environmental Archaeology
Techniques of Archaeological Analysis
Cultural Resource Management in Theory and Practice
Japanese Culture and Society
Culture and Society in Mexico
Peoples of Southeast Asia
Anthropology of Chinese Societies
Cultures of South Asia
Primate Adaptations
Human Skeletal Analysis
African Cultures and Societies
Rise of Religious Cults
Bioarchaeology: Analyzing Human Remains from Archaeology Sites
Women Cross-Culturally
Anthropology of the Body
Additional Requirement (3 Units)
Anthropology majors select one statistics course 13
Total Units27
1

e.g. STAT 1, or one approved by the Department

Note: All requirements except General Electives must be completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

Minor in Anthropology

Total units required for minor: 18, twelve must be in upper division.

The Anthropology minor requires 18 units of Anthropology courses; with a minimum of 12 upper division units. There are no specific course requirements. Not more than 3 units of the following may be counted toward the minor.

ANTH 178Internship3 - 4
ANTH 195AFieldwork in Archaeology2
ANTH 195BFieldwork in Ethnology2
ANTH 195CFieldwork in Physical Anthropology2 - 3
ANTH 199Special Problems1 - 3

Graduate Program

The Master of Arts program in Anthropology is designed for students who plan to continue their graduate studies in Anthropology at the Ph.D. level as well as for students who plan to pursue any of the numerous opportunities for graduate anthropologists, such as in private research, Foreign Service, education, and government.

The program centers on a core of general requirements designed to provide each student with a graduate level exposure to the broad discipline of Anthropology, with an emphasis on general methodology and the ways in which problems are conceptualized and approached in at least three of the interrelated sub-disciplines. Beyond this core, each student is encouraged to design a plan of elective coursework relevant to his/her postgraduate goals. The plan may be to continue a broad, unspecialized course of study, or to concentrate on any of the specialties represented by the interests of the faculty.

Following admission to classified standing, each student is assigned a temporary advisor and informally interviewed by the Graduate Studies Committee to determine the scope of his/her interests and academic background and to establish the plan for elective coursework. After the graduate interview, the student forms a Thesis Committee composed of a graduate advisor and at least one additional member of the Anthropology faculty. The responsibility of the Thesis Committee is to provide general academic advice and to guide the student in conducting research and writing the thesis.

Students may develop their special interests through individual arrangements with their faculty advisors, or they may take advantage of opportunities for special training in such areas of Applied Anthropology as cultural resource management, museology, Anthropology in education, and medical Anthropology through participation in ongoing informal programs which may include special field work or intern placement with local agencies. Prospective students should obtain a copy of the most recent Department of Anthropology Graduate Study Brochure for updated information on special opportunities.

Admission Requirements

Admission to classified graduate standing in Anthropology requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum 3.0 GPA for the last 60 units attempted.

Admission Procedures

Graduate students are considered once a year for admission for the fall semester. To ensure consideration of admission for the following year, applicants must complete a university application and a separate departmental application by the posted application deadline dates for the term applying. For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/.

Notes:

  • an application for admission and a supplemental application for graduate admission (forms A and B in the CSU application booklet); and
  • two complete sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

At the same time, applicants must submit to the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Anthropology: a letter describing their academic background and present interests, two signed letters of recommendation on official letterhead from individuals who can assess the applicant's potential for graduate study, and results of the General Graduate Record Examination and Graduate Record Examination Writing Assessment.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of graduate study. This procedure may begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units of 200-level Anthropology courses with a minimum 3.0 GPA;
  • completed a Thesis Prospectus Review; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Students should consult the Department's current Graduate Program Brochure for deadlines.

Preliminary Examination: Passing the Preliminary Examination is a prerequisite to Advancement to Candidacy.

Note: Students may not enroll in ANTH 500 until Advanced to Candidacy. Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies. The student fills out the form after planning a program of study in consultation with his/her Anthropology faculty advisors. The completed form is then returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

MA in Anthropology

Units required for the MA: 30 with a minimum 3.0 GPA.

Required Courses (6 Units) 1
Select seminar in area of study and select one of the following:6
Biological Anthropology Seminar
Archaeology
Ethnology
Language and Culture
Electives (21 Units)
Select any graduate level or advanced upper division courses 221
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
ANTH 500Master's Thesis3
Total Units30
1

Grade "B-" or better required in each course listed.

2

Three (9 units) must be graduate level seminars in the Anthropology Department. Specific electives must be approved in advance by the student's Thesis Committee.

No more than 3 units of ANTH 278 or ANTH 299 may be applied to the MA. ANTH 278 and ANTH 299 courses that have passed the seven-year University limit may not be applied to the MA.

How to Read Course Descriptions

ANTH 1.     Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Life Forms (B2)


Covers the concepts, methods of inquiry, and theory of biological evolution and their application to the human species. There is a specific focus on molecular, Mendelian and population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, primatology, paleoanthropology, biocultural adaptations, and human variation. The scientific method serves as the foundation to the course.

ANTH 1A.     Biological Anthropology Laboratory. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1 (may be taken concurrently)

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Laboratory (B3), Life Forms (B2)


Designed to familiarize the student with the materials and techniques of physical anthropology. Includes human and other primate osteology, anthropometric techniques, and allied methods in the gathering and analysis of physical anthropological data. Through working with the departmental collection of fossil casts and a wide variety of charts and models, the student also becomes familiar with the stages of human and primate evolution.

ANTH 2.     Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Introduction to anthropological approaches in the study of people and cultures. Using ethnographic case studies, the course contributes to a critical understanding of continuity and diversity in peoples' lifestyles, social institutions, and cultural practices in different societies around the world. The course also examines the impact of political, economic, and social changes, such as colonization, decolonization, and globalization on people and cultures over the last century.

ANTH 2H.     Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors. 3 Units


Introduction to anthropological approaches in the study of people and cultures. Using ethnographic case studies, contributes to a critical understanding of the continuity and diversity in peoples' lifestyles, social institutions, and cultural practices in different societies around the world. Examines the impact of political, economic, and social changes, such as colonization, decolonization, globalization, etc., on people and cultures over the last century. Intended for students enrolled in the University's GE Honors Program.

Note: Students must be admitted to the GE Honors Program.

ANTH 3.     Introduction to Archaeology. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Introduces students to the methods and theories used by archaeologists to find, recover, and interpret such remains in an effort to reconstruct and understand the lives of earlier peoples. The class uses archaeological case studies, films, and hands-on examples of tools and other artifacts produced by simple stone age hunters and more complex civilizations that lived in California and other parts of the world.

ANTH 4.     Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Critical Thinking (A3)


Introduction to the abstract and formal structures of language and cultural dimensions of human communication via major linguistic anthropological concepts, theoretical assumptions, and methodologies. Addresses the logical, formal relationship between underlying rules of natural languages while critically analyzing how speakers from different cultures use language to convey complex social and cultural information. Course illuminates how language is used to create and reinforce relationships of power (race, class, gender); develops ability to recognize linguistic fallacies; and instructs in basic critical thinking skills.

ANTH 13.     Magic, Witchcraft and Religion. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Cross-cultural study of the forms and functions of supernatural beliefs and associated rituals in various societies of Africa, Asia, aboriginal Australia, Oceania, South America, native North America and elsewhere. Emphasis is on understanding beliefs and rituals within given social contexts, and using broad comparisons to derive insight into the general functions of beliefs and rituals in human life.

ANTH 15.     World Prehistory and the Evolution of Modern Humanity. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Further Studies in Area B (B5)


Introduction to the broad sweep of world prehistory, from the emergence of human culture through the development of domestication of plants and animals, and to the origins of complex societies. Included are major cultural developments on every continent, emphasizing similarities and differences in the nature and timing of key technological, cultural, and sociological changes. Methodologies for learning about the past, major archaeological discoveries, important personalities, and contributions to the modern world are discussed in the context of understanding the strengths and limitations of a scientific approach to human prehistory.

ANTH 16.     Comparative Early Civilizations. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Examines the emergence and development of early civilizations. Studies state formation, urbanization, market system development, and other processes relevant to the evolution of early civilizations from the standpoints of cross-cultural comparison and modern anthropological theory. The goal is to identify cross-cultural regularities as well as critical differences that can explain the various evolutionary trajectories of these societies. The civilizations that will be contrasted include societies from Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, Mesoamerica, Andean South America, and other regions.

ANTH 17.     Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Further Studies in Area B (B5)


Overview of forensic anthropology - an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropologists answer questions of medicolegal significance by applying techniques designed for the analysis of human skeletal remains. Includes the full range of problems associated with human skeletal identification and trauma analysis. These problems serve as a model for understanding the broader aspects of applied anthropology and its role working with law enforcement agencies, human rights issues, and ethical considerations.

ANTH 21.     Freshman Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Understanding Personal Development (E)


Introduction to the nature and possible meanings of higher education, and the functions and resources of the University. Designed to help students develop and exercise fundamental academic success strategies and to improve their basic learning skills. Provides students with the opportunity to interact with fellow classmates and the seminar leader to build a community of academic support and personal support.

ANTH 101.     Cultural Diversity. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: United States History, Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), GE AREA D


Focuses on analyzing the historically conditioned political, economic and social factors that have contributed to cultural diversity in the U.S; a critical anthropological approach is developed to explore the intersection of race, class, gender, ethnicity and sexuality; the political economy of institutions and ideas, such as racism, classism, sexual stereotyping, family, religion, state, color-blindness, multiculturalism, etc.; and, discourses of cultural diversity in the U.S.

ANTH 102.     The Nature of Culture. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), GE AREA D


An upper division general introduction to cultural anthropology. Divided into two major parts: a survey of theories, methods and concepts of cultural anthropology, and an introduction to applied cultural anthropology.

ANTH 103.     Psychological Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 or ANTH 102.


Cross-cultural comparative approach to human cognition, child-training practices, personality development, deviant behavior, cultural psychiatry, and data gathering techniques.

ANTH 104.     The History of Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Anthropological theory in historical perspective.

ANTH 105.     Anthropology of War. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Examination of the nature of war, primarily as it occurs in pre-industrial societies, and a survey of the kinds of explanations of this phenomenon current in anthropology. Emphasis is on understanding the complexity, variability, and cultural imbeddedness of war as it occurs around the world.

ANTH 106.     Culture and Personality of the Chicano Child. 3 Units


Study of child growth and development patterns universal to all children with focus on the pressures and effects of the Mexican and Anglo cultures on the development of the Chicano child.

ANTH 107.     Anthropology of Hunters and Gatherers. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Survey of the rapidly disappearing life way which anthropologists call hunting and gathering, with economies based on the use of wild plant and animal resources. Using ethnographic examples from the Arctic, southern Africa, rainforests in South America, deserts of Australia, and western North America, explores variation in hunter-gatherer societies with respect to differences in environment, technology, social organization, and the historical effects of interaction with more complex cultural groups. Models that attempt to explain long-term changes in this life way are also explored.

ANTH 108.     Economic Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


What happens to society when exchange fails? The root of economy is the household, whose members make a living in relation to other people, and in culturally shaped ways. The ''world economic system" of the late 20th Century global village consists of many ill-fitting parts with different histories and goals. These functioning and changing households, markets, technologies, and concepts of work, property, and the good life are studied from a cross-cultural perspective. Also focuses on the impact of industrial societies on tribal and peasant economies.

ANTH 109.     Ecological and Evolutionary Approaches to Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Survey of anthropological research regarding the relationships between human behavior, ecology, and evolution. Reviews historic development of research in this field, and contrasts approaches based in ecological and evolutionary theory. Reviews and evaluates of case studies. Topics include hunter-gatherer and hominid economy and social organization, foraging theory, work effort, population growth and regulation, origins of agriculture, warfare, ritual and resource conservation, and origins of complex society.

ANTH 110.     Archaeological Method and Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.


Traces the development of archaeology from its inception in the eighteenth century up to the present time. Readings, lectures, and class assignments follow the evolution of archaeological method and theory in relation to changing ideas about the role of culture, environment, and technology within the broader discipline of anthropology.

ANTH 111.     California Archaeology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Pre-contact California encompassed some of the most extensive environmental and cultural diversity ever to exist on the planet, containing widely divergent biota, many distinct languages and cultures, and among the densest hunter-gatherer populations ever recorded. At least 11,000-12,000 years of human occupation have been marked by multiple migrations and major shifts in technological and social organization. Explores long-term trends in cultural development across the state, and examines models used to explain why semi-permanent settlements, intensive subsistence strategies, and complex social institutions arose in some times/places and not others.

ANTH 112.     Great Basin Archaeology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Explores the cultural and natural history of the Great Basin from the last glacial maximum into the historic era. Though largely arid, this region in fact manifests considerable environmental variability and has seen significant climatic alterations since the Pleistocene. Human occupation of the Great Basin witnessed major changes in demography, technology, subsistence practices, and sociopolitical organization over the last 10-12,000 years. The course looks to understand cultural and environmental variability across the region through examination of the long-term material record and consideration of anthropological and biological models.

ANTH 113.     Prehistory of the Southwest. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Survey of the prehistory of the Arizona, New Mexico, Western Colorado, Utah, and adjacent regions of Nevada, Texas and northwestern Mexico. Major prehistoric cultures of the Southwest (Hohokam, Anasazi, Mogollon, Fremont) are covered in detail. Focus on major transitions in subsistence and social organization emphasizing current issues of archaeological research. Cultural influences from outside areas are also considered.

ANTH 114.     North American Prehistory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Familiarizes students with the archaeological record of North America, and provides an analytical framework through which it may be understood in anthropologically meaningful terms. This will be accomplished by considering some of the explanations that have been proposed to account for the prehistory of the continent, and by examining the archaeological remains and cultural sequences found in various areas, including the North and Southeast, Great Plains, Pacific Northwest, and arctic/subarctic regions.

ANTH 115.     Origins of Agriculture. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Surveys and evaluates worldwide anthropological perspectives of the origins of agriculture and the rise of complex society. Traces the development of major archaeological theories for the inception and spread of agriculture and civilization, acquainting students with groundbreaking archaeological research associated with each theoretical perspective. Current archaeological research is reviewed in-depth, providing a context for critique of the theories. Examples from North America, Latin America, the Middle East, India and China are compared and contrasted using movies, readings, and lectures.

ANTH 116.     Old World Prehistory: Paleolithic Archaeology. 3 Units


Old World Paleolithic archaeology from the emergence of hominids until the development of agriculture and civilization. Cultural developments in Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia are examined with the aim of highlighting similarities and differences in the process of technological, demographic, and sociopolitical change within each region. Explanatory models are offered to account for cultural evolution in various parts of the Old World are explored and assessed.

ANTH 120.     Introductory Statistics for Anthropologists. 3 Units


Covers the conceptual framework involved in quantitative methods of data analysis commonly employed in anthropology. The emphasis is primarily on understanding concepts and secondarily on learning techniques of data analysis. Topics include data description and distributions, estimation procedures, hypothesis testing, and model fitting. Illustration of concepts in lecture are made with data from archaeology, physical anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology.

ANTH 121.     Archaeology of Mexico. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Provides an upper division introduction to the archeology of Mesoamerica for students not majoring in anthropology. Discusses the evolution of the ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica, including Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador. Examines the development of societies from the earliest inhabitants to the growth of empires. Includes coverage of the Olmecs, Monte Alban, Teotihuacan, the Classic Maya, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs.

Note: Cannot be used to meet the requirements of the Anthropology major; interested majors should take ANTH 122.

ANTH 122.     The Evolution of Early Mesoamerican States. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Traces the emergence of pre-hispanic state societies in Mesoamerica from the growth of the earliest settlements to the collapse of the Aztec empire. Analyzes how complex societies evolved in Mesoamerica, focusing on such evidence as household and village social organization, craft specialization and interregional exchange, religion and ideology, and the logistics of state management and imperial expansion.

ANTH 123.     Ancient Technology. 3 Units


Examines the importance of various preindustrial technologies, and the techniques and methods involved in their manufacture and use. Topics include stone, bone, wood, and hide working, ceramics, weaving, metallurgy, and other crafts essential to human survival in ancient and contemporary societies around the world.

ANTH 124.     Environmental Archaeology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


All human societies depend on their natural surroundings, and so the reconstruction of prehistoric environments is an essential part of archaeological interpretation. Three interrelated aspects of environmental archaeology are considered: (1) general approaches to paleoenvironmental reconstruction, employing various biological and geological indicators; (2) the analysis of human plant and animal food remains; and (3) the geological and other processes that are responsible for the formation of archaeological deposits. Field trip.

Field trip(s) may be required.

ANTH 125.     Historical Archaeology. 3 Units


Written history only records a small portion of human activities that occurred in the recent past. Explores the numerous methods of investigation, analysis and interpretation that are available to aid the historical archaeologist in discovering missing information and in some cases correcting erroneous statements, assumptions and interpretations about the past.

ANTH 126.     Techniques of Archaeological Analysis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.


Introduces students to various approaches to archaeological analysis, focusing on how different classes of data are collected, classified, and interpreted to resolve research issues. Includes such topics as the handling, treatment, and analysis of flaked and ground stone tools, plant and animal food remains, and other types of archaeological materials. Lecture one hour, laboratory six hours.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

ANTH 127.     Cultural Resource Management in Theory and Practice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


Takes a wide-ranging look at how cultural resources are managed and preserved in California, the greater U.S., and other parts of the world. More than just a review of applicable laws and regulations, it is designed to offer a history of historic preservation, examine its role in our society, and explore the prospects for its continued presence. Practical aspects of Cultural Resource Management (CRM) are reviewed with respect to designing, budgeting, and performing archaeological surveys, site evaluation studies, and data recovery or mitigation programs.

ANTH 128.     Indians of California. 3 Units


Provides a survey of the traditional cultures of California Native American groups as they existed immediately after Western contact. Exploration of the ecological linguistic, economic, social, political, and religious diversity of California Native American groups provides a background for analysis of current anthropological theories of hunter-gatherer adaptations, subsistence intensification, political economy, cultural complexity, and California prehistory.

ANTH 129.     Human Use of Caves From An Archaeological Perspective. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.


Unique character of caves and their deposits present many challenges that cannot always be met with conventional archaeological, methodological and theoretical approaches. Students will be exposed to investigative techniques that facilitate the understanding of these unique archaeological resources. The investigation of the human use of caves through a worldwide perspective provides students with a thorough introduction to the study of these significant resources.

ANTH 130.     Social Justice in Interdisciplinary Perspective. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or instructor permission.


Examines the nature and forms of social justice and injustice. Addresses key philosophical and theoretical models and debates over the meaning of social justice, using historical and contemporary examples to highlight important concepts and controversies. Faculty from different departments within SSIS, and occasionally from other colleges, will address how their discipline understands and analyzes issues of social justice. Students will be encouraged to critically assess the assumptions of various perspectives on social justice, and to address the relationship of academe and social activism in achieving social justice.

Cross listed as ID 124, ENVS 124, ETHN 124, FACS 124 and SOC 124. Only one may be counted for credit.

ANTH 131.     Europe in the Ethnographic Imagination. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


More than a place or "continent," Europe is a social and ideological construction employed to unite diverse linguistic and cultural communities. Focuses on major themes in contemporary Europeanist anthropology, including transformations within and between local communities and regions (especially with regards to Northern Ireland, the former Society bloc, and Yugoslav federation), immigration, neo-nationalist extremism, the changing character of religious institutions, and the European Union as a framework for organizing identity and society.

ANTH 134.     Japanese Culture and Society. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Culture of the Japanese: traditional and modern, rural and urban, cultural and social institutions; village and urban organization; and family structure. Aspects of social change in contemporary rural and urban Japan.

ANTH 135.     Indians of North America. 3 Units


Provides a survey of traditional Native American societies and culture areas north of Mexico. Readings, lectures, and discussions emphasize primary ethnographic and historic data that provide the richest accounts of Amerindian cultures at the time of European contact and shortly thereafter.

ANTH 140.     Social Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Cross-cultural comparisons of the structures and functions of non-literate and complex societies; the diversity of social and territorial units, their analysis and classification; and the study of social organization and control and social change in relation to kinship, marriage and family, lineage and clan, law, politics, economics and religion in diverse societies.

ANTH 141.     Culture Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Exploration of the concepts, dimensions and dynamics of culture theory, viewing culture as an adaptive, comparative, cognitive, structural and symbolic system.

ANTH 142.     Political Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Explores political anthropology as a specialized field of anthropological inquiry. Analyzes the articulation of power, authority, and legitimacy in non-state and state based societies. Contributes to an understanding of the transforming powers of modernity and resistance to it and develops a critical appreciation of how age, status, class, ethnicity, race, gender and religious ideologies shape political order within various societies around the world.

ANTH 143.     Culture and Society in Mexico. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Introduction to the cultural and social institutions of the Mexican people. The changing patterns of family, economic, political, religious, and educational systems in Mexico.

ANTH 144.     Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146


Anthropological analysis of contemporary American culture viewed from the perspective of both internal and external observers, with emphasis on such subjects as cultural myths and social realities, values, ideology and world view, family and cultural transmission, social institutions and structures, religious ceremonies and magical rituals, and other customs and practices that establish American culture as one of the more bizarre and exotic in the world ethnographic literature.

ANTH 145.     Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Exploration of diversity of peoples and cultures in Latin America and the common experiences such as colonialism, ethnicity, and economy that shape their lives. Aspects of culture examined include: race and ethnicity, colonialism and its implications, the state and political institutions, religious systems, kinship and social organization, gender, economic processes, and issues pertaining to environment, urbanization, globalization, nationalism, and transnationalism.

ANTH 146.     Ethnographic Analysis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.


Introduces students to current techniques, theories, and debates in ethnographic research and analysis through the use of ethnographies and related works. Critically examines the production of ethnographic knowledge in socio-cultural anthropology from historical and contemporary perspectives.

ANTH 147.     Peoples of Southeast Asia. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Survey of the native peoples of Southeast Asia (Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma and Singapore). Emphasis is on examining the forms of social and cultural pluralism in contemporary Southeast Asian societies.

ANTH 148.     Anthropology of Chinese Societies. 3 Units


Exploration of the cultures of three Chinese societies (Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the People's Republic of China) in each of their unique historical contexts. A comparison and contrast of how these societies, though sharing a common cultural heritage, have had different paths of development in recent times. Aspects of culture examined include: the state and political institutions; religious systems; kinship and social organization; economic processes; and issues of regional integration, nationalism and transnationalism.

ANTH 149.     Cultures of South Asia. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Exploration of cultural practices in different South Asian societies. Analyzes the impact of colonialism, post-colonialism and discourses of modernity on South Asian societies. Examines the process of state formation, nation-building, communal conflict, economic transformations and the politics of caste, gender and class in contemporary South Asia.

ANTH 150.     Human Osteology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1 and ANTH 1A or BIO 22, or instructor permission.


Provides students a hands-on, in-depth study of human osteology. Learn growth and development of the skeletal tissues and identification of the individual skeletal elements, and practice basic measurements, sexing and aging of skeletal material. A prerequisite for advanced techniques in forensic anthropology. Three-hour seminar; students will work with the department's osteological materials

ANTH 151.     Human Paleontology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 1A, or instructor permission.


Survey of the field of human evolution from primate beginnings to modern humans. Emphasizes the interpretation of the fossil evidence and the major trends in hominid evolution, including the origins and relationships of the extinct forms of humans.

ANTH 152.     Primate Adaptations. 3 Units


Covers the significant dental, skeletal, and soft-anatomical adaptations of the major living families and/or subfamilies within the Order Primates. In the process of surveying the adaptations, the student will become familiar with evolutionary theory, taxonomy, embryology, ecology, social systems, biomechanics, effects of size, and the functional morphology of the skeletal system in primates. Three-hour seminar, with some lecture and hands-on experience with skeletons and casts.

ANTH 153.     Evolutionary Medicine. 3 Units


Introduction to the application of evolutionary theory to human health and disease. Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary specialization utilizing insights from evolutionary theory and human evolutionary ecology to inform understandings of human health, development and disease; and also to critique existing biomedical theory about the human condition. Topics include reproduction, child birth, lactation, growth and development, infectious diseases, parasites, diet and nutrition, mental and behavioral disorders, and substance use and addiction.

Note: ANTH 1, BIO 10, BIO 11, or PSYC 2 recommended.

ANTH 154.     Primate Behavior. 3 Units


Survey of the genetic, ecological and social influences on non-human primate behavior from an evolutionary perspective; covers the major non-human primate groups, including their taxonomy, major adaptations, and their present geographic distribution. The history and development of primate behavior also will be considered with an emphasis on various models for interpreting behavior.

ANTH 155.     Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1 and ANTH 1A.


Survey of the development of method and theory in physical anthropology from its origins in zoology, anatomy, and medicine, to the various approaches currently used in the study of human biology and evolution. Concepts considered include the scientific method, modern genetics, evolutionary theory, the race concept and other approaches to explaining human variation, taxonomy and systematics, and macro-evolutionary models. Critical reading and analytical skills will be emphasized.

ANTH 156.     Evolution of Human Behavior. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, BIO 10, or PSYC 2 recommended.


Introduction to the application of evolutionary theory to human behavior and psychology. Reviews and contrasts contemporary perspectives of human behavioral evolution with emphasis on insights from the emerging field of evolutionary psychology. Topics include human behavior and cognition as adaptations, "selfish genes," game theory, evolution of social behavior, evolution of altruism, human mating strategies, parenting, behavioral disorders, evolution of the life cycle, human behavioral ecology, Darwinian medicine, and evolutionary psychology.

ANTH 157.     Human Variation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, BIO 10, or instructor permission.


Survey of the basic principles of human genetics with emphasis on the mechanisms that shape human evolution and the development of human races. Analyzes the laws of heredity as exhibited in modern human populations and human adaptability to climatic extremes. Historical development of concepts. Discussion of most current research.

ANTH 158.     Human Skeletal Analysis. 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 150.


Provides advanced techniques in osteology and forensic anthropology essential for many practicing physical anthropologists. Discussion and survey of the primary literature, followed by intensive hands-on experience with human skeletal remains. Included: techniques for determining age, sex and ethnicity; measurement; pathology; and trauma. The role of the forensic anthropologist and archaeologist, ethical considerations, and human rights issues are also covered. Three-hour seminar, and a three-hour lab involving substantial hands-on experience with human skeletal remains.

ANTH 160.     Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 4 or instructor permission.


Introduction to language and linguistics for anthropologists with emphasis on the role of linguistic anthropology in the development of theory and method within the discipline; non-human communication systems, language acquisition, and culture theory; the fundamentals of descriptive and structural linguistics; types of human languages; the diversity and distribution of languages from prehistoric to modern times; fundamentals of historical linguistics and proto-cultural studies.

ANTH 161.     African Cultures and Societies. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor approval


Explores the cultural richness and regional variation of African societies. Engages students with central issues and debates pertaining to Africa in relation to the deepening global interconnectedness of the human socio-cultural worlds. Topical discussions include: colonial legacy, the postcolonial state and traditional authority; ethnic identity and cultural diversity; family, kinship and the African youth; masculinity, sexuality and women; Islam, Christianity and indigenous spirituality; health, poverty and development; migration and globalization; ecotourism and African cultures.

ANTH 162.     Language and Culture. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 4 or instructor permission.


Relationship between language and culture; historical relationships between languages; language families and major cultural traditions; cross-cultural studies of how the language influences perception and the organization of reality; the ways in which language is embedded in social life and practices, and the ways in which various cultural patterns and values are reflected in language.

ANTH 163.     Urban Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Overview of both anthropological method and theory applied to research of urban environments and a survey of significant anthropological studies that have been conducted in these settings. Examines such topics as the urbanization process, the culture of cities, urban sub-cultures, social problems in urban areas, social networks and adaptive kinship strategies in cities, and the concentration and exercise of power, wealth and influence in urban centers.

ANTH 164.     Culture Change. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Anthropological study of mechanisms and process of social and culture change; basic theories of ecological adaptation and cultural evolution; action chains and cultural patterns; technological innovation, migration, acculturation, cultural dissonance, conflict, and cultural revitalization; analysis of case studies emphasizing contemporary conditions and problems; rapid technological innovation, population control, immigration and acculturation, social diversification, ethnic conflict.

ANTH 165.     Applied Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 105 or ANTH 108 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 or ANTH 142 or ANTH 167 or ANTH 168 or ANTH 176


Provides tools for exploring the application of an anthropological paradigm to various aspects of culture change and conflict. Content is organized into a series of critical topical areas such as modernization, economic development, human services, and urbanization.

ANTH 166.     Rise of Religious Cults. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2)


Examination of cult movements, involving comparisons of the ideals, objectives and symbolic processes common to ecstatic religious movements throughout the world -- from Melanesian cargo cults to the Peoples' Temple. Anthropological perspectives are used to examine religious cults as conscious attempts to perpetuate traditional values and social goals or to radically change the status quo; millenarian movements, crisis cults, nature communes, exotic religious importations, and cult characteristics of modern secular movements.

ANTH 167.     Religion and Culture. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Examines ethnographic perspectives on the character and intersections of religion, ritual, and culture. Surveys the thought of "classical" social theorists (e.g., Durkheim, Tylor, Weber, and Evans-Pritchard), and concentrates on central topics in the anthropology of religion. Including the political nature of embodiment and trance, religion and nationalism, the significance of language and performance, the gendered character of many religious phenomena, and science and religion as competing epistemologies.

ANTH 168.     Folklore in Anthropological Perspective. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or instructor permission.


Anthropological contributions to the study of folklore; survey of oral literature and other folklore forms, such as myth, folktale, legend, proverb, riddle, and games, in their social contexts; folklore as "autobiographical ethnography," folklore in everyday life, survey and comparison of folklore traditions in several culture areas.

ANTH 169.     Research Methods in Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or instructor permission.


Consideration of language in its social context: language and power, language and gender, interethnic communication, language and race, pidgins and creoles, multilingualism, standardization, language ideology. Instruction in ethnographic and linguistic methods of data collection and analysis; identification of socially significant linguistic variables. Contributions of the study of contextualized speech to linguistic theory.

ANTH 170.     The Religious Landscape of the Sacramento Valley. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Humanities (Area C2), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Introduction to the field study of religious communities. Addresses the nature of religious pluralism in the U.S. today. The practice and belief systems of at least five different religious communities will be studied each semester. Students are required to do an in-depth term project based on research in one or more religious communities.

Cross Listed: HRS 170; only one may be counted for credit.

ANTH 171.     Bioarchaeology: Analyzing Human Remains from Archaeology Sites. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1 and ANTH 1A or instructor permission


An exploration of research conducted on human remains from archaeological sites, including historical and ethical perspectives. Examines the effects of funerary context and preservation on skeletal remains. Demonstrates relevance of human skeletal analysis to understanding demography, causes of human skeletal variation, dietary patterns, and relevant themes in paleopathological research. Special emphasis placed on infectious disease, growth and development, activity patterns, injury and trauma, craniofacial adaptations, and methods for identifying genetic relationships in human skeletal remains.

ANTH 172.     Anthropologies of Music. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or Instructor Permission.


Introduces students to current anthropological research on social groups and cultural practices that orient around and draw inspiration from music, wherever and however it is conceived. Course focus is not on music theory or structure; rather, it critically examines anthropological and ethnographic works that focus on the relations among such social domains and features as visual and aural aesthetics, political belief, gender, ritual, religion, race, and ethnicity.

ANTH 173.     Anthropology of Contemporary Asia. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission


This course examines contemporary Asia as an articulation of intersecting historical, cultural, political and economic processes. The course will focus on postcolonial developments and critically explore the manner in which process of globalization and neoliberal strategies embed themselves within, and the responses they elicit from societies across Asia.

ANTH 174.     Anthropology of Food. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission


Examines food and eating from an anthropological perspective. Demonstrates how food communicates social messages about individual or group identity, creates social boundaries or forges belonging, and can reflect one's politics, values, and ethics. Through ethnographic examples and attention to global processes, this course explores food production, circulation, and consumption.

ANTH 175.     Anthropology of Globalization. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission


The course introduces students to major themes that inform anthropological understanding of globalization. This course will explore theoretical perspectives, topics, and methods of analysis developed in anthropology to capture the effects of intermingling global/local cultural forces and the diverse relations of power that structure them and in which they are embedded.

ANTH 176.     Museums, Culture, and Society. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Provides an introduction to museum anthropology. Surveys the emergence of modern anthropology from its origins in 17th century natural history to its late 19th century institutionalization in museums. Explores the role of collectors, curators and financial patrons in the development of museums and social theory. Examines the contemporary poetics and politics of museums and cultural interpretation, including cultural property rights, cultural self-representation, collaborative exhibit development, and the ethnography of museums.

ANTH 177.     Museum Methods. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 176


Combined lecture and laboratory course designed to teach basic museum methods. Surveys contemporary issues and practices in museum governance, management, interpretation, and evaluation. Provides hands-on collections and exhibit experience, including participation in the design, fabrication and installation of an exhibition.

ANTH 178.     Internship. 3 - 4 Units


Practical experience in an approved professional environment. Student intern will work directly with professionals in public and private agencies where opportunities exist for anthropological work. Supervision and evaluation are provided by a faculty internship director and the on-site supervisor. Placements require from 15-20 hours per week.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ANTH 181.     Anthropology of Human Rights. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 146 or instructor permission.


Examines multiple dimensions of human rights from an anthropological perspective. Explores the history and development of human rights ideas and legal conventions, and how these ideas and conventions are appropriated, adapted, contested or rejected in different cultural and political contexts. Using ethnographic case studies from around the world, addresses how the human rights discourse mediates the relationship between specific groups of people, their national states and international conventions and institutions.

ANTH 183.     Women Cross-Culturally. 3 Units

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Position of women in various societies, preliterate through contemporary industrial; the evolution of women's roles and rights cross-culturally.

ANTH 186.     Culture and Poverty. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M or ENGL 109W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70 or 71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area/Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI), GE AREA D


Analyzes poverty in American society: the cross-cultural context, social inequality in the U.S., theoretical perspectives and their influence on policy, present trends and implications for the future.

ANTH 188.     Anthropology of the Body. 3 Units


Study of the diverse ways that humans explain and attempt to alter the human body. Focus is on the meanings and implications of our own bodily experiences through objective comparison of the experiences, explanations and techniques found in our society with those in others.

ANTH 190.     Advanced Topics in Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 160 or ANTH 162 or instructor permission.


Seminar examining contemporary developments in theories and methods of linguistic anthropology.

Note: May be repeated for credit providing the topic and instructor are not the same.

ANTH 191.     Anthropology Practicum. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 165 or ANTH 169 or ANTH 177 or ANTH 192B; and senior level


Students work 3-6 hours per week off campus in one of several research institutions under the supervision of institutional personnel. Students are required to become familiar with the scholarly literature relevant to their placement, to participate in on-campus meetings, and to write a research paper integrating the research and fieldwork aspects of the practicum. Permission of instructor and ANTH coordinator required prior to registration. Open to seniors only.

ANTH 192A.     Laboratory Work in Archaeology. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3

Corequisite(s): ANTH 195A; may be waived with instructor permission.


Introduces methods used in the basic laboratory preservation, cataloging, and initial analysis of various materials recovered through ANTH 195A survey and excavation projects; always offered in conjunction with ANTH 195A.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ANTH 192B.     Laboratory in Ethnographic Techniques. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 105 or ANTH 108 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 or ANTH 142 or ANTH 167 or ANTH 168 or ANTH 176

Corequisite(s): ANTH 195B.


Design and discussion of research strategies, primary ethnographic techniques, the development of interviewing skills, and practice in the use of various recording technologies.

Note: Open only to anthropology majors, except with instructor permission.

ANTH 195A.     Fieldwork in Archaeology. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3

Corequisite(s): ANTH 192B


Introduction to archaeological field methods, covering practical aspects of how to identify and investigate isolated artifact finds, particular sites and features, and entire landscapes. Covering survey and excavation techniques, basic approaches to sampling, mapping and navigation, stratigraphic excavation, artifact and feature recording, and recovery methods.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ANTH 195B.     Fieldwork in Ethnology. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 105 or ANTH 108 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 141 or ANTH 142 or ANTH 167 or ANTH 168 or ANTH 176

Corequisite(s): ANTH 192B


Directed team fieldwork in ethnology.

Note: Limited to anthropology majors, except with instructor permission.

ANTH 195C.     Fieldwork in Physical Anthropology. 2 - 3 Units


Individual or group fieldwork in various areas of physical anthropology, under the supervision of individual faculty members; may involve related supervised laboratory work.

ANTH 196S.     Senior Seminar in Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Anthropology majors with senior standing


Anthropology approaches knowledge about the human condition from multidisciplinary perspectives. This senior seminar synthesizes fundamental themes from among the sub-disciplines. Students will engage with concepts and issues from different anthropological perspectives, and then work to identify common historical, methodological and theoretical anthropological themes. On completion of the course, students will have learned to seek and interpret anthropological knowledge in a holistic fashion.

ANTH 196T.     Zooarchaeology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3


An examination of past and recent research conducted on animal remains from archaeological sites. Discussion and survey of the primary literature in evaluating the role animal exploitation plays in human evolution and among small scale foraging, pastoralist, and complex societies. Emphasis on vertebrate taphonomy, reconstruction of diet from faunal remains, and ecological and evolutionary theory to understand human-animal relationships through time.

ANTH 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the faculty member under whom the individual work is to be conducted and the Department chair.


Individual projects or directed reading.

Note: Open only to students who appear competent to carry on individual work. May be repeated for credit.

Credit/No Credit

ANTH 200.     General Methods in Anthropology. 3 Units


Explores uses of scientific methodology in anthropology through the examination of specific case studies in the various specialties. Focus is on the relationship among techniques, methods, and methodology; hypothesis and theory; units of analysis and comparison; deductive and inductive reasoning; inferential processes; various types of comparison (casual, controlled, hologeistic); limitations of, and objections to, ''the comparative method."

ANTH 201.     Anthropological Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status in anthropology or instructor permission.


Intensive reading and seminar discussion in topics on anthropological theory and research.

Note: May be repeated for credit provided topic is not repeated.

ANTH 202.     Biological Anthropology Seminar. 3 Units


Survey of contemporary issues in physical anthropology.

ANTH 203.     Archaeology. 3 Units


Explores the intellectual development of archaeological method and theory; examines the history of archaeological thought from its advent to the present day, looking in detail at pre-scientific, culture-historical, processual, and post-processual approaches to the discipline; emphasis is placed on the role of archaeology as a branch of anthropology and as a historical, humanistic, and/or scientific enterprise.

ANTH 204.     Current Problems in Archaeological Method and Theory. 3 Units


Explores recent methodological and theoretical developments within archaeology; focus is on contemporary debates within the discipline; topical coverage varies; examines conceptual and practical concerns, highlighting possibilities and limitations of new approaches to archaeological problems.

Note: May be repeated for credit provided topic and instructor are not repeated.

ANTH 205.     Ethnology. 3 Units


Seminar is designed for students to develop a working knowledge of anthropological approaches to a number of major issues in ethnology. The focus is on the analysis of case studies.

Note: May be repeated once for credit with different instructor.

ANTH 207.     Language and Culture. 3 Units


Critical examination of contemporary studies in the relationship between language and culture; nonhuman primate communication and the origin of speech; non-verbal communication; historical linguistics; comparative semiology; ethnosemantics; applications of linguistic models of analysis in the study of culture.

Note: May be repeated for credit given that the instructor changes.

ANTH 222.     Bioarchaeology Seminar. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status in anthropology.


Provides an intensive, detailed discussion of method and theory in the skeletal biology of past human populations. Topics discussed include: demography, dietary analysis, mortuary dimensions, health and disease, biological distance and DNA analysis. Focuses on the interaction of biology and behavior, particularly the influence of culture and the environment on the skeletal and dental tissues.

ANTH 223.     Areal Archaeology. 3 Units


Provides an intensive examination of archaeological problems within a selected regional or topical area. Through general readings and case studies, students will critically assess how current perspectives regarding relevant issues have evolved and determine how contemporary viewpoints might be improved or expanded.

Note: May be repeated for credit provided topic and instructor are not repeated.

ANTH 226.     Advanced Techniques of Archaeological Analysis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 126 or instructor permission.


Examines more refined approaches to archaeological analysis, focusing on how various classes of data are collected, classified, and interpreted to resolve directed research problems. Emphasis is on such topics as sampling procedures and statistical assessment of data rather than descriptive analysis and interpretation. Lecture one hour; laboratory six hours.

ANTH 276.     Museum Anthropology. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status in Anthropology or instructor permission.


Surveys the practical, theoretical, and historical dimensions of museum anthropology and material culture studies, with particular emphasis on the U.S. and California. Situates contemporary issues related to the collection, exhibition, and repatriation of ethnographic and archaeological materials within the sociopolitical context of the globally based indigenous rights movement.

Note: Recommended for graduate students who plan to intern in the Anthropology Museum.

ANTH 278.     Internship. 3 - 4 Units


Practical graduate level experience in an approved professional environment. Student intern will work directly with professionals in public and private agencies where opportunities exist for anthropological work. Supervision and evaluation are provided by a faculty internship director and the on-site supervisor. Placements require from 15-20 hours per week.

Note: May be repeated for credit given that topic and instructor changes.

Credit/No Credit

ANTH 292A.     Laboratory Work in Archaeology. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 192A.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 295A.


Laboratory preservation, cataloging and initial analysis of materials recovered through archaeological fieldwork. Graduate students are expected to help supervise undergraduate students and complete a self-directed project under the supervision of the instructor.

Note: Participant must have already completed ANTH 192A or its equivalent. May be repeated once for credit.

ANTH 295A.     Fieldwork in Archaeology. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 195A or equivalent.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 292A.


Students will assist the instructor in supervising undergraduate students or complete an assigned project in addition to the required fieldwork.

Note: May be repeated given that the topic and instructor changes.

ANTH 295B.     Fieldwork in Ethnology. 2 - 3 Units


Supervised graduate level fieldwork in ethnology and ethnography.

ANTH 295C.     Fieldwork in Physical Anthropology. 2 - 3 Units


Supervised graduate level fieldwork in physical anthropology. May include laboratory research.

ANTH 299.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Approval of faculty member under whom individual work is to be conducted and the Department chair.


Individual projects or directed reading.

Note: Open only to students who appear competent to carry on individual work at the graduate level; May be repeated given that topic and instructor changes; May be taken twice in the same semester.

Credit/No Credit

ANTH 500.     Master's Thesis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy and chair permission of his/her thesis committee.


Completion of a thesis approved for the master's degree. Number of units of credit is determined by the candidate's Master's degree advisory committee. Should be taken in final semester prior to the completion of all requirements for the degree.