Graduate and Professional Studies in Education

College of Education - Graduate and Professional Studies in Education

Educational Leadership

What makes an effective educational leader? What characteristics and traits are predictive of successful careers in leadership? Does a leader have to be employed in a management position to provide leadership? How do leaders "do more with less" in lean times? What management and leadership skills are necessary to effectively operate today's schools, colleges and universities?

Education in California continues to face uncertainties; resources continue to dwindle while the task of educating today's generations for tomorrow grows ever more important and complex every day. The challenges have likely never been greater. Effective -- not just "good" -- leadership at all levels of education - public, private and higher education -- has probably never been more important.

The programs in Educational Leadership are designed to meet a variety of needs in the field. The programs are oriented toward an interdisciplinary approach to the study of school leadership, offering students opportunities to apply theory to the practice of educational leadership.

The mission of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies is to develop educational leaders from diverse backgrounds who will positively impact the improvement of educational institutions and environments - from pre-K through university and professional levels. These leaders will:

  • be visionary change agents;
  • create collaborative learning communities;
  • engage in reflective practice;
  • ensure diversity and equity;
  • implement research-based practices and site-based best practices; and
  • build capacity through leadership development.

Options

  • Credential: Preliminary Administrative Services / Preliminary Administrative Services Internship
  • MA in Education: P-12 School Leadership
  • MA in Education: Higher Education Leadership

Special Features

  • EDLP program graduates serve in a broad variety of leadership and management positions throughout the region and the country. Some have chosen to pursue doctoral studies in Educational Leadership after completing their Master's level studies and have gained critical experience in leadership. All Educational Leadership programs are organized to be cohort-based. Groups of students admitted each application cycle will take all of their courses together. Enrollments are predictable, and a course of study can be planned in advance in relation to the availability of highly qualified faculty. Cohorts provide students a foundation from which to build important professional support networks with their classmates/colleagues, while facilitating collaborative and cooperative learning experiences throughout the program and into their careers.
  • A significant dimension of all of the programs in Educational Leadership is an interest in, and commitment to, the full development of student potential and capability. Coursework, advising, and field experiences are carefully orchestrated to ensure a full range of faculty support for student achievement. The student, as a responsible autonomous agent, is expected to assume the role of partner in this effort.
  • EDLP course offerings in all cohorts are hybrid, meaning that some portion of course instruction is delivered online, to maximize access and opportunity.
  • Courses in the MA in Education: Higher Education Leadership are delivered using both hybrid instructional delivery, and executive scheduling wherein students attend face-to-face class session on Friday nights and Saturdays throughout each semester.
  • The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential is designed to be completed in one calendar year, and requires participation in both the winter and summer intersessions.

Master of Arts – Child Development

The Child Development master's program has two concentrations—Theory and Research and Applied Settings. The concentration in Theory and Research is designed to provide an in-depth study of theories of child development, how they inform our research, and how new research informs our theories. This concentration is intended for students interested in pursuing careers in research or teaching or a higher degree in child development or a related discipline. The concentration in Applied Settings is designed to provide background in theory and research regarding child development, with a focus on how this information applies to real-world settings (e.g., education, social work, policy development). This concentration is intended for students interested in pursuing careers working with children or programs that serve children and families.

Note: Child Development students should check the department Web site (csus.edu/coe/academics/) for updates to degree requirements and current issues related to child development. To plan for a timely graduation, students should meet with an advisor each semester. Students who wish to pursue an elementary school (multiple subjects) teaching credential should make an appointment with a child development faculty advisor in the Academic and Program Services Office located in Eureka Hall 401. Students can also access information through the Web sites of the College of Education (www.csus.edu/coe)

Special Features

  • The University's location in the State's capital city provides a variety of unique fieldwork, internship, cooperative learning, and part-time employment opportunities.
  • The quality of instruction and the varying educational and professional backgrounds of the faculty provide a program which meets the diverse demands of the many career options available in this field.
  • Students are given opportunities to observe and participate with children in a variety of settings in the community and on campus. Please contact the Department office for information about the service-learning, cooperative education, and other field-based experiences available.
  • In addition, the program has at its disposal an excellent selection of books and journals in the Library and many films, video and audio tapes, and other media to implement and support instruction.

Career Possibilities

Please note that many of the career possibilities listed below require additional education beyond the baccalaureate degree.

Adoption Counselor · Before and After School Teacher/Director · Child Life Specialist · Community College Instructor · Counselor with a choice of specializations - Career, Community, Marriage, Family and Child, or School – with the addition of MS in Counseling · Early Childhood Special Education Specialist – with addition of ECSE Credential · Elementary School Teacher – with addition of Multiple Subjects Credential · Employer-Sponsored Child Care Teacher/Director · Infant Day Care Teacher / Director · Parent Education Instructor · Pediatric Psychologist · Preschool Teacher or Administrator – with Child Development Permit · Resource and Referral Coordinator · Social Worker

Counselor Education

The 60-unit Master of Science in Counseling prepares professional counselors for employment in a variety of settings such as public and private agencies, universities and colleges, schools and private practice. This degree meets the educational requirements for becoming a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) in the State of California. The 57-unit Pupil Personnel Services, School Counseling Credential prepares professional counselors to work within the K-12 educational system. The programs are clinically oriented, with didactic and experiential courses, a 100-hour clinical practicum, and 600 hours of field experience.

Specializations

Students earning the Master of Science in Counseling are required to specialize in one or more of the following areas:

  • Career Counseling
  • Community Counseling
  • Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling
  • School Counseling
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling

Students who are specializing in School Counseling and intend to be employed in California will need to obtain one of the following two school counseling service credentials:

  • Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential
  • Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Internship Credential

The Career Counseling; Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling; and School Counseling specializations at Sacramento State are applying for national accreditation by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling specialization is nationally accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE). As of July 1, 2017, this program will be accredited by CACREP.

Note: For additional information on credentials, see the “College of Education” section of this catalog. Program requirements are subject to change in order to maintain compliance with relevant state and national certification, licensure, and/or accreditation requirements.  Interested parties should refer to the current student handbook for up to date program information.

Special Features

  • An on-campus Center for Counseling and Diagnostic Services brings clients from off campus to be counseled by students in the program and provides opportunity for video and audio feedback.
  • Trainees provide off-campus counseling in local agencies, school districts, hospitals, and non-profit organizations.
  • The Migrant Education Advisor Program (MEAP), a collaborative partnership with the Office of Migrant Education, the Masters in Counseling Program and participating school districts.
  • Faculty actively support diversity and focus on multicultural counseling skills throughout the curriculum.
  • Classes are offered during the day, late afternoon, and evening.

Master of Science Programs

The Department of Counselor Education offers the Master of Science degree in Counseling with the following areas of specialization:

  • Career Counseling. The Career Counseling Specialization provides students with the knowledge, theory, and skills to work as effective counselors/career development specialists, and consultants in a variety of settings: community-based agencies, schools (K-12), colleges and universities, private practice, business, industry, and government. Students are trained to facilitate a holistic career development/career decision-making/planning process with groups and individuals that integrates personal, social, and career needs. Students develop the skills to address current issues in the 21st century, such as career self-reliance, work/family/life balance, multiculturalism, diversity, and lifelong learning.
  • Community Counseling. Students in the Community Counseling Specialization are trained for a variety of counseling positions in the field of mental health, primarily those found in community agencies. Community counseling services in California include, but are not limited to, the following settings: family support services, child protective services, domestic violence centers, substance abuse centers, pastoral counseling centers, corrections, centers for counseling the elderly, and business and industry. Individuals with a specialization in community counseling may meet the requirements for licensure in most states (excluding California, Hawaii).
  • Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling. The Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Specialization is designed to provide students with all the educational competencies required by the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) for licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT). The program trains professionals to work in a variety of settings, including community agencies, county and state agencies, hospitals and private practice, and prepares students to provide consulting to businesses and agencies. Emphasis is placed on developmental and preventative concerns, especially those of children.
  • School Counseling. The School Counseling Specialization is designed for individuals who seek to become elementary, middle, or secondary school counselors. This program meets the requirements for the K-12 California Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Counseling (PPS-SC). Students in this program are prepared to function as key members of an educational team seeking to optimize children’s academic, socio-emotional, and career development. Students obtain the expertise necessary to lead the educational team in working collaboratively with a broad range of education and human service professionals, paraprofessionals, and community representatives to identify, develop, implement, and evaluate programs that provide key services to both the individual child as well as the systems and subsystems in which the child interacts.
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling. The Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling Specialization offers students the opportunity to gain several specialized skills for working with persons with disabilities. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors work in a wide variety of settings including community agencies, private agencies, enabling centers on college campuses, and state agencies. The program includes training in counseling techniques; the use of medical, psychological, and occupational information; and the impact of disabilities on human behavior. In addition, the skills involved in finding and intake, vocational evaluation, restoration, training, job placement, and follow-up are taught. Independent living, assistive technology and disability rights are topic areas emphasized in the program.

Credential Programs

  • Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential Program. California schools, kindergarten through high school, require their school counselors to have the PPS-SC. Students pursuing the 57-unit PPS-SC Credential follow the exact same course requirements as students with the 60-unit Master’s in Counseling Degree objective who are specializing in school counseling, with the exception of a 3-unit Culminating Requirement. The 60-unit master’s degree is not required, although most students elect to complete the degree. In addition to the PPS-SC course requirements, individuals who obtain the credential must pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), required for all K-12 credentials in California. The program meets all standards established by the California Commission for Teacher Credentialing (CCTC).
  • Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Internship Credential Program. The PPS-SCI enables school districts and other educational agencies to place candidates in school counseling positions prior to the completion of credential requirements, provided that the CBEST has been passed. Requests must originate in writing from the district superintendent or other appropriate officers. The program meets all standards established by the California Commission for Teacher Credentialing (CCTC).

Note: Only students who are already enrolled in the School Counseling specialization at California State University, Sacramento may apply to the Internship Credential Program.

Doctorate in Education Leadership (Ed.D.)

California legislation (SB 724) authored by Senator Jack Scott and signed into law in 2005 authorized the California State University to offer the doctorate (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership.  The Doctor of Education degree offered by the California State University shall be focused on preparing administrative leaders for California public elementary and secondary schools and community colleges and on the knowledge and skills needed by administrators to be effective leaders in California public schools and community colleges. The Doctor of Education degree offered by the California State University in partnership through with the California public elementary and secondary schools and community colleges shall participate substantively in program design, candidate recruitment and admissions, teaching, and program assessment and evaluation. This degree shall enable professionals to earn the degree while working full time.

The California State University, Sacramento doctoral program represents a collaborative effort between the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Program and Department of Public Policy and Administration. This program provides an interdisciplinary program of study. It also represents a partnership with area public schools and community colleges to develop a meaningful course of study and graduate experience.

The program is planned to meet the needs of working professionals who are engaged in the profession of education.  Accordingly, the program will incorporate a variety of innovative measures to facilitate student access. These consist of scheduling courses on a year-round basis, utilizing alternative course formats, including intensive, Friday evening, all-day Saturday, and “in-residence” summer seminars on-campus meeting times, and encouraging students to use their job-related problems as topics for research assignments.  The majority of the program classes will be held on the campus of California State University, Sacramento. However, there may be sessions held with partner institutions in public schools and community colleges to host classes as appropriate.

The California State University, Sacramento doctoral program is organized as a cohort-based program. Groups of students admitted each year will take courses together. This creates several distinct advantages of group membership during graduate study which are intentionally fostered in the program:

  • Cohorts offer support to candidates and provide opportunities for members to learn from one another.
  • Cohorts establish professional ties that often last beyond the doctoral program itself; such networks are valuable in terms of continued professional support and growth.
  • Fostering and monitoring candidates’ progress is enhanced in cohorts. The group carries with it the expectation that all but the occasional candidate will complete the program successfully, including such standard benchmarks as the qualifying examination, advancement to candidacy, and completion of the dissertation.
  • Scheduling an outstanding program of doctoral study can be accomplished more readily for cohorts that have courses in common. Enrollments are predictable, and a course of study can be planned in advance in relation to the availability of highly qualified faculty.
 

Contact Information

Sue Heredia, Chair, Graduate and Professional Studies
Venesha Rosseau, Administrative Support Coordinator II
Eureka Hall 401
(916) 278-6639

Julian Vasquez Heilig, Program Director, Ed.D.
Charles Gossett, Associate Program Director
Phone: (916) 278-2282
FAX: (916) 278-2281
edd@csus.edu
csus.edu/coe/academics/doctorate/index

For more information, visit the Web site for the College of Education at www.csus.edu/coe

Faculty

BORUNDA, ROSE

LEVIN, AL S.

LILES, ELISABETH

WYCOFF, SUSAN E.

CHAVEZ, JOSE

COWAN, GENI

HEILIG, JULIAN VASQUEZ

NEVAREZ, CARLOS

 
 

Credential and Certificate Programs

Services Credential - Preliminary Administrative Services

Admission Requirements

Refer to Admission Requirements and Procedures for the Master of Arts degree in Education - Educational Leadership. In addition, all credential applicants must:

  • have a valid California teaching credential (K-12) requiring a baccalaureate degree and a program of professional preparation including student teaching; or a valid California Designated Subjects Teaching credential provided the applicant also possesses a baccalaureate degree; or a California Pupil Personnel Services credential requiring a baccalaureate degree program of professional preparation including field practice with school-aged students; or a Librarianship credential; or a Health Services School Nurse credential; or a Clinical or Rehabilitative Services credential;
  • provide documentation of registration for the CBEST exam;
  • upon entering the credential program have completed a minimum of 3 years and, by the time of completion of credential requirements, have had 5 years of successful, full-time teaching or pupil personnel experience in public or private schools;
  • GPA in the last 60 units of 2.5 or better
  • Completion, and successful review, of CSU Mentor and program Supplemental application
  • Successful interview with faculty, demonstrating
  • Preparation for graduate level study
  • Some leadership experience
  • Familiarity with current issues in education
  • Knowledge of conflict resolution and negotiation skills
  • Knowledge of K-12 education as a field
  • Entry level understanding of ethical leadership
  • Vision for K-12 education
  • earn a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work presented for the credential

Credential - Preliminary Administrative Services

Units required: 30

Required Courses (24 Units)
EDLP 200ADiversity and Equity in Educational Leadership 13
EDLP 201AFoundations of Educational Leadership 13
EDLP 202ALegal Basis of Education 23
EDLP 203AFinancial Resources Planning and Allocation 33
EDLP 205ACurriculum and Instructional Leadership in K-12 Schools 23
EDLP 206ASupervision and Leadership 13
EDLP 208ASchool Leadership/Management 33
EDLP 209AHuman Resources and Supervision 23
Required Direct Field Experience (6 Units)
EDLP 495AField Study in Educational Leadership 23
EDLP 255Field Experience Seminar3
Total Units30
1

Courses taken fall semester

2

Courses taken spring semester

3

Courses taken summer semester

4

Course offered in winter intersession

Services Credential - Preliminary Administrative Services Internship

Admission Requirements

All applicants must meet all Preliminary Administrative Services Credential admission requirements AND must have been appointed to an administrative position by student's employing school district.

Note: Detailed requirements and procedures for admission to the Administrative Internship program may be obtained at the Department.

Credential - Preliminary Administrative Services Internship

Units required: 77

Required Courses (39 Units)
EDLP 200ADiversity and Equity in Educational Leadership 13
EDLP 201AFoundations of Educational Leadership 13
EDLP 255Field Experience Seminar3
EDLP 401Internship On-the-Job Experience 18
EDLP 402Internship On-the-Job Experience 28
EDLP 403Internship On-the-Job Experience 38
EDLP 413Supplemental Internship Experience 36
Interns that require an additional semester may take the following classes (14 Units)
EDLP 404Internship On-the-Job Experience 48
EDLP 414Supplemental Internship Experience 46
Other Required coursework (15 Units)
EDLP 202ALegal Basis of Education 33
EDLP 203AFinancial Resources Planning and Allocation 33
EDLP 205ACurriculum and Instructional Leadership in K-12 Schools 23
EDLP 209AHuman Resources and Supervision 23
EDLP 250Education Research 13
Total Units68
1

Courses taken first semester

2

Courses taken second semester

3

Courses taken third semester

4

Courses taken fourth semester.

This is a three semester program but students will have the option of taking an additional (fourth) semester if needed.

Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential

A graduate student may earn a Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential (issued by CCTC) by completing the courses listed below. This credential prepares teachers for literacy related teaching positions pre K-12 as well as for leadership roles at school and district levels. Enrollment in the Master's program is not required provided that the following admission requirements are met.

Note: Teachers must have three years of teaching experience before the Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential can be awarded.

Specific Admission Requirements

Admission to the Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential requires:

  • a valid California Basic Teaching Credential (e.g., Multiple Subject or Single Subject Credential);
  • a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units;
  • successful completion of a basic course in the Teaching of Reading from an accredited university; if reading methods course is older than seven years, must show evidence of: a) current staff development in Language and Literacy by participation in workshops, institutes, etc., (candidates must show documentation); or b) passing the RICA test within the past seven years; and
  • completion of the Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential Application (available in Eureka Hall 203 and on the web at csus.edu/coe/.

Credential - Reading/Language Arts Specialist

Required Courses (24 Units)
Tier I (Take these courses first)
EDTE 200Practicum in Decoding and Fluency: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 201Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 203Teaching and Assessing Writing in the Pre-K through 12 Classroom3
EDTE 205Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction3
Tier II (Take these courses ONLY after completion of Tier I)
EDTE 202Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings3
EDTE 206Leadership In Literacy3
EDTE 207Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention3
EDTE 209Literature for the Diverse Pre- K through 12 Classroom: Issues, Models and Strategies3
Total Units24

Certificate Programs

Certificate of Competency - Educational Technology

Minimum required GPA: 3.0 for all courses in the certificate program. Applicants must complete an Enrollment Form for Certificate in Educational Technology available in Eureka Hall 203, or on the web at csus.edu/coe/.

A graduate student may earn a certificate in Educational Technology by completing four 3-unit courses. These courses provide the competencies needed by teachers and curriculum specialists to integrate technology into the curriculum, scaffold its inclusion in instruction, and disseminate that knowledge via appropriate staff-development needs.

The courses for this certificate are recognized by the CCTC as fulfilling the Supplementary Authorization for Computer Concepts and Applications, which is required by many districts for teaching computer-based courses or managing labs.

Enrollment in the master's program is not required provided prerequisites are met, including having a teaching credential or being enrolled in a credential program. candidates interested in seeking a master's degree should register in no more than 6 units prior to applying for classified standing in a MA program.

Prerequisites (3 Units)
A valid teaching credential OR enrollment in a credential program AND
EDTE 230Introduction to Computers in the Classroom3
Required Courses (12 Units)
Select one of the following options:12
Option 1
Educational Applications of Computers
Teaching Problem-Solving with Educational Technology
Curriculum and Staff Development with Educational Technology
Enhancing Curriculum with Multimedia and the Web
Option 2
Tools and the Curriculum 1
Staff Development and Presentation Applications 1
Problem Solving and Project Development 1
Technology and Modern Practices 1
Total Units12
1

Acceptance into the Master of Arts (Educational Technology).

Certificate of Competency - Mathematics Education

A graduate student may earn a Certificate in Mathematics Education by completing the following courses. Enrollment in the Master's program is not required provided that admission requirements are met, including having a teaching credential or being enrolled in a credential program.

Required Courses (12 Units)
EDTE 220Seminar in Mathematics Education3
EDTE 221Curriculum Development in Mathematics Education3
EDTE 222Teaching Mathematics in the Twenty-First Century3
EDTE 228Introduction to Ethnomathematics3
Total Units12

Certificate of Competency - Reading

A graduate student may earn a Reading Certificate (issued by CCTC) by completing the courses listed below. This certificate authorizes the holder to assess student reading and provide reading instruction in response to those assessments. Reading Certificate holders are also authorized to develop, implement, and adapt the reading content curriculum and assist classroom teachers in these areas. Holders of the Reading Certificate may perform the above services at one or more school sites at the grade levels authorized by their prerequisite teaching credential. Enrollment in the Master's program is not required provided that the following admission requirements are met.

Note: Teachers must have three years of teaching experience before the Reading Certificate can be awarded.

Specific Admission Requirements

Admission requires:

  • a valid California Basic Teaching Credential (e.g., Multiple Subject or Single Subject Credential);
  • a minimum 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 units attempted;
  • successful completion of a basic course in the Teaching of Reading from an accredited university; if reading methods course is older than seven years, must show evidence of:
  • current staff development in Language and Literacy by participation in workshops, institutes, etc., (Candidates must show documentation); or
  • passing the RICA test within the past seven years; and
  • completion of the Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential Application or Reading Certificate (available in Eureka Hall 203 and on the web at csus.edu/coe/.
Required Courses (12 Units)
EDTE 200Practicum in Decoding and Fluency: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 201Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 203Teaching and Assessing Writing in the Pre-K through 12 Classroom3
EDTE 205Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction3
Total Units12

Certificate of Competency - Teaching Reading to Adults

The Certificate in Teaching Reading to Adults (TRA Certificate) provides professional preparation and training in the theory and practice of teaching reading to adults. A combination of coursework in reading theory and pedagogy with teaching and/or tutoring experience provides the competencies and skills necessary to teach reading to adults. The program is designed for graduate candidates who expect to teach in community college or adult education settings.

Information on Eligibility

Candidates must either be in a graduate degree program at Sacramento State or must apply for graduate admission to the University. Once admitted to Sacramento State, prospective TRA Certificate candidates must apply to the Certificate Coordinator for admission to the program.

Candidates must take the Writing Placement for Graduate candidates (WPG) or take a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secure approval for a WPG waiver.

International candidates must have a TOEFL score of 600 or higher (or a score of 250 or higher on the computerized TOEFL) and a score of 5 on the Test of Written English.

Certificate Requirements

The reading certificate requires 15 units of coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Required Courses (15 Units)
EDTE 205Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction3
EDTE 207Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention3
ENGL 215AReading/Vocabulary Acquisition3
EDTE/ENGL 225CTheoretical Issues in Adult Literacies3
ENGL 410LInternship in Teaching Adult Reading3
Total Units15

For further information, contact the Certificate Coordinator, Calaveras Hall 138, (916) 278-6197.

Master of Arts in Education

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • two years of teaching experience or its functional equivalent;
  • a minimum 2.5 GPA in the last 60 units;
  • proficiency in written English composition as demonstrated by either passing the Sacramento State Writing Placement for Juniors exam or equivalent, or enrolling in ENGL 109W [passing with a grade of C or better; and
  • an interview with a student/practicing administrator/faculty team; interviews will be scheduled at the close of the application period, (the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test scores are NOT required; however, these test scores may be included with the admission application).

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Admission Procedures

Prospective graduate students, including Sacramento State graduates, must file the following with the Office of Graduate Studies, Riverfront Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission; and
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/.

At the same time, each applicant must forward the following to the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department in the College of Education:

  • the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies application for admission (available in Eureka Hall 437);
  • two letters of reference (forms attached to application packet); and
  • one set of transcripts, including Sacramento State (these need not be official).

Approximately two weeks after the deadline for submission of application materials to the Department, each applicant will be scheduled for an interview. Approximately two weeks after all applicants have been interviewed, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to each applicant.

Master of Arts in Education - Educational Leadership

Admission Requirements:

Admission as a classified graduate student in P-12 School Leadership requires:

  • Completion of a baccalaureate degree at the time of application
  • GPA in the last 60 units of 2.5 or better
  • Completion, and successful review, of CSU Mentor and program Supplemental application
  • Successful interview with faculty, demonstrating
  • Preparation for graduate level study
  • Some leadership experience
  • Familiarity with current issues in education
  • Knowledge of conflict resolution and negotiation skills
  • Knowledge of P-12 education as a field
  • Entry level understanding of ethical leadership
  • Vision for P-12 education

Admission as a classified graduate student in Higher Education Leadership requires:

  • Completion of a baccalaureate degree at the time of application
  • GPA in the last 60 units of 2.5 or better
  • Completion, and successful review, of CSU Mentor and program Supplemental application
  • Successful interview with faculty, demonstrating
  • Preparation for graduate level study
  • Professional experience at any level in higher education
  • Some leadership experience
  • Familiarity with current issues in education
  • Knowledge of conflict resolution and negotiation skills
  • Knowledge of higher education as a field
  • Entry level understanding of ethical leadership
  • Vision for P-16 education

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student working toward a Master's degree must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy for the degree; the application is a form on which the student indicates a proposed program of graduate study. The student must be advanced to candidacy the semester prior to enrolling in EDLP 500A. The procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units in the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies graduate program with a minimum 3.0 GPA;
  • obtained advisor's preliminary approval of thesis or project proposal; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Advancement to candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies or the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department Office. The student fills out the form after planning a degree program in consultation with his/her Educational Leadership faculty advisor. The completed form is returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

Units required for the MA: 30, including at least 21 units in approved Educational Leadership courses. Up to six units, including extension credit, can be transferred from another university; a minimum of 21 units must be taken in residence.

Minimum required GPA: 3.0 for all work presented for the degree; only units with a grade ''C'' or better may be counted. All work must be completed within a 7-year period.

Graduate Core Requirements (27 Units)
EDLP 200ADiversity and Equity in Educational Leadership3
EDLP 201AFoundations of Educational Leadership3
EDLP 202ALegal Basis of Education3
EDLP 203AFinancial Resources Planning and Allocation3
EDLP 205ACurriculum and Instructional Leadership in K-12 Schools3
EDLP 206ASupervision and Leadership3
EDLP 208ASchool Leadership/Management3
EDLP 209AHuman Resources and Supervision3
EDLP 250Education Research3
Culminating Requirement 16
Option 1
Master of Arts Thesis/Project Seminar
Master of Arts Thesis/Project
Option 2
Master of Arts Thesis/Project
Master of Arts Thesis/Project
Total Units33
1

Thesis/Projects. Students must file a Master's Thesis/Project Petition in the Department office one semester in advance and must have advanced to candidacy the semester prior to enrolling in thesis/project. EDLP 500A and EDLP 230 can not be taken in the same semester unless approved by the student's advisor and Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair. EDLP 500A and EDLP 500B can not be taken in the same semester unless approved by the student's advisor and Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair. Students needing additional time may enroll in subsequent semesters in EDLP 299T with approval of their advisor and Department Chair.

Notes:

  • In order to be assured that faculty thesis/project advisors will be available, students must file the thesis/project petition with proposal in the Department office in advance of the semester of enrollment in EDLP 500A, EDLP 500B or EDLP 299T.
  • This graduate degree program is subject to general University and Departmental requirements. These requirements are explained in the ''Graduate Studies'' and the ''Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department'' sections of this catalog.

Master of Arts in Education - Higher Education Leadership

Units required for the MA: 30, including at least 21 units in approved Educational Leadership courses. Up to 6 units, including extension credit, can be transferred from another university; a minimum of 21 units must be taken in residence.

Minimum required GPA: 3.0 for all work presented for the degree; no units with a grade lower than a ''C'' may be counted. All work must be completed within a 7-year period.

Graduate Core Requirements (24 Units)
EDLP 221Foundations in Higher Education Leadership 13
EDLP 222Diversity in Higher Education 13
EDLP 250Education Research3
EDLP 224Advanced Seminar: Program Development and Evaluation 13
EDLP 225Advanced Seminar: Ethical Decision Making 13
EDLP 226Meeting the Leadership Challenge3
EDLP 227Leading the Way for Student Success: Student and Instructional Services3
EDLP 228Innovative Leadership for Troubled Times: Budget/Finance and Human Resources3
Culminating Requirement (6 Units)
EDLP 500AMaster of Arts Thesis/Project3
EDLP 500BMaster of Arts Thesis/Project3
Total Units30
1

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.

Notes:

  • Thesis/Projects: Students must file a petition in the Department office one semester in advance and must have advanced to candidacy before they enroll in thesis/project. First semester students are to register for EDLP 500A and EDLP 500B during the second semester if they obtained a satisfactory grade in EDLP 500A. Students needing additional time may enroll in subsequent semesters in EDLP 299T with approval of their advisor and Department Chair.
  • The Master of Arts in Education, Higher Education Leadership Option consists of the following tracks: Student Affairs Leadership and Community College Leadership.

Master of Arts in Education - Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies

Units required for the MA: 30
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than "C" may apply toward the degree.

The Master of Arts in Education with the Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies, offers

  1. the opportunity to take courses that focus on the role of women from the points of view of the various disciplines from other University departments;
  2. the opportunity to take courses that focus on the educational needs of ethnic and older women;
  3. the opportunity to focus on the developmental needs of the young for a nonsexist education; and
  4. the possibility for internships with state and local governments and school districts.

The program offers an emphasis on women as agents of social change and flexible course selection to emphasize research interests in women's issues.

General Admission Requirements

All graduate degree programs in Teaching Credentials require a baccalaureate degree.

The following general requirements and procedures apply to all MA in Education programs except as noted in specific additional requirements listed with individual degree options below.

A list of M.A. Program Coordinators is on the web at csus.edu/coe/ . Please contact the appropriate M.A. Program Coordinator for additional information.

General Admission Procedures

On a space available basis students may be admitted after the deadline to the following programs: uncohorted Curriculum and Instruction, Gender Equity Studies, and Language and Literacy. Please contact the appropriate program coordinator.

All prospective graduate students, including Sacramento State graduates, must file the following with the Sacramento State Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for graduate admission; and
  • two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For a more admissions and application deadlines, please email coe-grad@csus.edu

Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be mailed to the applicant.

Specific Additional Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements/Procedures for MA in Education apply, plus:

  • a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted;
  • an approved statement of purpose that addresses:
    1. why the applicant wants to enter this particular program;
    2. career objectives which will coincide with program goals;
  • evidence of completion of a previous course(s) with "B" or better grade (graduate or undergraduate level) which focuses on the area of Women's Studies and/or Gender Studies; and
  • an oral interview.

General Advancement to Candidacy Procedures

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of graduate study. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission;
  • completed at least 12 units of courses in the graduate program (see Degree Requirements) with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available online through the Office of Graduate Studies website: csus.edu/gradstudies/forms/index.html. The student fills out the form after planning a degree program in consultation with the appropriate M.A. Program Coordinator. The form must be submitted to the Teacher Education Department Office and the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

Approved Master's Thesis/Project Format: American Psychological Association (APA) - Latest edition. Before beginning a 500-level course to complete a Project, Action Research, or Thesis, students are required to have an approved Culminating Experience Proposal on file in the Department office. The reservation form for a Culminating Experience Chair for fall semester is due March 10; for spring the form is due October 15. Note: A completed Proposal requires the approval of the Culminating Experience Chair as well as Human Subjects approval. The proposal and accompanying Protection of Human Subject forms must be reviewed by the EDTE Graduate Coordinator and the Department or University Human Subjects Review Committee.

Enrollment in the 500 series Culminating Experience is for one semester. The expectation is that students will complete the thesis/project during the 500-level course.  One semester of continuous enrollment is allowed if the Culminating Experience Chair deems a reasonable amount of progress has been made as per the timeline in the Proposal and assigns a grade of "RP" for the 500 series. If students fail to make adequate progress according to their Proposal timeline and there are no mitigating circumstances (e.g., illness), a grade of "no credit" is given, and the student must re-enroll in the appropriate 500 series Culminating Experience.

Note: The Department of Teacher Education requires each student download the Department of Teacher Education Graduate Student Handbook, available on the Department website at www.csus.edu/coe/academics/credentials/handbooks/index.html.

Required Courses (15 Units)
EDUC 165Sex Role Stereotyping in American Education 3
EDTE 250Education Research3
EDTE 251Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society3
EDTE 266Women And Education3
EDTE 290Seminar: Preparation of Master's Thesis/Project3
Electives (12 Units)
Select 12 units of electives 112
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
EDTE 506Culminating Experience: Behavioral Sciences - Women's Studies 23
Total Units30
1

Select 12 units of elective courses in consultation with the Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies Program Coordinator. The units must be selected from: Gender Equity core courses; Women's Studies cross-listed courses; or other courses specifically approved by the Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies Program Coordinator. At least six of the elective units must be at the 200-level.

2

Credit is given upon completion of a thesis, project, or other approved culminating experience. For the Master of Arts in Education (Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies). Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and has secured the permission of his/her Culminating Experience Chair and the Behavioral Sciences Gender Equity Studies Program Coordinator. All forms may be obtained on the web at csus.edu/coe/.

Master of Arts in Education - Curriculum and Instruction

Units required for the MA: 30 units
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than "C" may apply toward the degree.

The Master of Arts in Education, Curriculum and Instruction is designed to provide professional and specialized preparation for the candidate interested in acquiring knowledge and skills essential for the design and development of curriculum and related instructional practices. The program provides a variety of options for candidates to develop and enhance expertise in a particular field of interest such as educational technology, mathematics education, language and literacy, and other specializations related to elementary, middle school, and secondary education.

There is also an online option for the Master of Arts in Education. The program meets 25% face-to-face and 75% online. During the face-to-face sessions, students will be part of experiences that will emphasize community development, which will allow participants to get to know their peers and instructors and allow them to learn the online tools that will be used for instructional delivery. For information on the Master of Arts in Education, Curriculum and Instruction, contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Specific Additional Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements/Procedures for MA in Education apply, plus:

  • a valid teaching credential or Curriculum and Instruction Program Coordinator and Department approval for waiving this requirement; and
  • a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Note: The Department of Teacher Education requires each student download the Department of Teacher Education Graduate Student Handbook, available on the Department website at www.csus.edu/coe/academics/credentials/handbooks/index.html.

Required Courses (15 Units)
EDTE 226Seminar: Strategies for Teachers3
EDTE 227Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction, K-123
EDTE 250Education Research3
EDTE 251Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society3
EDTE 290Seminar: Preparation of Master's Thesis/Project3
Other Course Requirements (12 Units)
Select 12 units of electives 112
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
EDTE 505Culminating Experience: Curriculum and Instruction 23
Total Units30
1

Twelve elective units in Curriculum and Instruction coursework are to be selected by the student in consultation with the Curriculum and Instruction Program Coordinator. Students may focus their elective units in a program of their interest or select courses from various programs. At least three of the elective units must be at the 200 level. Examples of Curriculum and Instruction elective programs include: Educational Technology, Mathematics Education, Language and Literacy, and Gender Equity.

Some elective areas, such as Arts in Education and National Board Certification, are offered in cohort groups. These cohorts are started as resources allow. Information regarding planned cohorts is available in the Department office, Eureka Hall 203, (916) 278-6155.

With C & I Program Coordinator approval, program courses may include one of the following:

  • 6 transfer elective units
  • 6 units of extension credit
2

Credit is given upon completion of a thesis, project, or other approved culminating experience for the Master of Arts in Education (Curriculum and Instruction). Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and has secured the permission of his/her Culminating Experience Chair and the Curriculum and Instruction Program Coordinator. All forms may be obtained in the Department office, the Department of Teacher Education Graduate Student Manual, and on the web at www.csus.edu/coe/academics/credentials/handbooks/index.html.

Master of Arts in Education - Educational Technology

Units required for the MA: 30
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than "C" may apply toward the degree.

This program uses a combination of face-to-face and online meetings. It is a rigorous 18-24 month program focusing on technical, curricular, and leadership skills. Instruction is centered on the learner and on what is required of educators in today's technologically-rich learning environment. Coursework is project-oriented, utilizing innovative electronic portfolios focusing on reflective learning practices and review by peers and colleagues. The Master of Arts in Education, Educational Technology encompasses a wide variety of academic, technical, and practical exposures, certifying that holders of the degree are highly competent teaching strategists, leaders, and presenters. Participants in the program not only learn to integrate relevant teaching strategies with current technologies, but are expected to develop new procedures that augment learning through the use of technology. Students focus on developing multimedia and web-based delivery skills as a means for teaching and learning, as well as on building a practical understanding of hardware, software and network applications. This program is offered only in cohort groups. Check with the Department (imet.csus.edu or (916) 278-6155) for the next start date.

Effective Fall 2006 there is a Distance Learning Technology Fee of $40 per unit to be paid by the end of the third week of instruction of each term of enrollment in the Educational Technology program. Failure to pay this fee will result in students being dropped from their classes for the term.

Specific Additional Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements/Procedures for MA in Education apply, plus:

  • a minimum 3.0 overall GPA in the last 60 units attempted;
  • a valid teaching credential or Educational Technology Program Coordinator and Department approval for waiving this requirement;
  • an approved statement of purpose that addresses:
    1. why the applicant wants to enter this particular program;
    2. career objectives which will coincide with program goals; and
  • applicants must be proficient in using the Internet for e-mail, downloads, and web searches. Applicants must have demonstrated successful use of computer technology within the classroom and must be familiar with installing software, navigating through a hard drive, choosing printers, and logging on to a network.

Note: The Department of Teacher Education requires each student download the Department of Teacher Education Graduate Student Handbook, available on the Department website at www.csus.edu/coe/academics/credentials/handbooks/index.html.

Required Courses (27 Units)
EDTE 250IEducational Research for IMET 13
EDTE 251IEducation for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society for IMET 13
EDTE 280Fundamentals of Online Pedagogy 23
EDTE 281Tools and the Curriculum 23
EDTE 282Strategies for Application and Presentation 23
EDTE 283Staff Development and Presentation Applications 23
EDTE 284Problem Solving and Project Development 23
EDTE 285Technology and Modern Practices 23
EDTE 286Special Topics in Educational Technology 23
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
EDTE 507Culminating Experience: Educational Technology 33
Total Units30
1

These courses must be taken as part of the Educational Technology cohort. The Educational Technology coursework is integrated into these courses.

2

Requires acceptance into Master of Arts (Educational Technology); not open to students who have not been admitted to the program:

3

Credit is given upon completion of a thesis, project or other approved culminating experience for the Master of Arts in Education (Educational Technology). Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and has secured the permission of the Educational Technology Program Coordinator

Master of Arts in Education - Language and Literacy Option

Units required for the MA: 30
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than ''C'' may apply toward the degree.

The Master of Arts in Education, Language and Literacy is designed for the administrator, the classroom teacher, and the specialist teacher of language and literacy for all types of children, youth, and adults. The program includes required courses in Professional Education and selected courses in language and literacy.

Specific Additional Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in Education, Language and Literacy, requires:

  • a valid Teaching Credential or advisor or Department approval for waiving this requirement;
  • a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted; and
  • successful completion of a basic course in the Teaching of Reading from an accredited university; if reading methods course is older than seven years, the applicant must show evidence of either a) current staff development in Language and Literacy by participation in workshops, institutes, etc., (candidates must show documentation); or b) passing the RICA test within the past seven years.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Note: The Department of Teacher Education requires each student download the Department of Teacher Education Graduate Student Handbook, available on the Department website at www.csus.edu/coe/academics/credentials/handbooks/index.html.

Reading/Language Arts Specialist Credential Emphasis

Required Courses (24 Units)
Tier I (Take these courses first)
EDTE 200Practicum in Decoding and Fluency: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 201Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 203Teaching and Assessing Writing in the Pre-K through 12 Classroom3
EDTE 205Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction3
Tier II (Take these courses ONLY after you have completed Tier I)
EDTE 202Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings3
EDTE 206Leadership In Literacy3
EDTE 207Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention3
EDTE 209Literature for the Diverse Pre- K through 12 Classroom: Issues, Models and Strategies3
Other Required Course (3 Units)
EDTE 250Education Research3
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
EDTE 503Culminating Experience: Language and Literacy3
Total Units30

Adult Reading Certificate Emphasis

Required Courses (24 Units)
Tier I (Take these courses first)
ENGL 215AReading/Vocabulary Acquisition3
EDTE 201Practicum in Comprehension: Assessment and Instruction3
EDTE 203Teaching and Assessing Writing in the Pre-K through 12 Classroom3
EDTE 205Psychology and Sociology of Literacy Instruction3
Tier II (Take these courses ONLY after you have completed Tier I)
EDTE 202Language and Literacy Development in Multicultural Settings3
EDTE 207Advanced Practicum in Reading Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention3
EDTE 225CTheoretical Issues in Adult Literacies3
ENGL 410LInternship in Teaching Adult Reading3
Other Required Course (3 Units)
EDTE 250Education Research3
Culminating Requirement (3 Units)
EDTE 503Culminating Experience: Language and Literacy 13
Total Units30
1

Credit is given upon completion of a thesis, project, or other approved culminating experience for the Master of Arts in Education (Language and Literacy). Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and has secured the permission of his/her Culminating Experience Chair and the Language and Literacy Program Coordinator. All forms may be obtained on the web at csus.edu/coe/.

Master of Arts in Education - Multicultural Education

The Multicultural Education graduate program explores theoretical and pedagogical issues of bilingualism, multiculturalism, educational equity, and social justice, offering courses and experiences to assist educators to work successfully in classrooms, schools, and educational agencies within our diverse State. The curriculum develops student's pedagogical, analytical, and planning skills in order to prepare them to operate effectively in the development, implementation and analysis of educational policies and programs affecting the academic lives of low income, and culturally and linguistically diverse K-12 student

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in Bilingual/Multicultural Education graduate program requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum 2.5 GPA in the last 60 units;
  • proficiency in written English composition as demonstrated either by passing the Sacramento State Writing Proficiency for Juniors exam or equivalent, or enrolling in ENGL 109W until the WPJ is passed;
  • completion and successful review of Department application;
  • successful interview with a faculty team. Interviews are scheduled within one month of the due date for submitting completed department applications.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Students will be notified of any deficiencies through written communication.

The Department does not accept units earned through Open University and they will not be credited towards either option of the Master's degree.

Admission Procedures

All MA cohorts begin in fall semester. Applicants must complete a university application by the posted application deadline date for the term applying:

  • an online application for graduate admission; and
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/.

At the same time, each applicant must complete the following procedures with the Graduate and Professional Studies in Education by the same due dates noted above:

  • complete and submit a Program application (available at Eureka Hall 401) and
  • participate in an oral interview (applicants schedule interview upon submitting their Program application). Interviews are scheduled within one month after the Program and Office of Graduate Studies applications are due.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of study for the MA. The student must be advanced to candidacy prior to enrolling in EDBM 565. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units of courses in the graduate program (see Degree Requirements) with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies or the Department office. The student will complete the form after planning a degree program in consultation with the Department Graduate Coordinator. The form must be submitted to the Bilingual/Multicultural Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

Thesis/Project Registration

Check with the Bilingual/Multicultural Graduate Coordinator for the policies regarding Report in Progress ("RP") grades and continuous enrollment. The culminating experience for the MA may be a thesis, project, or exam.

A 3-unit course is required when doing the thesis/project. Enrollment in the culminating experience may occur only after Advancement to Candidacy.

The Thesis/Project course requires the student to file and have an approved Thesis/Project Petition form and Advisor Reservation form on record with the BMED Graduate Coordinator at least one full semester in advance of registration. Both forms are due by April 1st for fall enrollment and by November 1st for spring enrollment. Failure to meet these deadlines will result in the inability to enroll in the Thesis/Project course for the desired semester.

The Thesis/Project Petition and reservation forms must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator at least one month prior to the submission due date (i.e., March or October); the forms will then be forwarded to the Graduate Committee for review and recommendations.

Students may enroll in the Thesis/Project course a maximum of two semesters for credit. Students must submit the Reservation Form only to continue in the Thesis/Project course for the second semester. Failure to do so will result in inability to work with the Thesis/Project advisor for the desired semester.

Approved Master's Thesis/Project Format: American Psychological Association (APA) - Latest Edition.

Requirements – Master of Arts in Education - Multicultural Education

The Master of Arts in Education - Multicultural Education requires completion of 30 units of approved coursework with a minimum 3.0 GPA. A minimum of 18 units of approved 200 series offerings must be earned, not including EDBM 299. A minimum of 24 units in 100, 200, and 500 series offerings must be earned in residence at Sacramento State. The Department does not accept units earned through Open University, and they will not be credited towards the MA. All work must be completed within a 7-year period. An outline of degree requirements for the MA follows:

Required Core Courses (12 Units)12
EDBM 205Education for a Democratic, Pluralistic Society3
EDBM 220Multicultural Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment3
EDGR 260Writing and Research Across the Disciplines3
EDUC 170Bilingual Education: Introduction to Educating English Learners3
Additional Course Requirements (9 Units)
EDBM 235Research Seminar on Bilingualism and Language Varieties in Education3
EDBM 245Advocacy, Change and Community3
EDBM 250Education Research3
Electives (3-6 Units)
Select 3-6 units of the following: 13 - 6
Foundational Issues for a Multicultural, Pluralistic Society, B
Foundations for Multicultural Secondary Education, B
Methods for Teaching Second Language Learners, Multiple Subject (ELD and SDAIE)
Special Problems Educational Leadership
Culminating Experience or Comprehensive Exam MA Exam (3-6 Units) 2
Select 3-6 units of the following:3 - 6
Thesis/Project Writing
MA Thesis/Project
Total Units30-33
1

 Note: Additional electives are selected by the candidate and his/her MA advisor

2

 Comprehensive exam students = 24 total units (will need 6 units of electives)

Thesis/project students = 27 total units (will need 3 units of electives)

Master of Arts in Education - Special Education

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in the Master of Arts in Education, Special Education option, requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum 3.0 overall GPA in the last 60-semester units of college coursework (excluding “P” or “CR” grades); and
  • already admitted to one of the Education Specialist Credential programs at California State University, Sacramento OR already hold an Education Specialist Credential.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Admission Procedures

Persons interested in special education programs should first contact a faculty advisor in the appropriate area of interest.

All students, including Sacramento State graduates, must file the following with the Sacramento State Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission and
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit csus.edu/gradstudies/.

At the same time, each applicant must send the following to the Graduate and Professional Studies in Education in Eureka Hall 401:

  • a supplemental program application;
  • written statement of professional goals, approximately 500 words;
  • two letters of recommendation and/or Evaluator Rating forms; and
  • one set of transcripts, including Sacramento State (unofficial OK).

If students are to graduate under the provision of this catalog, they must maintain continuous enrollment from the date of classification to the date of graduation. Students who are planning to be absent for more than one semester must file a Leave of Absence request and have it approved prior to the absence.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts in Education (Special Education) requires completion of 30 units and:

  • A cumulative 3.0 GPA or higher in all coursework;
  • No single course in which the student receives a grade below "B-" will be counted as credit toward the degree unless the student has petitioned for acceptance of the course, and the petition has been accepted and approved by the Special Education faculty;
  • no more than six units transferable from another university;
  • no more than six units through Special Problems;
  • no more than six units of pre-M.A. 200-level coursework;
  • Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) exam to fulfill Graduate Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR)

The following are not acceptable for MA credit:

  • 300- or -400 level courses;
  • student teaching courses; and
  • extension courses not recognized by the college-of-record issuing degrees.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students working toward a Master's degree must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy, indicating a proposed program of study. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • been assigned an advisor;
  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed 15 units of content knowledge elective units with a minimum 3.0 GPA;
  • completed student teaching/internship requirements; and
  • satisfied the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) requirement within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento. Students may satisfy this requirement via a WPG waiver (see Office of Graduate Studies website for waiver requirements). If students do not satisfy this requirement via a WPG waiver, students must do the following:
    •  Take the WPG Exam
      • If WPG Exam is passed, WPG requirement is satisfied;
      • If WPG Exam not passed, WPG requirement not satisfied, and student must:
        • Take EDGR 260 (Graduate Writing Intensive Course GWI) if offered, and pass with a grade of “B” or better;
        • Take ENGL 220W (offered through the College of Continuing Education) and pass with a grade of “B” or better; or
        • Take GRE/GMAT and score 4.5 or higher on the Analytical Writing portion and submit a waiver to the Office of Graduate Studies.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Department office and the Office of Graduate Studies (OGS). The student fills out the form after planning a degree program in consultation with a faculty advisor and approved by the Graduate Coordinator. The completed form is then returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval. Please note deadline dates posted by the Office of Graduate Studies for submission of this form.

Prior to graduation, an application for graduation must be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies by the deadline and all coursework leading to this Master's degree (as well as to special education credentials) must be completed within a seven year period. Please note deadline dates posted by the Office of Graduate Studies for submission of this form.

Requirements – Master of Arts in Education - Special Education

Required Core Courses9
EDSP 250Education Research3
EDSP 251Education in a Democratic, Pluralistic Society3
EDSP 297Current Issues in Special Education3
Other Content Knowledge Elective Requirements (15 Units)15
Content Knowledge elective units can be selected from the following in consultation with advisor:
Methods in Access and Inclusion in the Core Curriculum: Mod/Severe Disabilities
Collaborative Program Planning with Families, Professionals, and Communities
Secondary/Post-Secondary Methods and Transition Planning: Moderate/Severe Disabilities
Evidenced-based Assessment and Instruction: Mod/Severe Disabilities
Developing Augmentative Alternative Communication Systems: Assessment and Intervention
Educational Implications of Physical Sensory Disabilities and Specialized Health Care Needs
Instructional Strategies: Low Incidence Disabilities
Language and Literacy in Inclusive Classrooms I
Language and Literacy in Inclusive Classrooms II
Assessment and Evaluation for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Assessment and Evaluation for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities Lab
Curriculum and Instruction Strategies for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Positive Behavior Supports for Students with Mild, Moderate, and Severe Behavioral Challenges
Effective Communication and Collaborative Partnerships
Field Seminar in Program and Instruction: Mod/Severe Disabilities
Transition Strategies for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Teaching English Learners with Disabilities
Education of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Education of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders - Lab
Other courses in supporting fields may also be selected if approved by advisor.
Culminating Requirements (6 Units) 16
Select one of the following:
Thesis or Project
Seminar for Culminating Experiences
Master of Arts Thesis: Special Education
Master of Arts Project: Special Education
Exam
Seminar for Culminating Experiences
Master's Seminar in Special Education
Total Units30
1

Thesis/Project/MA Seminar (EDSP 500/EDSP 501/EDSP 298) courses require the student to file and have approved a Reservation Form for that course the semester before intended registration. Enrollment in culminating experience (Thesis/Project/MA Seminar) may occur only after advancement to candidacy. Students seeking continuous enrollment must have advisor and graduate coordinator’s approval.

Students choosing the thesis or project option must enroll for three units of EDSP 500 or EDSP 501 in one semester. The expectation is that students will complete the thesis or  project during the 500-level course. If students fail to make adequate progress according to their proposal timeline and there are no mitigating circumstances (e.g., illness), an “NC” grade will be given and the student must re-enroll in the appropriate 500 series course.

The graduate degree program is subject to general University and Departmental requirements. These requirements are explained in the Graduate Degree Requirements section of the University Catalog.

Career and Technical Studies

This program is designed to provide training for adults who wish to train/teach in a career technical/business program in public institutions or private business settings. The Bachelor's degree includes the Designated Subjects Teaching Credential in Career Technical Education or Adult Education and the Supervision and Coordination Credential. The program is offered on weekends and uses instructional techniques suited to adult learners.

This program is offered through the College of Continuing Education while its academic home is in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, School Psychology, and Deaf Studies in the College of Education. It is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC), the California State University Chancellor's Office, and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

Eligibility

The CTS degree program requires that students have five to seven years of career technical/business experience in a designated field prior to graduation. Degree candidates receive up to 30 elective units for prior job experience, teaching/training experience, supervisory experience, and current professional development and education. In addition, candidates complete general education and graduation requirements for Sacramento State and the Career and Technical Studies Major.

Career Possibilities

Teacher in regional occupation programs, private post-secondary institutions, community colleges, correctional facilities and adult schools · Trainers and facilitators in public or private industry · School and career counselors · Human resource recruiters and placement personnel · Mediators and labor relations specialists · Educational administrators · School-to-work coordinators · Learning specialists · Administrators, managers and supervisors in public or private industry · Small business owners and entrepreneurs · Consultants in business, industry, and education

Contact Information

Maria Mejorado, BSCTS Faculty Coordinator
College of Education
Eureka Hall 406
(916) 278-3496

Jackie Jang, Program Coordinator
College of Continuing Education
Napa Hall
(916) 278-4813

Nicole Baptista, Program Advisor
College of Continuing Education
Napa Hall
(916) 278-6007

Karen Davis-O’Hara, Chair, Undergraduate Programs
College of Education
Eureka Hall
(916) 278-6639

Jill Matsueda, Senior Program Manager
College of Continuing Education
Napa Hall
(916) 278-4930

Graduate Program

The advanced option in Workforce Development Advocacy is designed to complement the existing Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Studies [CTS] degree. The new option would be offered as a component of the Master of Arts degree program in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, School Psychology, and Deaf Studies but delivered through the College of Continuing Education using a similar scheduling format as the CTS program (an intensive weekend schedule to which employers as well as CTS graduates have adapted).

Master of Arts in Education - Workforce Development Advocacy

Units Required: 30

Core Requirements (9 Units)
EDS 228Sem:Future Workforce Dev3
EDSP 250Education Research3
EDSP 251Education in a Democratic, Pluralistic Society3
Culminating Requirement (6 Units)
EDS 530Project In WDA I2
EDS 531Project In WDA II4
Concentration Requirements (15 Units)
EDS 222Perspectives Workforce Dev3
EDS 223Organization Learning Comm3
EDS 224WF Assess+Accountability3
EDS 226Resource Enhance For WDA3
EDS 227Issues Impacting WDA3
Total Units30

Master of Arts Degree in Education - School Psychology

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in the Master of Arts in Education, School Psychology option, requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum 3.0 overall grade point average (if GPA is below 3.0, student may be accepted conditionally);
  • successfully meeting the University Graduate Writing Assessment Requirements (GWAR);
  • evidence of registration for or CBEST passing score; and the following courses or equivalents (contact a school psychology advisor for more information on equivalent experiences):
Select an Introductory Statistics course3
EDUC 155Introduction to Counseling3
EDUC 156Power, Privilege and Self Identity in Counseling3
EDUC 100A
EDUC 100B
Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings
Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings Lab 1
3
EDUC 125A
EDUC 125B
Tutoring Children in Reading
Tutoring Children in Reading Practicum
3
1

 EDUC 100A and EDUC 100B must be taken concurrently

One year of experience as a teacher or two years of experience as a teacher's aide. Experience with pupils in a variety of setting may be used as an equivalency (contact a school psychology advisor for more information on equivalent experiences)

PSYC 117Drugs and Behavior3
PSYC 168Abnormal Psychology3

In addition, candidates concurrently pursuing the Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Psychology Endorsement, must pass the CBEST.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Admission Procedures

All students must file the following with the Sacramento State Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission; and
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit csus.edu/gradstudies/.

At the same time, each applicant must complete a separate application for admission to the School Psychology Program:

  • the program's application is available online at csus.edu/psyc/grad-students/application%20materials;
  • three letters of reference (forms attached to application);
  • one set of transcripts;
  • evidence of experience in public schools; and
  • evidence of strong communication skills.

Department applications are due by March 1 for admission the following Fall Semester. Applications are only accepted and processed once per year, during spring semester for admission the following fall.

School Psychology Option

The Master of Arts in Education (School Psychology) offers the opportunity to gain skills in working with preschool through grade 12 students, teachers, and parents in the school setting. Graduates of this degree who also complete practicum and fieldwork requirements are eligible for the Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Psychology Endorsement, offered by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC). Possession of the MA in Education (School Psychology) and the Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Psychology Endorsement prepares an individual to meet the academic requirements for the Licensed Educational Psychologist (LEP) license administered by the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners, Department of Consumer Affairs.

The program includes training in counseling techniques, the use of individual academic and psychological assessment tools, the introduction of behavioral interventions in the school and the home, consultation skills, techniques of program development and evaluation, special education law, and instructional strategies.

Unique strengths of the program include supervised training in a clinic setting, early field experience in schools, a one-year field placement in the public schools, and instruction by faculty who hold school psychology credentials.

The program also offers a CCTC approved internship in school psychology. Interns are jointly selected by program faculty and employing districts. Students are not eligible for the CCTC internship option until they are ready to register for EDS 441A, usually in the fifth semester of the program. A minimum 1200-hour internship, completed in not more than four semesters, is required and must be approved by their advisor.

The program also offers an advanced degree, Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) in School Psychology. This degree requires a total of 95 units of coursework and completion of a culminating experience.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts in Education (School Psychology) requires completion of 46-51 units of coursework with a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. No single course in which a student receives a grade below "B-" will be counted as credit toward the degree unless the student has petitioned for acceptance of the course, and the petition has been accepted and approved by the School Psychology faculty. A minimum of 21 of these units must be taken in residence at Sacramento State. Use of extension courses must be approved by the advisor. Enrollment in Special Problems will only be granted under exceptional circumstances. An outline of degree requirements follows:

Plan of Study Grid
First SemesterUnits
EDC 210 Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling 3
EDS 231 Group Process in School Psychology 3
EDS 245 Psychology In The Schools 3
EDS 248 Human Development and Learning 3
EDGR 260 Writing and Research Across the Disciplines 3
 Units15
Second Semester
EDS 241 Counseling and Psychotherapy for School Psychologists 3
EDS 242A Cognitive Assessment 3
EDSP 250 Education Research 3
EDS 440 Practicum in Individual Counseling/School Psychology 3
 Units12
Third Semester
EDS 240 Functional Assessment of Behavior 3
EDS 244 Social, Emotional and Behavioral Assessment 3
EDS 246A Preventive Academic Interventions 3
 Units9
Fourth Semester
EDS 246B Preventive Mental Health Interventions 3
EDS 247 Assessment of Special Needs 3
EDS 249
Special Seminar: School Psychology
or Master's Project: Education/School Psychology (Plan B)
1 - 6
Teacher Education: Elective from list of electives 3
 Units10-15
 Total Units46-51

The MA Seminar EDS 249 and EDS 541 courses require students to file and have approved a Reservation Form for the courses the semester before intended registration. Registration for Special Problems (DEAF 199/EDS 299) requires a Special Problems petition be filed the semester before intended registration. Enrollment in the culminating experience (Thesis/Project/MA Seminar) may occur only after advancement to candidacy.

Please be aware that this Department requires the guidelines in the American Psychological Association (APA), most current edition, for formatting of projects/theses. The Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470, also publishes a two-sided form, Thesis/Project Format Requirements, to refer to for the preparation and submission of the Master's Thesis or Project. You can find this form and other Graduate Studies forms on the web at csus.edu/gradstudies/forms.

Prior to graduation, an application for graduation must be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies by the deadline date. In addition, all coursework leading to this Master's degree must be completed within a seven year period.

Credential Requirements

The Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Psychology Endorsement, requires the program outlined for the MA in Education (School Psychology), plus the following:

If students are to graduate under the provision of this catalog, they must maintain continuous enrollment from the date of classification to the date of graduation. Students who are planning to be absent for more than one semester must file a Leave of Absence request and have it approved prior to the absence.

Master of Arts in Child Development

The Master of Arts in Child Development program offers an opportunity for the advanced study of developmental theory and research in preparation for a wide range of professional objectives. The program emphasizes scholarly reflection on developmental issues, and academic excellence in oral and written communication. Program faculty value academic scholarship and research, and regard their application in professional settings as central to the mission of the MA program. Graduates of the program are expected to be well educated, lifelong learners, with excellent preparation in research, theory and practice in diverse, multicultural settings.

The MA program prepares graduates for professional employment in a variety of settings, including working directly with infants, children and their families, teaching at the community college level, and preparing for additional study toward a doctoral degree in child development or a related field. The program incorporates the following areas of study: developmental research and theory; cognitive, linguistic and social, and emotional development of children; social, and cultural and familial influences on development; children with behavioral, emotional, cognitive, and academic special needs and their families; programming and curricula development; principles and practices involved in organizing, administering, and evaluating child development programs.

For further information please see the Academic Program Services Office, Eureka Hall 401, or check the College of Education Web site at http://www.csus.edu/coe/academics/graduate/

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in the Master of Arts in Child Development requires:

  • a BA in Child/Human Development or a closely related field, Some applicants may be admitted with the condition that certain prerequisite courses be completed before beginning the requirements for the MA CHDV program;
  • minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units completed;
  • experience in programs serving children from infancy through primary grades; and
  • strong writing and communication skills.

Opportunity exists for conditional classification of applicants with an undergraduate major and experiences different from those listed above. This requires that students demonstrate convincingly that they are competent to pursue the degree.

Admission Procedures

All prospective graduate students, including Sacramento State graduates, must file a University application and a separate supplemental MA CHDV program application. Both applications must be submitted by the deadlines stated on the College of Education and Office of Graduate Studies web sites. Required application materials include:

  • online applications for admission;
  • official transcripts from all college and universities attended, other than Sacramento State;
  • a well-written, clearly articulated, statement of the applicant's educational and professional background and an explanation of how graduate study will advance the applicant's professional goals;
  • two letters of recommendation.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/.Details about each of the components of the supplemental application can be found on the application packet posted to the College of Education web site.

Approximately six weeks after the posted application deadline, a decision regarding admission will be emailed to each applicant.

Advancement to Candidacy Procedures

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy indicating a proposed program of graduate study. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admission requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units of courses in the graduate program (see Requirements) with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
  • met the Graduate writing requirement through completion of the Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course, CHDV 242, with a B grade or better.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies, on line, or in the department office. The student should complete the Advancement to Candidacy form after planning a degree program in consultation with a program faculty advisor. The form must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator and the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

Project/Thesis or Examination Registration

The approved Master's Thesis/Project format guide is the American Psychological Association (APA) - latest edition. Enrollment in CHDV 504 Project/Thesis course requires that the student file an Intent to Register form at least one full semester in advance of registration in these courses. For students intending to complete a project or thesis, a petition must be approved prior to beginning the project or thesis. The petition requires approval from the thesis/project sponsor, a second reader and from the Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair. Please see your list of deadlines and consult with a program advisor. Additional information about CHDV theses and projects may be found in the Thesis/Project handbook on the department web page.

Check in the Department office for the policies regarding Report in Progress ("RP") grades and continuous enrollment.

Graduation

Prior to graduation, an application for graduation must be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies. In addition, all coursework leading to the Master's degree must be completed within a seven-year period.

Master of Arts in Child Development

Units required for the MA: 30
Minimum required GPA: 3.0
No units with a grade lower than "C" may apply toward the degree.

Pre or Corequisites (7 Units)
CHDV 133Quantitative Methods in Human Development3
Select one of the following:4
Cognitive Development
Social and Emotional Development
Total Units7
Required Foundation Courses (9 Units)
CHDV 242Theoretical Approaches to Child Development3
CHDV 247Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Cross-cultural Development3
CHDV 250Research Methods3
Core Course Requirements (12 Units)
Select four of the following:12
Seminar in Social Development
Seminar in Cognitive Development
Selected Topics in Developmental Theory
Motivation and Learning in Children
Curriculum and Instruction
Language Processes in Development
Practicum in Child Development
Issues in Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities
Elective (3 Units)
Select 3 units in consultation with an advisor3
Culminating Experience (6 Units)
Thesis or Project
CHDV 290Seminar for Culminating Experience3
CHDV 504Culminating Experience in Child Development: Thesis or Project3
Total Units30

Note: Credit for CHDV 504 is given upon completion of a thesis, project, or other approved culminating experience. Open only to the graduate student who has been advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and has secured the permission of his/her faculty advisor and the Department Chair one full semester prior to registration. All forms may be obtained in the Department office or on the college web site.

Master of Science in Counseling

The following information applies to the Master of Science in Counseling with these specializations: Career Counseling; Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling;  School Counseling; and Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling.

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in the Master of Science in Counseling program requires:

  • A baccalaureate degree;
  • Good academic standing at the last college attended;
  • A grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in the last 60 semester (or 90 quarter units);
  • Completion of the University application materials;
  • Completion and submission of all Departmental application materials which include:
    • Application form;
    • Written statement(s) delineated in application;
    • Copies of transcripts (from all universities and colleges attended);
    • Professional letters of recommendation (3 total);
    • Relevant work experience.
  • Participation in an In-Person Admission Evaluation, which may include (but is not limited to) interviews, experiential activities, and writing samples.

Selected applicants, based on paper screening of completed applications, will be invited for an In-Person Admission Evaluation. Decisions for admission into the Master of Science in Counseling program are made based on a comprehensive assessment of all application materials and performance in the In-Person Admission Evaluation.

Note:  The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission.

California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST): Although evidence of passing the CBEST is not required for admission into the Pupil Personnel Services Credential programs, the CBEST must be successfully passed prior to receiving the Pupil Personnel Services Credentials.

Admission Procedure

The M.S. in Counseling accepts applications each fall for admission the following year. The program does not offer spring admissions. Applicants must complete a university application and program supplemental application by the posted application deadline date for the term applying. For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/. Prospective applicants, including Sacramento State graduates, must submit the following to the Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission; and
  • two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State; and the above delineated application materials to the Department office.

Admission is competitive with a limited number of students admitted each year. Within two weeks of the filing deadline applicants who have completed the application requirements will be assigned an In-Person Admission Evaluation date. At the end of the application and screening period, a Departmental recommendation will be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies for further review. Decisions regarding admission are then mailed to each applicant. Following admission, students are assigned to a faculty advisor who assists with academic advising.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student working toward a Master's degree must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy for the Master's degree. The purpose of this application is to provide certification to the Office of Graduate Studies that the student will complete or has completed the necessary requirements and acceptable electives for the Master's degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA. The Advancement to Candidacy application should be filed upon completion of 30 units in the program.

Note: Students must take the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or take a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver before advancing to candidacy.

The Advancement to Candidacy forms, by specialization, are obtained from the Department of Counselor Education Web site (csus.edu/coe/) within the “Forms and Handbooks” link. Students should complete the relevant form in consultation with their assigned academic advisor. Once the form is endorsed by the student and the advisor, it will be verified by the Department’s Graduate Coordinator and then forwarded to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval. (The form is also available from the Office of Graduate Studies; however, it does not include the Departmental instructions.) The completed form is submitted to the Department's Graduate Coordinator for signature, then forwarded to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.

Additional Information

The Master of Science in Counseling and the Pupil Personnel Services credentials are subject to general University and Departmental requirements. These requirements are explained in the ''Graduate Studies'' and the ''Counselor Education Department'' sections of the this catalog. Students may be disqualified when not meeting Departmental standards (see Counselor Education Student Handbook).

Students are strongly advised to remain in communication with the Department of Counselor Education (by attending group advising sessions and meeting with their assigned faculty advisor each semester) as well as with any licensing or credentialing boards related to their area(s) of specialization (i.e., Board of Behavioral Sciences, California Commission on Teacher Credentialing) since licensing and credentialing requirements may change. Catalog rights hold only degree requirements; they do not protect students from changes such as prerequisites required for a given course, field study hours, individual course requirements, or additional requirements imposed by licensing or credentialing agents. Students should note that the Counselor Education course listings are subject to modification. The revised Department listing is official.

Master of Science in Counseling

Units required for MS: 60
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Academic Residence: A minimum of 42 approved semester units in 100-, 200-, and 500-series offerings must be earned in residence at California State University, Sacramento.

Required Courses for All Specializations (44 Units)
EDC 210Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling3
EDC 214Dynamics of Human Development 13
EDC 216Counseling Theory3
EDC 218Assessment In Counseling3
EDC 219Group Processes in Counseling3
EDC 231Diagnosis and Treatment Planning3
or PSYC 268 Advanced Psychopathology
EDC 233Substance Abuse and Addiction3
EDC 244Trauma and Crisis Counseling3
EDC 250Education Research3
EDC 252Legal and Ethical Issues in Professional Counseling3
EDC 260Career Development3
EDC 280Practicum in Communication2
EDC 475Practicum In Counseling3
EDC 480Field Study In Counseling 16
Total Units44
1

 except Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling specialization

Specialization Requirements

Career Counseling (15 units)

EDC 254Counseling and Psychotropic Medicine3
EDC 262Career Counseling Process3
EDC 264Seminar in Counseling: Career Systems Development3
EDC 266Seminar in Counseling: Career Program Development3
EDC 268Career and Job Search3
Total Units15

Community Counseling (13 units)  - suspended pending deletion

EDC 201Seminar in Community Counseling: Scope, Theory and Process3
EDC 203Seminar in Community Counseling: Advanced Multicultural Counseling3
EDC 231Diagnosis and Treatment Planning3
or EDC 233 Substance Abuse and Addiction
EDS 265Current Issues in Counseling: Disabled1
Select 3 units of electives 13
Total Units13
1

If the Comprehensive Exam (0 units) is selected as the Culminating Requirement, EDC 500 is recommended as an elective.

Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling (15 units)

EDC 212Gender Roles in Counseling3
EDC 234Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling3
EDC 254Counseling and Psychotropic Medicine3
EDC 272Counseling Children and Youth3
EDC 476Practicum in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling1
Select 2 units of electives2
Total Units15

School Counseling (15 units)

EDC 234Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling3
EDC 242Play and Art in Therapy with Children3
EDC 270Organization and Administration of School Counseling Programs3
EDC 272Counseling Children and Youth3
EDC 274Guidance and Consultation in School Counseling3
Total Units15

Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling (18 Units)

EDC 240APsychological, Social and Medical Aspects of Disability, A3
EDC 240BPsychological, Social and Medical Aspects of Disability, B3
EDC 254Counseling and Psychotropic Medicine3
EDC 261Seminar in Counseling: Job Placement3
EDS 263Case Practices in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling3
EDC 462Supervised Field Observation Rehabilitation Counseling3

Culminating Requirement (1 Unit)

Written Examination. All students in the M.S. in Counseling program must enroll in EDC 500 during their first semester in the program and complete the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE). In addition, all students must prepare a final case study paper on a selected client from their current fieldwork experience.

In order to pass this multiple choice examination, a student must meet the minimum criterion score set by the Counselor Education Program. Categories covered include:

  • Human Growth and Development
  • Social and Cultural Foundations
  • Helping Relationships
  • Group Work
  • Career and Lifestyle Development
  • Appraisal
  • Research and Program Evaluation
  • Professional Orientation and Ethics

In order to pass the final case study paper, a student must obtain a score of “Meet Standard” on all elements of the case study rubric for the student’s specialization.

Service Credentials Programs

Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential

Students pursuing the Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential follow the same course requirements, with the exception of the Culminating Requirement, as do master's degree students with the School Counseling specialization objective. This program is not open to applicants who have completed master’s in counseling degrees from other institutions.

For specific course requirements see "School Counseling" listing under "Master of Science in Counseling."

Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Internship Credential

The Pupil Personnel Services Internship Credential Program is limited only to students who are already classified students in the Department of Counselor Education in the School Counseling Specialization. This program is not open to applicants from other institutions.

Requests to enter the Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Internship Credential program must originate in writing from the district superintendent or other appropriate officer stating that the individual is in a position or being offered a position (for the duration of at least one year) which requires the authorization of a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling. Issuance of the Internship Credential requires passage of the CBEST, along with all admission requirements for the Counselor Education Department.

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) - School Psychology

Units required: 95

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) - School Psychology, requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree;
  • a minimum 3.0 overall grade point average (if GPA is below 3.0, student may be accepted conditionally);
  • successfully meeting the University Graduate Writing Assessment Requirements (GWAR);
  • evidence of registration for or CBEST passing score; and the following courses or equivalents (contact a school psychology advisor for more information on equivalent experiences):
Select an Introductory Statistics course3
EDUC 155Introduction to Counseling3
EDUC 156Power, Privilege and Self Identity in Counseling3
EDUC 100A
EDUC 100B
Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings
Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings Lab 1
3
EDUC 125A
EDUC 125B
Tutoring Children in Reading
Tutoring Children in Reading Practicum
3
1

 EDUC 100A and EDUC 100B must be taken concurrently

One year of experience as a teacher or two years of experience as a teacher's aide. Experience with pupils in a variety of setting may be used as an equivalency (contact a school psychology advisor for more information on equivalent experiences)

PSYC 117Drugs and Behavior3
PSYC 168Abnormal Psychology3

In addition, candidates concurrently pursuing the Pupil Personnel Services Credential, School Psychology Endorsement, must pass the CBEST.

Applicants who have deficiencies in admission requirements that can be removed by specified additional preparation may be admitted with conditionally classified graduate status. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the student's admission application.

Admission Procedures

All students must file the following with the Sacramento State Office of Graduate Studies, River Front Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application for admission; and
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit csus.edu/gradstudies/.

At the same time, each applicant must complete a separate application for admission to the School Psychology Program:

  • the program's application is available online at csus.edu/psyc/grad-students/application%20materials;
  • three letters of reference (forms attached to application);
  • one set of transcripts;
  • evidence of experience in public schools; and
  • evidence of strong communication skills.

Department applications are due by March 1 for admission the following Fall Semester. Applications are only accepted and processed once per year, during spring semester for admission the following fall.

Plan of Study Grid
First SemesterUnits
EDC 210 Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling 3
EDS 231 Group Process in School Psychology 3
EDS 245 Psychology In The Schools 3
EDS 248 Human Development and Learning 3
 Units12
Second Semester
EDS 241 Counseling and Psychotherapy for School Psychologists 3
EDS 242A Cognitive Assessment 3
EDS 242B Cognitive Assessment Lab 4
EDSP 250 Education Research 3
EDS 440 Practicum in Individual Counseling/School Psychology 3
 Units16
Third Semester
EDS 240 Functional Assessment of Behavior 3
EDS 243A Assessment Practicum A 3
EDS 244 Social, Emotional and Behavioral Assessment 3
EDS 246A Preventive Academic Interventions 3
EDS 439A Early Fieldwork in School Psychology 2
 Units14
Fourth Semester
EDS 243A Assessment Practicum A 3
EDS 246B Preventive Mental Health Interventions 3
EDS 247 Assessment of Special Needs 3
EDS 439A Early Fieldwork in School Psychology 2
 Units11
Fifth Semester
EDS 239 Education Specialist Seminar 3
EDS 441A Internship in School Psychology 15
 Units18
Sixth Semester
EDS 441A Internship in School Psychology 15
EDS 542 Education Specialist Project: School Psychology 4 - 6
EDS 540 Education Specialist Thesis: School Psychology 4 - 6
 Units23-27
 Total Units94-98

Doctorate in Education (Ed.D.)

Admission Requirements

The Ed.D. Program admits candidates who meet the academic requirements for the Ed.D. degree program and who possess personal qualities and professional experiences that suggest a strong potential for success as doctoral candidates and as educational leaders in pre K-12 or community colleges.

The Ed.D. Program requires the following of applicants for admission to the doctoral program:

  • an earned baccalaureate degree and master's degree or the equivalent from an accredited institution of higher education with a grade point average in upper division and graduate study of 3.0 or above;
  • sufficient preparation and experience pertinent to educational leadership to benefit from the program;
  • submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores- from the three sections of the General Test taken within five years of applying to the Ed.D. program;
  • demonstrated educational leadership potential and skills including successful experience in school, postsecondary, community, and/or policy leadership;
  • demonstrated academic excellence, problem-solving ability, and an interest in critically assessing and bringing about improvements within current educational policies and practices;
  • three letters of recommendation attesting to the leadership ability and scholarship of the candidate;
  • a written statement of purpose reflecting an understanding of the challenges facing the public schools or community colleges/institutions of higher education in California;
  • a personal interview; and
  • a statement of support for the candidate’s doctoral studies from his/her employer or, in cases where this is not provided, an indication of the candidate’s plan for meeting the demands of the program and his/her professional responsibilities.

Meeting these minimum requirements qualifies an individual for admissions consideration but does not guarantee admission to the Program. Admission will be granted on a competitive basis.

In any one academic year, a limited number of students may be admitted on an exception basis without meeting one or more of the requirements established for the Ed.D. program. The number of exceptional admissions shall not exceed 15 percent of those students regularly admitted to the campus’ Ed.D. program. The intent of this exception provision is to provide for students who demonstrate particular strength in the qualities and characteristics sought for public school or community college leadership and who, at the time of seeking admission to the Ed.D. program, do not meet all the specified requirements.

Admission Procedures

Applicants must complete a university application by the posted application deadline date for the term applying. For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/. Prospective doctoral students must file the following with the Office of Graduate Studies, Riverfront Center 215, (916) 278-6470:

  • an online application that can be accessed at www.csumentor.edu/admissionapp;
  • one set of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State.

Applicants who file with the Office of Graduate Studies will receive a confirmation email, including a Sac State ID number and instructions to establish a SacLink Account. Prospective doctoral students must sign in to https://gradsup.webapps.csus.edu/ with their SacLink login to upload the following documents or forward them to the Ed.D. Program Office in the College of Education

  • the Ed.D. program supplemental application;
  • GRE results no older than 5 years from date of application;
  • written statement of purpose;
  • resume detailing education and professional experience;
  • one set of transcripts, including Sacramento State;
  • three letters of reference (forms attached to the supplemental application).

Unit Requirements

Each candidate will be required to successfully complete 60 semester units of coursework.  Each of the first two years call for completion of 18 units during the regular academic year and 6 units during each summer session. The third year of the program calls for completion of the dissertation which will entail 12 units.

The Ed.D. program is designed for completion of the degree requirements within three (3) calendar years (two semesters per academic year and summer study). The California State University, Sacramento Educational Leadership doctoral program is designed to allow completion of degree requirements within three (3) calendar years and four and a half calendar years (four years and one semester) will normally be acceptable.

Total time to qualifying examination and advancement to candidacy will not exceed three (3) years unless there are mitigating circumstances and the Ed.D. Program faculty has approved the extension; such extension normally may not exceed one year.

Total registered time is not expected to exceed five (5) years, and extension beyond this period requires approval by the Ed.D. Program faculty.

Extension of the period for degree completion beyond the period of five (5) years is normally granted to students in good academic standing, not exceed a two (2) year period. Continuation each term after the extension is granted requires determination of satisfactory progress by the Ed.D. Program faculty.

Extension of the period by more than two years can be granted only under special circumstances and based upon criteria established by the Ed.D. Program faculty. Such extension requires (a) special approval in accordance with the procedures established by the campus and (b) evidence that the student has maintained currency in the field, including demonstrated currency in literature, coursework, and research.

Satisfactory Progress Toward Degree

Each Ed.D. student is expected to maintain satisfactory progress toward the approved academic objectives as defined by the Ed.D. Program faculty and the University. The student is expected to make satisfactory progress in accordance with the Ed.D. cohort structure and program of study through the time of Advancement to Candidacy. This requires that the student complete all courses and examinations satisfactorily and Advance to Candidacy within the period for each specified by the Ed.D. Program faculty. Satisfactory progress further requires that the student pass all required examinations within two attempts.

The normal expectation is that students will attend and participate in all required program components. Students who need to make-up assignments are normally given the opportunity to do so. In the event that a student’s lack of attendance/participation would cause him/her to fail to maintain a grade point average of 3.0, the student would be notified and counseled regarding requirements for satisfactory progress toward the degree. Systemwide criteria of satisfactory academic progress are provided in Appendix 5, Title 5 of California Code of Regulations: The Doctor of Education Degree §40512(c).

Students who need to stop-out are typically provided two options. One is to take extra coursework to make up courses missed and return to their original cohort. The second is to join a later cohort that, at the time they return, is taking the classes that they missed.

Criteria for Continuation in the Program

Students must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in the program and not have a grade point average below 3.0 in any two successive terms to be considered in good academic standing. They must also meet all the requirements of graduate students outlined in the University Catalog.

Students who fall below a 3.0 grade point average in any one term will be placed on academic probation and notified of this in writing.  Students who fail to make satisfactory academic progress may be officially disqualified from the program in writing in accordance with policies established by the campus and based upon the recommendation of the Ed.D. Program faculty.

To ensure that a decision to disqualify a student because of unsatisfactory academic progress is just, basic due process requirements will be met.  Faculty will conduct a thorough review and consultation and will provide a written recommendation by the Ed.D. Program Director to the Graduate Division. The student may appeal the decision. A student who has been disqualified from the program will not be allowed to continue in the Ed.D. Program, enroll in doctoral level courses in the program, or register again in the Ed.D. Program without a formal application and re-admission to the University.

Doctorate - Educational Leadership

Doctoral Core Requirements (48 Units)
Year 1
EDD 600Transformational Leadership 13
EDD 602Policy and Practice for Educational Leaders I 13
EDD 604Data-based Decision Making in Educational Leadership 13
EDD 605Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods I 13
EDD 607Community and Communication in Educational Leadership 13
EDD 608Diversity and Equity in Complex Organizations 13
Summer Session
Year 1
EDD 609Human Resource Management for Educational Leaders 13
EDD 610Curriculum and Instruction Issues for Educational Leaders 13
Year 2
EDD 601Organizational Leadership 13
EDD 603Policy and Practice for Educational Leaders II 13
EDD 606Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods II 13
EDD 611Legal Issues for Educational Leaders 12
EDD 612Student Services in Education 12
EDD 613Finance and Budget for Educational Leaders 12
EDD 614Issues in Educational Leadership: Synthesis and Application 13
Summer Session
Year 2
EDD 615Dissertation Proposal Seminar6
Culminating Requirements (12 Units) 2
EDD 616Dissertation I6
EDD 617Dissertation II6
Total Units60
1

Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.

2

Passage of Qualifying Examination before the start of the dissertation and successful dissertation proposal defense.

EDC 201.     Seminar in Community Counseling: Scope, Theory and Process. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 280 (may be taken concurrently).


Explores the practice of community counseling by discussing the most current issues, theories and practices for community work, including its evolution and foundation. Emphasis on practices of diversity, ethics and the role of the counselor as change agent and advocate. Provides understanding of the role of the community counselor, services offered by community agencies and settings offered; examines four facets: direct community counseling, direct client services (outreach), indirect community services (influencing public policy) and indirect client services (client advocacy)

EDC 203.     Seminar in Community Counseling: Advanced Multicultural Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 210, EDC 216, EDC 280.


Advanced principles and practices of effective cross-cultural counseling including applicable theories, research, needs assessments, effective implementation and evaluation of models including situational, developmental, and community crisis intervention, and empowerment strategies for practitioners. Additional client characteristics to be explored include the factors of ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, education, cultural family values, and religious/spiritual values of the individual, family and community. Includes a fieldwork component.

EDC 210.     Multicultural/Ethnic Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


Exploration of ethnic and cultural differences to develop or expand awareness, techniques, skills, theories, concepts, and to acquire information necessary to counsel effectively with clients of various ethnic/cultural groups. Students examine their own attitudes, behaviors, perceptions, and biases, and are encouraged to develop their own multicultural approach to counseling. Lecture/discussion three hours.

EDC 212.     Gender Roles in Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


An overview of the individual and societal parameters of gender roles and sexism in self-identity, sexual behavior, health, mental health, relationships, values, abuse, violence, etc. Attitudes, research, prevention, assessment and treatment methods are addressed. Meets Board of Behavioral Science requirements in human sexuality and domestic violence.

EDC 214.     Dynamics of Human Development. 3 Units


Overview of theories and research pertaining to the dynamics of human development, including cultural, biological, social, and psychological factors. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship of these factors to the field of counseling. Lecture three hours.

EDC 216.     Counseling Theory. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.

Corequisite(s): EDC 280.


Examination of ten counseling philosophies, with emphasis on knowledge and practice. Requires the refinement of one's own counseling orientation. Designed to provide students with a foundation in the basic philosophy and practice of contemporary theories of counseling/psychotherapy. The requirements support three components of multiple measures of learning and outcomes: 1) personal growth, 2) counseling skills building utilizing multiple approaches, 3) professional development.

EDC 218.     Assessment In Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


Intended to acquaint the prospective counselor with an array of assessment instruments and appraisal techniques. Includes practical experience with tests as well as foundations of test development. Lecture three hours.

EDC 219.     Group Processes in Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155, EDUC 156, EDC 216, and EDC 280.


Group process theory and procedures, including group counseling and guidance. Participation in a group experience is required. Lecture, discussion, three hours.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDC 220.     The Spiritual Dimension in Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155, EDUC 156, EDC 216, EDC 280; or instructor permission.


Investigation into concerns and issues, modes, and methodologies surrounding exploration of the spiritual dimension in the counseling/therapy relationship. Experiential activities are included.

EDC 222.     Clinical Stress Reduction. 3 Units


Major concepts, theories, and approaches to effective stress reduction. Includes stress level assessment, planning and implementation of a stress reduction program. Practice of beneficial stress reduction techniques and application in clinical practice.

Note: Open to unclassified students with instructor permission.

EDC 230.     Law and Ethics for Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155, EDUC 156, EDC 216, EDC 280 or instructor permission.


Legal and ethical considerations in the practice of marriage, family, and child counseling. Current laws, responsibilities, restrictions, rights and privileges, licensing regulations, and ethical standards of major professional groups. Child abuse assessment and reporting requirements. Organization, administration, and management of independent practice. Lecture three hours.

EDC 231.     Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 218, EDC 280; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Advanced discussion of psychopathology with emphasis on differential diagnosis, use of DSM IV, and development of treatment plans. Use of mental status exam and structured interview schedules. Major diagnostic categories covered include schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. Completion of case reports and understanding of clinical materials using diagnosis and treatment plans will be emphasized from a diversity perspective. Lecture three hours.

EDC 232.     Family Violence. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 212, EDC 230, EDC 234; or instructor permission.


Violence in the family includes spouse abuse, child abuse, incest, and sexual abuse. Myths about these areas will be replaced by empirically-based facts. There will be an emphasis on effective treatment methods; research findings on family violence, including etiology and family patterns; overlap with alcohol and other drugs, and maintenance factors. Students will gain techniques and skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling when violence is a presenting issue.

EDC 233.     Substance Abuse and Addiction. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 231.


Provides an overview of substance abuse, addiction and co-occuring disorders with emphasis on psychoactive drugs including alcohol. Material will focus on the following areas: identification, evaluation, treatment and prevention of substance abuse and addiction, family, friends and coworker issues, legal and medical aspects of substance abuse, populations at risk, the role of support persons, support systems, and community resources.

EDC 234.     Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 214, EDC 216, EDC 280; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.

Corequisite(s): For MFCC Specialization: EDC 476.


Introduction to the basic concepts and principles of family therapy. Provides and lays the foundation on which all theories/schools of family therapy are based and covers the basic theories of family therapy. Issues include evaluation of families, diagnosis in a family context, interviewing strategies, redefining problems in a family systems context, and treatment principles. Lecture three hours.

Note: May substitute PSYC 225 with consent of faculty advisor prior to registration.

EDC 240A.     Psychological, Social and Medical Aspects of Disability, A. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Approval as a candidate for the MS degree in Counseling.


Psychological, social, and medical aspects of various congenital, hereditary, and trauma-induced disabilities are studied in-depth, particularly their relationship to vocational adjustment. The etiology, treatment, prognosis, and limitations caused by various disabling medical conditions are covered as well as such factors as depression, denial and dependency as they occur or are related to these disabling conditions. Emphasis is also given to the concepts of motivation, self-concept, and personal and societal attitudes toward disability.

EDC 240B.     Psychological, Social and Medical Aspects of Disability, B. 3 Units


This is a two-part course. Both EDC 240A and EDC 240B are required. EDC 240A is not a prerequisite for 240B.

EDC 241.     Developmental Stages and Art Therapy Techniques. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


In-depth study of normal stages of development in art with special emphasis on the developmental stages as both diagnostic indicators and aids in devising art therapy treatment. Includes hands-on experience with a variety of art therapy techniques and discussion of their applicability to different client populations. Purchase of some basic art supplies is required. Lecture, discussion, three hours.

EDC 242.     Play and Art in Therapy with Children. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 280, classified student in the School Counseling Specialization.


Explores the ways children use fantasy, play, and art as means for communication, growth and healing. Emphasis is placed on clinical skills, therapeutic limit setting, counseling theory and developmentally appropriate interventions. Purchase of some basic art supplies is required. Other Counselor Education students may be permitted to enroll when space is available.

EDC 244.     Trauma and Crisis Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


This course provides opportunities for both theory and skill development by examining crisis and trauma counseling, including crisis theory; multidisciplinary responses to crises, emergencies, or disasters; cognitive, affective, behavioral, and neurological effects associated with trauma; brief, intermediate and long-term approaches; assessment strategies for clients in crisis and principles of intervention for individuals with mental or emotional disorders during times of crisis, emergency, or disaster.

EDC 250.     Education Research. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.


Studies qualitative and quantitative methods in the development of reliable knowledge in the field of education. Includes identification and formulation of research problems, research designs and presentation of reports representative of different research strategies. Classified students are encouraged to take this course early in their graduate programs.

EDC 252.     Legal and Ethical Issues in Professional Counseling. 3 Units


Designed to provide students with basic knowledge and skills necessary to be legally and ethically competent in practice of counseling. Examines ethical and legal considerations pursuant to practice of counseling. Topics to be covered are ethics (CAMFT, AAMFT, ACA, ASCA, NCDA) related to counseling practice in private and public sectors, as well as laws regarding mandatory child and elder abuse assessment and reporting, confidentiality, privilege, liability, marriage, family, child and school ethics and law. Required for graduation with a degree in Counseling.

EDC 254.     Counseling and Psychotropic Medicine. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 231


Provides an introduction to psychopharmacology; the biological bases of behavior; basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications; and effective approaches to collaborating with clients, their families and other professionals so that appropriate referrals can be made for medication evaluations and so that the side effects of those medications can be identified. Meets the BBS licensure requirements for Professional Clinical Counselors and Marriage and Family Therapists.

EDC 260.     Career Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Provides a basic introduction to career development and career counseling. Identification and assessment of issues common in career counseling settings are examined. Group and individual models of career development and counseling in schools, community agencies or private industry are also investigated and discussed. Lecture three hours.

EDC 261.     Seminar in Counseling: Job Placement. 3 Units


Analyzes and practice of job-seeking skills, employer information base, and job placement of the handicapped.

EDC 262.     Career Counseling Process. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 260; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


On-going learning of the processes needed to deliver career counseling services to a variety of clientele. Students will extend their theoretical knowledge base and will more clearly focus on the relationship between a person's life and the process of career development. Elements to be studied in more depth include career development theory, assessment techniques and strategies, goal setting, decision making, and integration of multicultural aspects and strategies. A practical experience in administering and interpreting selected test instruments extensively used in career counseling will be included. Lecture three hours; practical experience one hour.

EDC 264.     Seminar in Counseling: Career Systems Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 260; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Specific emphasis is at the implementation level, with students learning the necessary skills for implementing, maintaining, and stimulating career development in schools, community agencies or private industry. Lecture three hours.

EDC 266.     Seminar in Counseling: Career Program Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 260; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Specific emphasis is at the program development level, with students learning the necessary components for developing a career counseling program in schools, community agencies, or private industry. Lecture three hours.

EDC 268.     Career and Job Search. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 260 or instructor permission.


Work is undergoing change with the advent of new technologies, an increasingly diverse workforce, and corporate restructuring. These conditions have led to more frequent occupational shifts and the loss of previously secure jobs, self-reliance replacing loyalty in relations between employers and employees, and fragmented careers becoming more common as family responsibilities and work opportunities became increasingly interwoven. Examines traditional and emerging approaches for assisting clients in a changing and evolving job market.

EDC 270.     Organization and Administration of School Counseling Programs. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.


Principles and practices necessary to plan, initiate, administer, and evaluate school counseling programs, including related laws. Lecture, discussion three hours.

EDC 272.     Counseling Children and Youth. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 280, classified student in Counselor Education Program.

Corequisite(s): School Counseling Specialization: EDC 475.


Provides students with a theoretical foundation and working knowledge of contemporary issues and interventions for children and youth. A variety of presenting problems and treatment strategies are explored. School specialization: EDC 242.

EDC 274.     Guidance and Consultation in School Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 280, EDC 270; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Presents a variety of topics and strategies related to the school counselor's role in implementing guidance curricula in the school. Explores models of consultation, change strategies, human relations skills, and ethical considerations. Emphasis is on the developmental nature of school counseling programming, the need for school counseling to support the larger instructional mission of the school, the role of the counselor as a change agent and the multiplcity of skills needed for successful guidance and consultation.

EDC 280.     Practicum in Communication. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155 and EDUC 156.

Corequisite(s): EDC 216.


Supervised practice in the basic styles of communication, verbal and nonverbal, with additional focus on the particular skills of selected theories. Lecture one hour; laboratory two hours.

Note: Recommended to be taken within the first 6 units of study in the Counselor Education Program.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 282.     Practicum in Group Counseling. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 219; classified student in the Counselor Education Program.


Supervised practice in leadership of group counseling. Lecture one hour; laboratory three hours.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 294.     Cooperative Education Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Open only to upper division and graduate students; consent of Department Chair.


Cooperative Education (Co-op) relates academic theory to professional practice by providing paid work experience in the student's major field of study and academic credit. Students receive supervised employment in school districts, state and community agencies, companies, and other appropriate settings. Requires attendance at weekly meetings, preparation of application packet, completion of field study assignment, and a written final report.

Note: Units may not be used to meet course work requirements. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 296P.     Current Issues in Counseling: Meditation. 1 Unit


An introductory experimental class in meditation which provides a basic foundation of basic meditative theories, the experience of meditative practices, and a basic knowledge of meditative techniques of benefit both personally and with clients. Research has demonstrated that meditation is helpful in a number of stress-related conditions and recent research indicates it is often more effective than psychotherapy in treatment of some problems.

Note: Instructor approval required. May be taken twice for credit.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 299.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units


Individual projects at graduate level designed especially for students capable of independent study.

Note: Admission by approval of the instructor with whom the student will be working directly and the Department Chair.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 462.     Supervised Field Observation Rehabilitation Counseling. 3 Units


Introduction to the vocational rehabilitation program. Students will learn about the foundations of rehabilitation counseling through discussion and visits to a number of agencies in the community. Students will spend at least 30 hours over the course of the semester in a variety of community rehabilitation facilities.

Note: Open to unclassified graduate students on a space available basis.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 475.     Practicum In Counseling. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites for all specializations: EDC 210, EDC 214, EDC 216, EDC 280.

Corequisite(s): By specialization: School - EDC 272.


Supervised counseling practice in agency and/or school settings. Emphasis on application of counseling theories and the integration of one's own counseling philosophy into practical applications. Basic requirements: 100 clock hours with at least 40 client contact hours, 1 hour per week of individual/triadic supervision, and one and half hours per week of group supervision.

Note: Department petition is required the semester prior to enrollment. Additional prerequisites by specialization: Career - EDC 212+, EDC 218, EDC 219+, EDC 260, EDC 262+; Community - EDC 201, EDC 212+, EDC 218, EDC 219; MFCC - EDC 212, EDC 218+, EDC 219, EDC 234, EDC 252+, EDC 476; School - EDC 252+, EDC 270.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 476.     Practicum in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): EDC 216, EDC 280, classified student in the Counselor Education Program.

Corequisite(s): EDC 234.


Structured observation and supervised practice in marriage, family, and child counseling. Application of material learned in EDC 234. Emphasis on establishing relationships and interviewing techniques with multiple clients, assessment techniques, setting goals, and learning to think systemically. Laboratory two hours.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 480.     Field Study In Counseling. 2 - 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDC 475 and all of its prerequisities.

Corequisite(s): By specialization: School - EDC 272.


Supervised counseling and field experiences arranged in community-based settings such schools, colleges and/or agencies. One hundred clock hours of experience required for each unit of credit for a total of six hundred clock hours (or 6 units). Weekly supervision is provided throughout the field experience: one hour per week of individual/triadic supervision and one and half hours per week of group supervision.

Note: Department petition and approval of faculty advisor is required the semester prior to enrollment. Additional prerequisites by specialization: MFCC - completion of required courses except culminating requirement.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 500.     Master's Culminating Experience. 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy for the master's degree and enrollment in the last semester of course work; Classified student in the Counselor Education Program; Department petition required the semester prior to enrollment.


Focuses on reviewing and synthesizing of student's knowledge of theory, and practice. A review and examination of previous learning will be included.

Note: Taken in preparation for the comprehensive examination.

Credit/No Credit

EDC 551.     Master's Project - Counseling - Plan B. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy.


Completion of a project approved for the Master's degree.

Note: Department petition is required the semester prior to enrollment. All course requirements in Counselor Education and EDC 505.

EDD 600.     Transformational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Designed to engage students in understanding, implementing, and evaluating strategic leadership practices based on various theories, models, and approaches for achieving organizational transformation. Students will become skilled facilitators of the organizational transformation process by initiating, implementing, sustaining, and evaluating transformation/change efforts. Students will build a solid foundation through the integration of theory and practice in order to implement a planned change process in their home institution.

EDD 601.     Organizational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Builds and expands on candidates' knowledge of systems thinking, personal and organizational behaviors, and leadership approaches to the change process. Candidates will demonstrate ethical thinking and action in organizational settings by re-conceptualizing leadership roles and organizational structures. In coursework and related fieldwork components students will apply concepts and theories to improving their respective educational institutions. Among the interactive pedagogies used are: case studies, experiential exercises, dialogue and group activities.

EDD 602.     Policy and Practice for Educational Leaders I. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Develops in students the skills for informed analysis of educational policy in order to positively influence the educational policy in the K-12 or community college setting. In addition to studying the historical perspectives pertaining to educational policy, practice, and reform, students will investigate the mission of public education. Students will also study governance and inter-governmental relations through contemporary policy development with particular reference to current law, local board policy, shared governance, and working with a variety of constituencies.

EDD 603.     Policy and Practice for Educational Leaders II. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Designed to engage students in critical analyses of policy at the local, state, national, and international levels. Specific California and federal policy environment structures and processes will be examined. Students will learn about how public policy is generated, potential consequences, ethical dilemmas, social justice, and equity issues.

EDD 604.     Data-based Decision Making in Educational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Studies the use of quantitative and qualitative data by K-12 and community college leaders to improve student and organizational outcomes. Students will develop enhanced data literacy and analytical skills to facilitate data-based decision making in the identification of problems and development of solutions and evaluation plans. General concepts and techniques of data analysis, generation, and presentation will be learned with specific application to educational issues including program assessment and evaluation, resource planning and allocation, and strategic planning.

EDD 605.     Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods I. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Focuses on the design, conceptualization, interpretation, and application of qualitative, quantitative, and mix-method research procedures. Helps students acquire skills and gain knowledge in using a wide range of methodological and analytical research techniques with an eye towards students' dissertation projects and field application in educational leadership.

EDD 606.     Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods II. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Introduces educational leaders to concepts in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods research in preparation for conducting independent research. Enables students to critically understand research methodology and apply it appropriately to various educational issues. Topics will include the framing of research questions, identifying data and data sources, and using theory in the design process. Enables educational leaders to critically understand research methodology and apply in it appropriately and effectively to educational issues.

EDD 607.     Community and Communication in Educational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Presents theories and frameworks concerning organizational, interpersonal, and cross-cultural communication in educational and community contexts. Includes developing written and verbal skills for specific contexts, including strategic planning, evaluation, presentations, formal and informal texts, technology, crisis management, and public relations. Through research and practical application, enhances communication skills needed for creating inclusive systems and positive results for all stake-holders.

EDD 608.     Diversity and Equity in Complex Organizations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Designed to engage students in self introspection of awareness and advocacy in applying theoretical frameworks and research to promote equitable, excellence in schooling. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop cross-cultural relationships across multiple constituents for the purpose of improving students performance and promoting social justice. Students will develop the capacity to be courageous change agents in assuring academic excellence for all students.

EDD 609.     Human Resource Management for Educational Leaders. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Examines how to manage human resources effectively in the dynamic legal, social, and economic environment currently impacting educational institutions. Among the topics included are: formulation and implementation of human resource strategy, job analysis, methods of recruitment and selection, techniques for training and development, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of human resource management frameworks and practices. Class participants will be expected to demonstrate understanding of Human Resource Management (HRM) competencies through assignments, exercises and case analyses.

EDD 610.     Curriculum and Instruction Issues for Educational Leaders. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Presents curriculum and instruction from a leadership perspective within the contexts of K-12 schools and community colleges. Students examine contemporary issues in school curriculum, including policy initiatives and reform efforts affecting curricular decision-making. Prepares students to analyze and design appropriate strategies for implementing and evaluating district and school curricula and to investigate the implications of curricula for educational programming. Students also learn specific foundations and procedures for professional development that have well-documented effects on student achievement.

EDD 611.     Legal Issues for Educational Leaders. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Examines key legal issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of educational leaders. Focuses on understanding California and federal codes, case law, policies, and significant precedent and will emphasize analysis of key legal concepts and application of law to major areas including finance, personnel, risk management, curriculum, student services, teacher rights, torts, students rights, and access. Examines trends in law and the initiation and influence of educational law to positively influence educational institutions.

EDD 612.     Student Services in Education. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Provides a comprehensive insight into the student services. It addresses both practical and theoretical perspectives intended to build a sense of vision and passion to transform the profession of student affairs and leadership. In particular, examines four distinct arenas: 1) historical and philosophical foundations of student affairs and leadership 2) management and organizational issues, 3) essential skills and professional development in building an equitable organization, and 4) the synthesis of practice and theory.

EDD 613.     Finance and Budget for Educational Leaders. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Analyzes two related topics with respect to public educational institutions: funding and internal budget management. Provides a state and national overview of the economics and finance of K-12 and higher education, including private and public benefits of education, methods of financing public education, and contemporary policy issues regarding school and college finances. Focuses on how educational leaders can most effectively manage resources to further the vision, goals, and philosophy of the organization.

EDD 614.     Issues in Educational Leadership: Synthesis and Application. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Program and instructor permission.


This problem based seminar integrates the three themes of the program. Includes conducting a review of the literature that will later be integrated into the candidates' proposal. In addition, each student will study and select theoretical frame/s that supports their doctoral topic. Students will also work in teams formed by research interests. They will present findings to classmates in forums that they facilitate and they will critique each other's work.

EDD 615.     Dissertation Proposal Seminar. 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Passed Ed.D. Qualifying Examination and instructor permission.


Provides faculty and peer guidance in preparation of material to develop the dissertation proposal. Students will be guided in the clarification of dissertation topic, familiarization with relevant literature, and the development of a sound methodology. Students will learn how to critically analyze and provide constructive criticism to key research components proposed by others. At the end students are expected to complete the first three chapters of their dissertation in anticipation of their dissertation defense.

EDD 616.     Dissertation I. 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Each candidate will work with a dissertation advisor (dissertation committee chair) to conduct independent research leading to the completion of a dissertation. Twelve units of dissertation study will be required for completion of the program.

Note: Students must have passed their qualifying examination and successfully defended their dissertation proposal.

Credit/No Credit

EDD 617.     Dissertation II. 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Program and completion of EDD 616 and instructor permission.


Each candidate will work with a dissertation advisor (dissertation committee chair) to conduct independent research leading to the completion of a dissertation. Twelve units of dissertation study will be required for completion of the program.

EDGR 210.     Contemporary Issues in Education: Curriculum and Social Emotional Well Being of Students. 3 Units


This course examines contemporary issues in education, with special attention to the social, cultural, political, economic, and institutional dynamics of educational processes and the impacts on students, schools, and communities. Fulfilling the mission of the Masters programs and the College of Education vision, the course focuses on preparing students to become social change agents in schools and communities. Topics covered will fit into the two threads of (a) curriculum and (b) social emotional well-being of students.

EDGR 211.     Contemporary Issues in Education: Context of Schooling and Leadership. 3 Units


This course examines contemporary issues in education, with special attention to the social, cultural, political, economic, and institutional dynamics of educational processes and the impacts on students, schools, and communities. Fulfilling the mission of the Masters programs and the College of Education vision, the course focuses on preparing students to become social change agents in schools and communities. Topics covered will fit into the two threads of (a) context of schooling and (b) leadership.

EDGR 220.     Issues in New Literacies throughout the Lifespan. 3 Units


This course examines contemporary issues in literacy. The course introduces students to pedagogies and politics of new literacies within a variety of contexts: academic, new literacy studies, technology literacy, cultural, family, community, and workplace literacy. From a frame of literacy/illiteracy, students examine its connections with economic, political, social, occupational, education, governmental, and cultural change. Students will study how literacy programs are organized and implemented, examine research on the rationale for literacy, including the connection between literacy and healthy, livelihoods, empowerment, community development and cognitive skills.

EDGR 260.     Writing and Research Across the Disciplines. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate program in the College of Education or instructor permission


Orientation to graduate study design to introduce students to research within their field of study and across disciplines in the College of Education. Overview of qualitative and quantative methods and basic statistical concepts. Focus on writing to communicate evidence-based knowledge in a professional manner using APA style. Includes research presentations, active discussion, critical reading, and analytical writing with some activities.

Note: This course serves as a foundation for further study and must be taken prior to 250. This course satisfies the GWI requirement.

EDLP 200.     Diversity and Equity in Educational Leadership. 3 Units


Designed to synthesize previously obtained knowledge of different cultures/ethnic groups/races and social classes. The primary objective is to provide a learning environment which is conducive to the development of knowledge, understanding, and skills consistent with multicultural education and pluralistic education philosophy.

EDLP 200A.     Diversity and Equity in Educational Leadership. 3 Units


Primary objective is to provide a learning environment conducive to the development of knowledge, understanding and skills consistent with Multicultural Education and pluralistic philosophy. It will examine the advantages and complexities of a strategic approach to school and community relationships. Content will focus on public policy formation; community education role of culturally and linguistically diverse groups; current recommendations and emerging issues as they relate to the role of the school, family, and community in the ongoing debate of school reform.

EDLP 201.     Foundations of Educational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.


Introduction to theory and practice of educational leadership at the local, state, and federal level including structure and function of administration, organizational behavior, intrapersonal dimensions, and interpersonal relationships.

EDLP 201A.     Foundations of Educational Leadership. 3 Units


Introduction to theory and practice of educational administration at the local, state, and federal levels including but not limited to the structure and function of administration, organizational behavior, interpersonal relationships, trends affecting contemporary practice, and the changing nature of school reform. Designed to encourage introspection and the reflective process to examine students' values, beliefs and needs. Students will examine strategies for integrating new information and experiences into their evolving professional knowledge base.

Note: May be taken twice for credit (Adm Credential Interns).

EDLP 202A.     Legal Basis of Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Study of school law as set forth in the common law, state, and federal constitutions, statutes, judicial decisions, and in the rules and regulations of state departments and local units of administration.

EDLP 203A.     Financial Resources Planning and Allocation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDLP 201


School finance and business administration with focus on the California school system.

EDLP 204B.     Special Education and Categorical Programs. 3 Units


Introduction to the organization, leadership, and management of special education and categorical programs. Provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, ethical and legal roots of education for both special education and students served by state and federal categorical programs.

EDLP 205.     Curriculum Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Curriculum development appropriate to a modern program of education; the service role of the leader in instructional improvement; cultural, social, and political forces acting to shape the curriculum.

EDLP 205A.     Curriculum and Instructional Leadership in K-12 Schools. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDLP 201


Focuses on the significance of instructional leadership in the design and implementation of curriculum leading to high achievement for all students in K-12 schools. Particular attention will be given to current state and federal school accountability requirements, standards-based curriculum, the use of disaggregated student achievement data to design an instructional program appropriate to and effective for a diverse student population, and best research-based instructional practices.

EDLP 206A.     Supervision and Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educational Leadership Program and instructor permission.


Supervisory theory and technique, including assessment of educational innovations, supervision of teaching, development of strategies for in-service programming, and the roles of various groups and individuals in the improvement of instruction.

EDLP 208A.     School Leadership/Management. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educational Leadership Program


Examination, synthesis, and application of contemporary leadership/management theory and processes at the site or unit level; consideration given to the expanding roles and current requirements in the administration of educational enterprises. Lecture three hours per week.

EDLP 209A.     Human Resources and Supervision. 3 Units


Examines human resources and personnel practices in educational organizations. Key themes and issues in personnel will be presented with broad assumptions regarding dominant practices and their application to establishing positive human relations.

EDLP 221.     Foundations in Higher Education Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Analyzes higher education including its historical, political, philosophical and social aspects with emphasis upon the implications of crucial issues for leaders in higher education. An examination of the historical origins of contemporary practices and discourse and an analysis of the complex relationships between society and institutions of higher education: patterns of governance and coordination; diversity; overview of organizational and administrative structure; faculty; curriculum; student affairs, policy, and demographic trends.

EDLP 222.     Diversity in Higher Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Engages participants in a process of inquiry and reflection through self-critique, peer critique, and the dialogical examination of our assumptions, ideas, and understandings that promote intellectual growth. Participants will examine and discuss the literature, research, and discourse concerning theory, policy, and practice about diversity and its relation to higher education.

EDLP 223.     Advanced Seminar: Student Affairs Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Administration of student services and student affairs in colleges and universities. Principles that guide professional practice and decision making will be explored, as will the roles and responsibilities of student affairs professionals. Students will have the opportunity to explore current and future issues and directions in student services.

EDLP 224.     Advanced Seminar: Program Development and Evaluation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Program development, processes, and procedures, including needs assessment and writing goals and objectives. An exploration of administrative roles and responsibilities. Formative, summative, and impact evaluation strategies, including empowerment evaluation, planning for evaluation, and analyzing and applying evaluation data for program improvement.

EDLP 225.     Advanced Seminar: Ethical Decision Making. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Links analysis with action through a survey of the ethical, legal, and professional issues facing the public or private education administrator. Underlying decision making is to understand the basic nature of the academic enterprise and apply social and moral values to the management of higher education and ethical decision making.

EDLP 226.     Meeting the Leadership Challenge. 3 Units


Explore and analyze the leadership styles, qualities and characteristics that are common to effective leaders and the leadership skills and knowledge necessary to effectively lead in California's community colleges. The history, mission, and culture of the California Community College system and the students it serves will also be examined. Topics such as consultation, shared governance, legislative and accrediting bodies, and other external groups that influence policy and decision-making in higher education will be discussed.

EDLP 227.     Leading the Way for Student Success: Student and Instructional Services. 3 Units


Participants will explore changing demographics, accountability regarding statewide mandates, reporting regulations, and accreditation, new technology and other factors impacting California's community college student services programs and professionals. Gain an understanding of the philosophy and mission of student services initiatives and programs and student development theory. Examine the role of faculty as leaders in curriculum, instruction and assessment and student success. Understand the purposes and uses of research and technology to address student outcomes, teaching and learning, institutional effectiveness, and decision-making.

EDLP 228.     Innovative Leadership for Troubled Times: Budget/Finance and Human Resources. 3 Units


California community college leaders are presented with increased legislative and public pressure for accountability while in an era of chronic and disparate under-funding of the system. Understand the relationship between higher education finance and the overall fiscal operations of California's community college system. Gain a broad knowledge of human resource laws and regulations and explore issues of faculty and staff diversity, part-time and full-time faculty, collective bargaining, affirmative action, staff development and recruitment, and selection and retention of staff.

EDLP 230.     Master of Arts Thesis/Project Seminar. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): EDLP 250 and advancement to candidacy.


This individualized seminar is designed to extend research knowledge, and provide direction in the use of library/professional education resources, as well as exposure to sample theses and projects using APA style. Reviews research methods and a review of the literature and provides instruction in the appropriate academic writing style and format for academic presentations.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 250.     Education Research. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the EDLP Program.


Studies qualitative and quantitative methods in the development of reliable knowledge in the field of education. Includes identification and formulation of research problems, research designs and presentation of reports representative of different research strategies. Establishes and improves students' professional and academic writing skills in preparation for leadership duties. Classified students are encouraged to take this course early in their graduate programs.

Note: Graduate Writing Intesive (GWI) course.

EDLP 255.     Field Experience Seminar. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 units including EDLP 200, EDLP 201, and either EDLP 205 or EDLP 206A for Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential students only.

Corequisite(s): EDLP 401 and/or EDLP 402 for Administrative Services Credential students only.


Experience and practice in observation and analysis of school environment, including disaggregated student achievement data.

Note: Intern Students are allowed to take class twice and can take course concurrently with EDLP 401 and EDLP 402.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 270.     Advanced Seminar: Applied Leadership and Staff Teambuilding. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate level status within the School of Education and instructor permission.


Develop a comprehensive theoretical/conceptual framework from which to view current research surrounding Organizational Leadership and Staff Teambuilding. Special emphasis will be on providing students with experiential learning activities beyond the classroom and incorporate challenging outdoor components. Students will develop a resource portfolio relevant to their unique work situations.

EDLP 273.     Advanced Seminar: Grants, Proposals and Systematic Planning. 3 Units


Systematic planning theory and skills with particular attention to use of these skills in the development of grant proposals. Students will use funding agency regulations and guidelines relative to program development and implementation, and will develop a proposal which may be submitted to a funding agency.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 277.     Advanced Seminar: Assessment. 2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admitted into the Professional Administrative Credential.


Engage participants in a process of ongoing assessment of their administrative practice as school leaders. Such ongoing assessment uses multiple points of data, multiple sources of information, and multiple feedback sources such as colleagues and mentors.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 286.     Advanced Seminar: Supervision and Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Educational Leadership Program, EDLP 206A, instructor permission.


Through lecture and discussion, philosophical and practical problems of supervision of instruction will be explored. Current research on effective teaching, staff development, supervisory techniques, and theories of learning for both students and adults will be examined as a basis for sound supervision practices.

EDLP 292.     Advanced Seminar: Current Topics in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. 3 Units


Selected current topics of concern to those involved with the administration of schools and other educational systems.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 293.     Induction Seminar. 2 Units


Induction Seminar leads to the training experience of the Professional Administrative Services Credential candidate. Facilitates the interaction among candidate, district mentor, and university advisor, per standards of the Commission on Teaching Credentialing. Through guided practice, candidates are prompted and supported in developing an individualized induction plan. This induction plan includes mentoring, academic program at the university and non-campus components.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 296A.     Capstone Research Project. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Candidacy


Each student conducts an individual project to fulfill the culminating experience graduation requirement. The course covers application of research in education to the professional practice of educational leadership, and integrates the accumulated knowledge, skills and strategies delivered in the program. This course is the culmination of the MA in Educational Leadership/Higher Education Leadership, leading to completion of the final project and the 4-semester degree.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 296D.     Leading with Technology in Institutions of Higher Education. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admissions to the Master's of Education: Higher Education Leadership Option.


Geared specifically to meet the needs of those leaders in higher education. Those new to technology or those who want to learn more about using technology to lead programs and institutions of high education. Participants will be provided with an array of appropriate educational technology resources to drive decision making practices. They will also learn various programs and software used to address enrollment management, admissions, records, fiscal matters, etc.

EDLP 299.     Special Problems Educational Leadership. 1 - 4 Units


Individual projects or directed reading.

Note: Departmental petition required. Professional Credential Students only may take up to 8 units.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 299T.     Special Problems - Educational Leadership. 3 Units


Individual projects or directed reading - for students working on their culminating MA requirements.

Note: Departmental petition required.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 401.     Internship On-the-Job Experience. 8 Units


First semester of the on-the-job internship experience. Interns are supervised in the administrative roles by sponsoring employing agency, as well as by university faculty. Limited to, and required of, internship candidates for the Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 402.     Internship On-the-Job Experience. 8 Units


Second semester of the on-the-job internship experience. Interns are supervised by sponsoring employing agency, as well as by university sponsors. Limited to, and required of, candidates for the Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 403.     Internship On-the-Job Experience. 8 Units

Corequisite(s): EDLP 413.


Third semester of the on-the-job experience for candidates who have not completed their credential requirements during the first year of internship. (Refer to EDLP 401.) Limited to, and required of, candidates for the Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 404.     Internship On-the-Job Experience. 8 Units

Corequisite(s): EDLP 414.


Fourth semester of the on-the-job internship experience. (Refer to EDLP 403.)

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 413.     Supplemental Internship Experience. 6 Units

Corequisite(s): EDLP 403.


Third semester of the supplemental internship experience. Provides first-hand visitations and experiences in various educational and community agencies at state, county, district, and local school levels; additional supervised experience for candidates; and seminar experiences in observation and analysis of school environments for candidates for the Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 414.     Supplemental Internship Experience. 6 Units

Corequisite(s): EDLP 404.


Fourth semester of the supplemental internship experience. Provides first-hand visitations and experiences in various educational and community agencies at state, county, district, and local school levels; additional supervised experience for candidates; and seminar experiences in observation and analysis of school environments for candidates for the Preliminary Administrative Services Internship Credential.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 495A.     Field Study in Educational Leadership. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Educational Leadership Program; completion of twelve (12) units of EDLP coursework, including EDLP 255; approval of faculty advisor.


On-the-job experience in which the candidate assumes responsibility for observation and analysis of school environments including leadership responsibilities, supervision of instructional program, and overall school climate.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 498.     Advanced Administrative Field Experience. 8 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Professional Administrative Services Credential Program and full-time employment as a school administrator.


Candidates for the Professional Administrative Services Credential are supervised in full-time administrative roles by sponsoring employment agency and university faculty.

Credit/No Credit

EDLP 500A.     Master of Arts Thesis/Project. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy and chair permission of his/her thesis or project committee.


Completion of a thesis or project approved for the Master's degree.

EDLP 500B.     Master of Arts Thesis/Project. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy and chair permission of his/her thesis or project committee.


Completion of a thesis or project approved for the Master's degree.