Criminal Justice

College of Health and Human Services

Program Description

Criminal Justice encompasses multidisciplinary examinations of crime, crime control, the justice process, and justice institutions. The discipline addresses definitions, causation, prevention, investigation, legal process, treatment, rehabilitation, and research relating to crime and justice as well as the institutions of the justice system and their administration.

The comprehensive program at Sacramento State covers every aspect of the field. Courses are offered which span the entire system of justice administration in both public and private sectors.

The Division of Criminal Justice:

  • Seeks to identify and increase understanding of major social issues related to crime, criminals, prevention and control, and victims.
  • Features a large and diverse faculty combining scholars from a variety of disciplines who have contributed extensively to the justice field with practitioners who have many years of experience in justice administration.
  • Offers a flexible undergraduate major, combined with highly structured advising, which allows the student to shape an undergraduate program specifically to prepare for employment in multiple areas of criminal justice, advanced study in criminal justice, or law school.
  • Features a Master of Science curriculum allowing students to focus study on either theoretical aspects of crime or justice administration.
  • Offers direct access to many local, state, and federal agencies through internships and fieldwork.

Many graduates find positions with various federal, state, and local criminal justice agencies. Others have pursued advanced study in criminology and law. Employment opportunities for Criminal Justice majors have remained strong for the past decade both with government agencies and in private security and future demand appears assured.

The Criminal Justice program at Sacramento State is one of the most highly sought after programs in Northern California. Due to the large number of applications, the program is now officially impacted. Students wishing to become Criminal Justice majors must complete a series of required lower division courses and then must apply for admission to the program. It is highly recommended that interested students speak with a Criminal Justice advisor as soon as possible.

Career Possibilities

Investigative positions, most with law enforcement authority, with federal, state, and local agencies such as the FBI, ATF, Secret Service, DEA, Homeland Security Administration, state level Departments of Justice, Alcohol Beverage Control, Department of Motor Vehicles, District Attorney's and Public Defender's Offices · Includes uniformed peace officer positions within local and state governments, such as: police officer, deputy sheriff, highway patrol, and natural resources officer, including crime scene specialists, and crime analysts · Correctional peace officer positions including state and local probation officers and parole agents within adult and juvenile correctional systems · Includes non-sworn correctional counselors and administrators. Private corporate security agents and investigators such as those employed by banks and insurance companies and transportation companies, including loss-prevention specialists · Victim services and officer services positions within a wide variety of social service agencies related to crime, justice, and rehabilitation · In addition, graduates can pursue advanced degrees in law or research disciplines, and may apply to military officer candidate schools.

Contact Information

Ernest Uwazie, Chair
Raquel Quirarte, Coordinator of Advising Center
Alpine Hall 137
(916) 278-6487
www.csus.edu/HHS/CJ

Faculty

BOGAZIANOS, DIMITRI

CANTON, CECIL

CATER, OWEN

CROISDALE, TIM

ESCOBAR, SUE

FARMER, YVETTE

GETTY, RYAN

GUTIERREZ, RICKY

HERNANDEZ, JAMES

HUANG, SHIHLUNG

JONES, MARLYN

KUBICEK, LAURIE

LEE, LYNETTE

LOVING, RUSSELL

MIZRAHI, STEPHANIE

NOBLE, JENNIFER

OKADA, DANIEL

REN, XIN

SCHNURBUSH, KIM

SINGER, JENNIE

SWIM, DAVID H.

UWAZIE, ERNEST

 

Law as a Career

Lawyers are often called upon to fill many varied and complex roles. At various times they function as advocates, social planners, and mediators. Because society turns most frequently to the legal profession when it looks for a method of balancing changing conditions and traditional values, lawyers are social planners. Lawyers play a weighty role in our society and have a tremendous responsibility, not only to the citizenry which they serve, but also to the law itself, and to the concept of justice, to which they must be committed.

Pre-Law Education

The student's cumulative undergraduate GPA and his/her score on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) are the primary factors on which law schools base their admissions decisions. The importance of these factors cannot be overestimated. Assuming that you qualify in this manner for admissions, your undergraduate course of study plays a role in preparing for the study and practice of law.  Students interested in law school should visit the Law School Admission Council’s website www.lsac.org early in their college careers in order to learn about the process of preparing for and applying to law school.

Undergraduate Program

It would be unwise and, perhaps, impossible to prescribe a specific course of study and assert that it is the best one can receive in preparation for entering law school. Therefore, there is no established major for pre-law students. In 1988, the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) expressed the view that the ''quality of education is concerned with the development of basic skills and insights. It thus involves education for:

  1. comprehension and expression in words;
  2. critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals;
  3. creative power in thinking;
  4. knowledge of computers and word processing."

While no one major embraces all of these characteristics and, while personal development in these areas is an individualistic effort molded to one's particular strengths, weaknesses, and interests, the University offers numerous courses which give training in these skills. The following areas of study encompass these recommendations and suggest courses which prepare students for the study and practice of law.

  • Business: When an individual becomes a lawyer, he/she also becomes a member of the business community; hence, classes in business are beneficial to the pre-law student. Competence in this field can make the difference between an organized, successful lawyer and a bewildered, ineffective one. Furthermore, the practical judgment one develops in business classes frequently allows one to penetrate the legal maze and to quickly reach the important issues of any case.
  • Computer Science: In an age where information storage and problem solving is increasingly accomplished by computers, a lawyer cannot afford to venture into the future without a working knowledge of computers.
  • Criminal Justice: The Division of Criminal Justice includes three law courses in its core curriculum and offers the option of additional law and constitutional theory courses among its electives. The department offers intern placements in law related positions. Law courses are instructed in the case study method used in law schools. This instruction allows a student to determine their level of interest and aptitude for legal studies while still an undergraduate. Several members of the teaching faculty are attorneys, and law courses are taught by attorneys licensed by the bar. In addition, the major in criminal justice offers a general orientation to the justice field and provides students a suggested pre-law course of study engineered to provide an excellent foundation for the study of law.
  • Economics: As the AALS asserts: ''Economics is a science that calls upon the student to master patterns of thought, to explore questions of causation and to probe potentials for solutions.'' Since many legal problems ultimately involve economic issues, a study of economics will benefit the pre-law student.
  • History and Government: We are a product of yesterday in our society, our customs and our laws. Without a general understanding of history and how it relates to our present state, the lawyer cannot appreciate the intimate relationship laws have with our culture. By failing to comprehend the relationship between our society, its governmental institutions, and its laws, one risks not understanding certain laws intelligible only in terms of their historical and institutional significance.
  • Logic and Mathematics: Since the law is abstract, those considering law school need training in the reasoning powers essential for dealing with abstract concepts. The study of logic and mathematics provides the practice needed for developing the ability to think logically.
  • Oral and Written Communication: The lawyer is primarily a communicator; whether in the courtroom or in the legislature, as a counselor or negotiator, he/she must know how to communicate on many levels with precision and style.
  • Philosophy: A sizable number of students of philosophy go on to law school and there are now many successful philosopher-lawyers. This is no mere coincidence. Legal questions often raise issues of profound philosophical import. And the two fields share many of the same methods of reasoning and argumentation. The Philosophy Department's Major Concentration in Applied Ethics and Law is specifically designed to prepare prospective students for the intellectual rigors of law school.
  • Science and Engineering: Students who concentrate in the sciences or in engineering develop the ability to think clearly and concisely. The rigor and discipline required in these courses is valuable training for the law school years.
  • Social Sciences: Since both law and social science deal with behavior and its implications, lawyers draw on the social sciences for an understanding of human behavior. Applying the tools of the other social sciences to the practice of law enhances the effectiveness of the attorney.

Obviously, one cannot receive degrees in all of these areas; it is suggested that the pre-law student choose a major which interests him/her and supplement this curriculum with as many courses from other areas as possible. In addition to this, the pre-law student should read widely in areas outside the major.

Pre-Law Student Organization

The Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International has been formed by pre-law students to meet the needs of students interested in preparing for a career in law.  CSU, Sacramento has an active Phi Alpha Delta chapter and information about joining can be acquired by visiting one of the campus pre-law advisors.

Grades

Good grades are essential to those interested in being accepted at a well regarded school. However, it should be clear that one does not benefit from being so grade conscious that the major criterion for course selection becomes the likelihood of receiving an "A." Tough, demanding professors and courses are essential for training the mind to perform well under the pressures of law school. Challenging, thought-provoking courses are the best way to prepare for the LSAT, for success in law school and as a member of the legal profession. Moreover, when undergraduate transcripts are viewed by law school admission committees, a great deal of attention is given to the difficulty and the desirability of the courses chosen by the student. For law school admission, grades of "I" (Incomplete) or "W" (Withdrawal) are not included in computing the overall GPA. However, a grade of “WU” or "NC" (No Credit) is counted as an "F," and if a course is repeated, the two grades are averaged.  Students should also note that failure to complete work for a grade posted as “I” will result in the “I” converting to an “F” after two semesters.

LSAT

The LSAT is the second major factor considered by law schools in determining admissibility.  It is administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC).  Everything a student needs to know about the LSAT is available at www.lsac.org.  The test measures abilities and skills related to problem identification, analysis, logical reasoning, and reading. In addition, the LSAT includes a written essay, copies of which will be sent to individual law schools to enable them to evaluate a candidate's writing ability. Because many law schools consider the LSAT as influential, or more influential, than the GPA, it is important that students prepare for the test very carefully.  Students who believe they may qualify for a fee waiver because of serious financial need should apply for the LSAC fee waiver at www.lsac.org.  The fee waiver will cover the student’s LSAT and Credential Assembly Service fees as well as provide materials that will enable the student to prepare for the LSAT. 

There are a number of preparation courses available for students intending to take the LSAT. Students are advised to investigate particular review classes and to assess their ability to prepare successfully for the LSAT without benefit of these often costly courses. The best LSAT preparation materials are those published by the LSAC.

Letters of Recommendation

Most law schools require between one to three letters of recommendation from individuals who can comment on the applicant's potential as a law student. The individuals selected to write letters of recommendation should be able to comment extensively on the applicant's academic capabilities. And, obviously, the evaluation should be a positive one. Letters should also discuss the applicant's ability to comprehend, to communicate, and to critically analyze concepts.

Credential Assembly Service

Student’s must register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) at www.lsac.org in order to submit applications for American Bar Association accredited law schools.  There is a fee associated with registration for the CAS which is waived if the student is approved for the LSAC fee waiver.  The CAS compiles a report that contains the student’s personal information, LSAT score(s), transcripts, letters of recommendation and, if prepared, recommender evaluations.  The student completes each individual law school application online using their account at www.lsac.org.  Once the student has submitted the application the law school requests the CAS report and it is transmitted electronically to them by the LSAC.

Personal Statement

Most law schools require the applicant to submit a personal statement in which the applicant tells the law school something about the applicant's background, the reasons why the applicant wants to study law, and, in some instances, what the applicant hopes to do following law school.  This is an extremely important component of the application.  It provides the student with an opportunity to share their personal background and experiences with the law school admissions committee.  Students should take time to carefully craft the personal statement and should seek advice from trusted friends, professors and their pre-law advisor to help them in the writing process.

Pre-Law Advisors

Laurie Kubicek, Criminal Justice
Alpine Hall 103, 278-5066

Russell Loving, Criminal Justice
Alpine Hall 110, 278-6473

Stephanie Mizrahi, Criminal Justice
Alpine Hall 107, 278-6387

Jennifer Noble, Criminal Justice
www.csus.edu/HHS/CJ/Advising/prelaw.html

Undergraduate Programs

Major

To become a Criminal Justice major, the student must first have successfully completed the following courses or their equivalent with a grade of "C" or better:

CRJ 1Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society3
CRJ 2Law of Crimes3
CRJ 4General Investigative Techniques3
CRJ 5The Community and the Justice System3

Students who wish to become a Criminal Justice minor must contact the Division of Criminal Justice.

Most upper division Criminal Justice courses are restricted to Criminal Justice majors or minors or permission of instructor. Students interested in Criminal Justice majors or minors are encouraged to contact the Criminal Justice Student Advising Center.

Criminal Justice majors are assigned a faculty advisor at the time they are approved for admission into the major.  Majors must meet with their assigned faculty advisor during their first semester.  Advising appointments are scheduled in the Criminal Justice Office Alpine Hall 137.

BS Degree in Criminal Justice

Units required for Major: 60
Minimum total units required for the BS: 120
Students majoring in Criminal Justice must achieve a "C" grade or better in each lower division and a "C-" or better in each upper division course applied to the major and a GPA of at least 2.0 ("C") for all upper division required courses applied to the major.

Required Lower Division Courses (12 Units)
CRJ 1Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society3
CRJ 2Law of Crimes3
CRJ 4General Investigative Techniques3
CRJ 5The Community and the Justice System3
Required Upper Division Core Courses (24 Units)
CRJ 101Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods 13
CRJ 102Crime And Punishment 13
CRJ 121The Structure and Function of the American Courts 13
CRJ 123Law of Arrest, Search and Seizure 13
CRJ 130Fundamentals of Corrections 13
CRJ 141Police and Society 13
CRJ 160Justice and Public Safety Administration 13
CRJ 190Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 13
Upper Division Electives (24 Units)
Select 24 units from the following: 224
Criminal Justice Administration
Police and Society
Police Administration 1
Contemporary Issues in Police Administration 1
Leadership in Criminal Justice and Public Safety 1
Planning for Justice and Public Safety 1
Justice and Public Safety Information Systems 1
Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 1
Investigation
Interviewing and Detection of Deception 1
Advanced Criminal Investigation 1
Introduction to Physical Evidence 1
Introduction to Crime and Intelligence Analysis 1
Corrections
Correctional Institutions 1
Community Based Corrections 1
Corrections Administration 1
Offenses and Offenders
Delinquency, Prevention and Control 1
Analysis of Career Criminals 1
Domestic Crime and Violence 1
Gangs and Threat Groups in America
Sexual Offenses and Offenders
Violence and Terrorism
Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution
American Criminal Justice and Minority Groups
Drug Abuse and Criminal Behavior
White Collar Crime
Law
Law of Responsibility 1
Law of Evidence 1
Juvenile Law 1
Administrative Law for Public Safety Personnel 1
Additional Courses
Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice 1
Women and the Criminal Justice System
Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 1
Criminal Justice Systems of the Future
Security Systems 1
Topics in Criminal Justice Administration 1
Internship 1, 3
Experimental Offerings in Criminal Justice 1
Co-Curricular Activities 3
Special Problems 1, 3
Supporting Courses
Government and Nonprofit Accounting
Cultural Diversity
Contemporary American Culture in Anthropological Perspective
Urban Anthropology
Rise of Religious Cults
Women Cross-Culturally
Culture and Poverty
Intercultural Communication
Digital Evidence and Computer Crime
Internet Security
Cyber Forensics
Professional Writing
Writing in the Social Sciences
Ethnic America
The Asian American Experience
Black Political Thought
Chicano/Mexican-American Experience
La Raza Studies
US Mexican Border Relations
Native American Experience
Genocide and Holocaust Studies
Pan African Studies
The Black Family in the United States
Geographic Information Systems
Constitutional Law
Constitutional Rights and Liberties
The Law and Bureaucracy
The Legislative Process
Politics of the Underrepresented
Public Policy Development
California State and Local Government
Social History of the United States
The City in US History
The African-American Experience, 1603-Present
Ethics and Social Issues
Professional and Public Service Ethics
Political Philosophy
Philosophy Of Law
Deductive Logic II
Cross-Cultural Psychology
Perception
Organizational Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Personality Theories
Psychology of Multicultural Groups
Stress Management
Social Psychology
Psychology of Adolescence
Psychological Aspects of Death and Dying
Abnormal Psychology
Law Enforcement for Forest and Park Rangers
Introduction to Statistics for Sociologists
Research Methods in Sociology
Ethnic and Race Relations
Political Sociology
Social Movements
Criminology
Delinquency
Issues in Courts and Prisons
Sociology of Deviance
Middle Eastern Societies and Culture
Crosscultural Theory and Practice: Issues of Race, Gender and Class
Chemical Dependency and Social Work Practice
Theories of Criminal Behavior
Crimes Without Victims
Poverty and Homelessness in America
The Child and the Law
Violence In The Family
Violence Against Women
Total Units60
1

Prerequisite: Restricted to declared majors and minors or instructor permission.

2

Students will collaborate with their Criminal Justice advisor to develop a plan of electives that reflects the student’s academic and professional interests. Electives must be drawn from at least two of the listed “Areas of Interest,” of which one must be from the “Supporting Courses” area. The Writing Intensive graduation requirement may be completed in the major. An approved minor may be substituted for up to 12 units of the major elective courses and fulfills the requirement for selection of a course from the “Supporting Courses”.

3

No more than 6 units of Credit/No Credit courses will be allowed toward completion of the degree.

Minor - Criminal Justice

Units required for Minor: 21

CRJ 1Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society3
CRJ 2Law of Crimes3
CRJ 4General Investigative Techniques3
CRJ 121The Structure and Function of the American Courts 13
CRJ 123Law of Arrest, Search and Seizure 13
CRJ 130Fundamentals of Corrections 13
CRJ 141Police and Society 13
Total Units21
1

Restricted to declared majors and minors or instructor permission.

Minor - Forensics Investigations

Units required for Minor: 21
Must be a chemistry or biology major and complete the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" or higher.

CRJ 1Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society3
CRJ 2Law of Crimes3
CRJ 4General Investigative Techniques3
CRJ 121The Structure and Function of the American Courts 13
CRJ 141Police and Society 13
CRJ 153Advanced Criminal Investigation 13
CRJ 154Introduction to Physical Evidence 13
Total Units21
1

Restricted to declared majors and minors or instructor permission.

Certificate in Law Enforcement

Units required: 18

Students participating in the Law Enforcement Candidate Scholars’ (LECS) program who wish to obtain a Certificate of Academic Achievement in Law Enforcement must complete the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" or higher. Courses for the Certificate program are applicable toward course requirements for the Criminal Justice major.  

CRJ 1Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society3
CRJ 2Law of Crimes3
CRJ 4General Investigative Techniques3
CRJ 5The Community and the Justice System3
CRJ 160Justice and Public Safety Administration3
CRJ 195Internship 13
Total Units18
1

CRJ 195 internship can count for 1-6 units of credit, but for the Law Enforcement Certificate it can only be taken once for 3 units.   

All courses and petitions for substitutions will need to be approved by the Law Enforcement Candidate Scholars’ Program and Criminal Justice Division and will reflect the criteria and learning outcomes of the Law Enforcement Certificate.

Additional eligibility criteria and certificate information can be obtained from the Law Enforcement Candidate Scholars’ (LECS) Program or Criminal Justice Division Advising Center. Visit www.csus.edu/hhs/lecs for more information.

Graduate Program

The Master of Science program in Criminal Justice is designed to provide broad knowledge and understanding of the field of criminal justice, law enforcement, legal processes, and rehabilitation of offenders. It also provides an extensive academic foundation for a growing variety of professional opportunities and facilitates professional development in preparation for positions of increasing responsibility. Curriculum objectives are based on the philosophy that the function of the professional criminal justice practitioner and educator is to aid the orderly development of society, to contribute significantly to the improvement of the quality of services, and to advance the criminal justice system. Students who anticipate pursuing graduate studies should prepare themselves for work on this level by selecting undergraduate courses which provide competence in the following areas: statistical analysis, behavioral science methodology, independent library research, and the writing of research papers.

The University's location in the state capital provides direct access to many local, federal, and state agencies through internship and fieldwork opportunities. All graduate students should consult the Criminal Justice Graduate Coordinator when planning their program of courses for each upcoming semester.

All work toward the degree must be completed within a seven-year period. The general University requirements for graduate degrees are explained in the "Graduate Studies" section of this Catalog.

Admission Requirements

Admission as a classified graduate student in Criminal Justice requires:

  • a baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting association;
  • a minimum 3.0 GPA in the last 60 units attempted and a 3.0 GPA in the major field;
  • a score of 4 or more in the Analytical Writing Section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test;
  • a letter outlining in some detail the applicant's interests, goals, and expectations in pursuing the MS in Criminal Justice; and
  • three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential for graduate study.

In addition, applicants are expected to have an undergraduate major in Criminal Justice or its equivalent. Whatever the applicant's undergraduate major, however, it is essential that each student have adequate preparation for graduate study. For this reason, some applicants (regardless of their undergraduate program) may be asked to remove deficiencies in their education by taking courses from the undergraduate curriculum before being admitted as a classified graduate student. In such cases, conditionally classified graduate status may be granted subject to completion of these courses with grade "B" or better. The number of units required to remove deficiencies will total no more than 15 and these must be taken in addition to the 30 units required for the MS. Any deficiencies will be noted on a written response to the admission application.

Admission Procedures

Applications are accepted as long as space for new students is available. If applications for graduate admissions exceed the capacity of the Department, the Department will limit admissions. Applicants will be rank ordered for admission based on an evaluation of the academic record, GRE scores, professional and life experience, references, proposed academic plan and potential for diversifying, and enriching the Criminal Justice graduate program. For more admissions information and application deadlines, please visit http://www.csus.edu/gradstudies/.

All prospective graduate students, including Sacramento State graduates, must provide the following:

  • an online application for admission;
  • two sets of official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, other than Sacramento State; and
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.
  • a letter outlining in some detail the applicant's interests, goals, and expectations in pursuing the MS in Criminal Justice; and
  • three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential for graduate study.

Approximately six weeks after receipt of all items listed above, a decision regarding admission will be emailed by the University to the applicant.

Advancement to Candidacy

Each student must file an application for Advancement to Candidacy for the master's degree indicating the proposed program of graduate study. This procedure should begin as soon as the classified graduate student has:

  • removed any deficiencies in admissions requirements;
  • completed at least 12 units in the graduate program with a minimum 3.0 GPA; and
  • taken the Writing Placement for Graduate Students (WPG) or taken a Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course in their discipline within the first two semesters of coursework at California State University, Sacramento or secured approval for a WPG waiver.

Students may not enroll in CRJ 502 before they are advanced to candidacy.

Advancement to Candidacy forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies. The student fills out the form after planning a degree program in consultation with the Criminal Justice Graduate Coordinator. The completed form should then be returned to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.

MS Degree in Criminal Justice

Units required for MS: 30
Minimum GPA: 3.0

Required Courses (18 Units)18
CRJ 200Research Methods in Criminal Justice3
CRJ 255Crime, Criminology and Criminal Justice3
CRJ 256Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System3
CRJ 260Management of Complex Justice Organizations3
Select two of the following:6
Critical Examination of Law and Justice
Graduate Seminar in Corrections
Contemporary Issues in Policing
Administration of Juvenile Justice
Electives (6-9 Units)
Select six units for the thesis/project option and nine units for the comprehensive exam option:6 - 9
Criminal Justice Policy Analysis
Criminal Justice Research and Program Evaluation
Critical Examination of Law and Justice
Politics of Crime Legislation
The Prison
Graduate Seminar in Corrections
Psychodynamics of Confinement
Contemporary Issues in Policing
Comparative Analysis of the Criminal Justice System
White-Collar Crime
Violence and Victims
Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System
The Nature Of Terrorism
Administration of Juvenile Justice
Personnel Administration in Justice Organizations
Criminal Justice Issues in Collective Bargaining and Arbitration
Criminal Justice Systems of the Future
Internship
CRJ 296 series course
Special Problems
Culminating Experience (3-6 Units) 1
CRJ 500Culminating Experience3 - 6
or CRJ 501
CRJ 502
Culminating Experience: Thesis/Project Development
Culminating Experience: Thesis or Project
Total Units30-33
1

Students requiring more than one semester to complete their culminating experience must  re-enroll in CRJ 502 .

CRJ 1.     Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Reviews the problem of crime and the societal response to criminals. Institutions discussed are those intended to discover the crime and the criminal and those designed to deal with the criminal, the victim, and society, once the criminal has been labeled. Finally, the bureaucracy of crime and its measurement as a social phenomenon are discussed.

CRJ 2.     Law of Crimes. 3 Units


Introduction to the case method of studying criminal law. Understanding and correlating the common law crimes and substantive law crimes. Study and emphasis on the classification and nature of crimes, the requisite elements of the major common law felonies and criminal responsibility of various persons involved in crime.

CRJ 4.     General Investigative Techniques. 3 Units


Techniques involved in the investigation of crimes; interview of victims and witnesses; questioning of suspects; organization and procedure in the investigation of crimes; crime scene searches; surveillance; use of scientific aids; and sources of information.

CRJ 5.     The Community and the Justice System. 3 Units


Examines complex, dynamic relationships between communities and the justice system in addressing crime and conflict with emphasis on the challenges and prospects of administering justice within a diverse, multicultural population and the roles played by race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, social class, culture, and justice professionals in shaping relationships within the justice system. Special topics include crime prevention, restorative justice, and conflict resolution and pure justice.

CRJ 21.     First Year Seminar: Becoming an Educated Person. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: E


Introduction to the nature and possible meanings of higher education and the functions and resources of the University. Designed to help students develop and exercise fundamental academic success strategies and to improve their basic learning skills. Also provide students with an opportunity to interact with fellow students and the seminar leader and to build a community of academic and personal support.

CRJ 101.     Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to Criminal Justice majors


Introduction to research methodologies used in the social sciences, with a special emphasis on those methods most often used in the study of crime and criminal behavior, police/court systems, and correctional institutions, policies, and programs. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to understand, critically analyze and assess descriptive and quantitative research studies. Topics include the roles of theory and ethics in research, hypothesis testing, and research design.

CRJ 102.     Crime And Punishment. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Criminal Justice major


This course provides an overview of the causes, consequences and responses to crime in society, with special emphasis on the use of theory and research to guide criminal justice policy and practice. The course surveys major theories of crime causation, examines consequences of crime on individuals and societies, and explores various perspectives on the appropriate role of criminal sanctions and offender treatment in modern day systems of justice.

CRJ 105.     Delinquency, Prevention and Control. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Comprehensive juvenile delinquency planning process and its contribution to effective delinquency prevention and control; new roles for delinquency control agencies (police, courts, and corrections); the Youth Service Bureau; innovative strategies in delinquency prevention programming.

CRJ 106.     Analysis of Career Criminals. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Observation and analysis of criminal career patterns using the following approaches: anthropological, autobiographical, psychological, psychiatric, and sociological. The examination of career criminal behavior patterns will focus upon: the process of induction into criminal activity; the deviant orientation of the professional criminal; the organization, life style, and activities of the specialized criminal; and the methodological problems associated with the measurement of recidivism.

CRJ 108.     Domestic Crime and Violence. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Detailed examination of the multiple causes, effects and dynamics of crime against children, spouses, domestic partners and the dependent elderly, the response of criminal justice agencies to these crimes and the impact of these crimes on their victims.

CRJ 109.     Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Analyzes the social construction of crime by news and entertainment media and introduces criminal justice students to the manner in which the media influences and shapes crime in their own society and in the criminal justice system. Analyzes images of crime and the criminal justice system that are presented through the major mass media within America, including a detailed analysis of media institutions, American pop culture, and the construction of crime and justice. Exposes students to a new way of looking at crime problems and provide them with a deeper understanding of how crime and the criminal justice system are both socially constructed by the news and entertainment media.

CRJ 111.     Women and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Survey of the roles of women as offenders, victims and employees in the criminal justice system. Examines statistics, research and the literature as it relates to female crime. Evaluates current patterns and practices of law enforcement, criminal courts and corrections relative to women as offenders, victims, and employees.

CRJ 112.     Gangs and Threat Groups in America. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Examination of criminal organizations in America. The problems posed by "anti-social groups," their structure and their history in contemporary American society. The spectrum of social sciences is employed in an examination of "illegal groups" and such issues as aggression and group dynamics. Styles such as street gangs, prison gangs and traditional organized crime are defined and studied.

CRJ 114.     Sexual Offenses and Offenders. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Exploration of relevant factors and dimensions of sexual offenses and offenders related to the Criminal Justice system, its cliental and practitioners.

CRJ 115.     Violence and Terrorism. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Systemically examines political violence, responses by government institutions to that violence and implications of both for the administration of justice. Content is structured along a continuum, ranging from small scale violence to mass violence - assassinations, terrorism by sub-national and transnational organizations, state terror and genocide. In recent years political violence has progressively drawn the American governmental institutions, particularly justice agencies, into the global picture of violence committed by both domestic and international terrorists.

CRJ 116.     Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Examines concepts, principles, techniques of conflict resolution and restorative justice in contemporary US legal system, global peacebuilding, across cultures, and comparative justice practices. The centerpiece is a classroom simulation that introduces students to theoretic analysis and practical knowledge on resolution of conflicts and crime. Addresses nonviolent responses to inter/intra state and community conflicts. Topics include negotiation, mediation, victim offender reconciliation, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), circle sentencing, transitional justice, peace treaty, transformative justice, intergroup dialogues, etc.

CRJ 117.     American Criminal Justice and Minority Groups. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Race & Ethnicity Graduation Requirement (RE), GE AREA D


Course examines the origins of racial/ethnic/gender/sex discrimination and disparities in the US justice system. Additionally, course provides a critical examination of the processes and outcomes of the justice system by reviewing the major theories of crime and number of minorities reported in crime data. Using discussions about various criminal justice policies and their impact on minority groups, the course assesses the changing dynamic of race relations and diversity in society and their influences on justice administration.

CRJ 118.     Drug Abuse and Criminal Behavior. 3 Units

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: GE AREA D


Sociogenic review of the case histories and life styles of selected juvenile and adult offenders with a history of drug abuse. An inquiry into the drug scene, "street" drugs, an examination of people who have abused drugs and have been guilty of delinquent or criminal acts for the purpose of determining the known and identified relationships between drug abuse and crime, and probing the many unknown relationships. A sustained and disciplined examination of the main issues and problems by the use of case studies, discussion groups, and student involvement.

CRJ 121.     The Structure and Function of the American Courts. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): declared majors or minors or chair permission.


Overview of the Federal and State court structures including jurisdiction, venue, roles of court participants, due process and post arrest procedures employed in adjudication, trial process, appellate review. Constitutional issues such as discretion, indigent rights, right to counsel, discovery, pleas, bail and preventive detention, competency, evidence suppression, double jeopardy, and speedy trial will also be addressed.

CRJ 123.     Law of Arrest, Search and Seizure. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared majors or minors or department chair permission.


Current and recent developments relating to arrest, searches, and seizures; study of constitutional rights predominately associated with the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments as related to criminal justice and its administration -- warrants, warrantless seizures, exclusionary rule, confession, eye-witness identification, electronic surveillance, entrapment, and state variance with federal rules. Case study method law course.

CRJ 125.     Law of Responsibility. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Substantive criminal law of responsibility and culpability. Topics include legal cause, mens rea, negligence, intent and its equivalents, motive, immaturity, mental incapacitates, mistake, and affirmative defenses including authority and privilege as found in American statute and case law. A case method law course.

CRJ 126.     Law of Evidence. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 121 and CRJ 123; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Law of evidence as codified and its complimentary interpretations by the courts. Topics include the admission and exclusion of evidence, relevance, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, the use of writings and demonstrative evidence, judicial notice, order of proof and presumptions, and issues relating to witness competency and privileges. Constitutional exclusions and their impacts are not covered.

CRJ 127.     Juvenile Law. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 102 and CRJ 121; restricted to CRJ majors or chair permission.


Overview of legal concepts and principles affecting the adjudication of delinquent children in juvenile and adult court systems, develops the ability to read and analyze difficult legal issues relating to juvenile law, and provides the information required to evaluate the effectiveness of the juvenile court system in the context of its stated rehabilitative goals and the potential impact of a shift in focus to a more retribution-oriented structure.

CRJ 128.     Administrative Law for Public Safety Personnel. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 121 and CRJ 123; restricted to CRJ majors or chair permission


Administrative law is the study of the adjudicatory and law making processes that take place within administrative agencies of the executive branches of government. Further, it is a study of the legal relationship between those agencies and the legislature, the courts, and private parties. Particular attention will be paid to the Federal Administrative Procedures Act, and the California Administrative Procedure Act.

CRJ 130.     Fundamentals of Corrections. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared CRJ majors or minors or department chair permission.


Overview and critical analysis of contemporary correctional theory and practice. Comparison of mainline American corrections with historical, cross-cultural, philosophical and non-traditional views of corrections. Controversial issues in contemporary corrections, including prisoner rights, victimization, the death penalty, unions, institutional corrections, community corrections, future of corrections, correctional careers, and administration and staffing of correctional programs.

CRJ 131.     Correctional Institutions. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 102 and CRJ 130; restricted to declared majors or chair permission


Role and function of the correctional institution in the administration of criminal justice. A review of institutional procedures: reception, classification, program assignment, mass custody, treatment programs, and release, including parole and discharge. The inmate social system and its relationship to the official world that contains it. The following topics will receive special attention: the determinate sentence; the confinement of repetitively violent offenders; the death penalty and its impact on prison management, inmate social services; prison reform; and the stresses experienced by institutional personnel.

CRJ 134.     Community Based Corrections. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 102 and CRJ 130; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Role of local and state government in the development of community-based correctional programs; regional detention facilities; recent trends in jail organization and management; ex-offenders and employment; the impact of community corrections on the criminal justice system.

CRJ 136.     Corrections Administration. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 130 and CRJ 160; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Concepts of administration; corrections as a component of criminal justice; organization and management of correctional services and correctional institutions for delinquent youth and adult offenders; probation and parole; and the legal and political contexts of corrections.

CRJ 141.     Police and Society. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared CRJ majors or minors or department chair permission


Examination of the origins, philosophy, objectives and priorities of the police service in the U.S. A. holistic analysis of political, social, economic, legal and other factors impacting the relationship between the police and the society they serve. Police use of discretion, police roles, police and minority groups, police and protest groups, police brutality, and police ethics are also studied.

CRJ 142.     Police Administration. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 141 and CRJ 160; restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Concepts of organization and management; relationships between police agencies and the public, other criminal justice agencies, and other agencies of government; organization for delivery of police services: first response, crime investigation, youth services, vice, communications, and information management.

CRJ 144.     Contemporary Issues in Police Administration. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 141; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.


Roles of police in a democratic society; analysis of public disobedience to law; racial and ethnic group relationships with police; public, official, and police corruption; police discretion; professionalism; development of criminal intelligence.

CRJ 151.     White Collar Crime. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior status, Criminal Justice or Fire Service Management major or chair permission


Introduces students to a variety of white collar crime issues, including definitional complexities, the causes, frequency and impact of economic crime, and victim and offender profiles. Governmental corruption, organizational fraud, consumer and environmental offenses, anti-trust violations and international schemes will be covered. Students will also become familiar with methods used to investigate, prosecute and sentence white collar offenders. Policy considerations will be discussed for controlling national and international white collar crime.

CRJ 152.     Interviewing and Detection of Deception. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 102; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.


Principles and techniques of interviewing and detection of deception studied from communication, physiological and psycho-social points of view. Introduction to the use of the polygraph; laws pertaining to confessions and admissions.

CRJ 153.     Advanced Criminal Investigation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 102; restricted to declared CRJ majors or declared Forensic minor or have chair permission.


Principles involved in the investigation of crimes; utilization of scientific aids in obtaining information from physical objects; concepts in obtaining information from and about people; concept of reconstruction of crime and profile of suspect; development of leads; investigative problems in major crimes; special problems in crime investigation.

CRJ 154.     Introduction to Physical Evidence. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 102; restricted to declared CRJ majors or Forensic Investigation minor or chair permission.


Provides an overview of the role of science in collecting and evaluating physical evidence as a component of the criminal investigation and legal processes. Various operations in the examination and interpretation of physical evidence are examined with emphasis on the role of science in supporting the investigator and in the litigation process. Suitable for both science and non-science majors.

CRJ 156.     Introduction to Crime and Intelligence Analysis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101; must be a declared CRJ major or have chair permission.


Introduction to crime and intelligence analysis with a special emphasis on those methods most often used in the study of crime and criminal behavior patterns. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary toward understanding crime analysis, intelligence analysis and mapping geospatial data. Topics include theory, the history of crime analysis, crime analysis technologies, intelligence analysis, and types/functions of crime analysis.

CRJ 160.     Justice and Public Safety Administration. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): restricted to declared CRJ majors or minors or department chair permission.


Examines the nature and development of public safety and criminal justice organizations in American society with attention to how the unique functions performed by these agencies has shaped and developed their nature. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the unique problems generated by administration of bureaucratic, public agencies in a highly politicized environment. Examines the influence of social and political factors on justice and public safety organizations.

CRJ 162.     Intergovernmental Relations, Finance and Budgeting for Public Safety Personnel. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 160 or PPA 100; Junior or Senior standing; must be a Criminal Justice or Fire Service Management Major.


An examination of the structure, organization and management of state and local government with particular attention to the interplay between governmental agencies that is focused on the operations and management of public safety agencies. Government leadership models, such as mayor and city manager will be examined. Finance, the state and local budgets, taxation, revenue and spending will be addressed.

CRJ 163.     Leadership in Criminal Justice and Public Safety. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 160; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.


Addresses role of leadership in shaping and directing complex justice and public safety organizations. Leadership styles, roles, communication, group dynamics and organizational culture are examined and applied to organizational maintenance, adaptation, and change. Also addresses the role of employee organizations and personal practices in shaping leadership options and styles in public agencies. Particular attention is focused on implementing leadership in the bureaucratic and public agencies typical to the fields of criminal justice and public safety administration.

CRJ 165.     Planning for Justice and Public Safety. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 102 and CRJ 160; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.


Addresses planning in complex justice and public safety organizations. Focuses on the role of planning in preparing for change, maximizing utilization of resources and addressing crime and public safety. Emphasis is placed on the use of planning to unify fragmented public agencies at multiple levels of government in preparing for disaster, controlling crime, and assuring public safety.

CRJ 166.     Personnel Administration in Criminal Justice and Public Safety Organizations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 160; declared CRJ major or chair permission


This course provides an understanding of history, theories, laws, and practices related to contemporary as well as future criminal justice/public safety personnel administration and practice.

CRJ 167.     Collective Bargaining and Arbitration Issues in Public Safety. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Must be a declared CRJ major or chair permission.


This course is designed to provide the public safety student and/or criminal justice student, practitioner and/or administrator with an understanding of public safety personnel practices in the area of collective bargaining. Labor-management relations, dispute resolution, arbitration, and the various laws that govern labor-management relations, at all levels of government, will be covered.

CRJ 168.     Justice and Public Safety Information Systems. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared majors or chair permission.


Introduction to criminal justice and public safety information systems. Provides a framework for understanding the needs, types, capabilities and applications of information systems to the field. Current uses are surveyed and future potential applications are examined.

CRJ 169.     Emergency Management. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 164; Criminal Justice or Fire Service Management major, or instructor permission.


Course reviews the history of emergency management, the current systems in place to manage mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery and the coordination and communication required to do so. Diverse responses to various emergencies will be presented with detailed examination of the roles of various levels of government and integration required. The formal declaration of emergencies and federal aid procedures, agencies involved and their administration will be covered.

CRJ 170.     Human Trafficking and Slavery. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior level and CRJ majors only; or department chair permission.


The course explores the international and domestic legal framework that defines human trafficking and slavery and analyzes the major theories and current research on related causes and risk factors. The role of involvement of transnational organized criminal groups and vulnerability of social groups are discussed. Lastly, the course provides a critical analysis of effective strategies in victim identification, protection, prosecution, and prevention as instrumental components in assessment of crime control policy.

CRJ 172.     Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior status; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission


Examines representative criminal justice systems from a variety of nations with emphasis on the role of history, culture, social and political values and economic institutions in shaping institutions of justice including law, police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice systems and practice. Attention is paid to conflict and cooperation between criminal justice systems and ideologies that occur when peoples of different cultures and systems are in close proximity.

CRJ 174.     Criminal Justice Systems of the Future. 3 Units


Societal structures, definitions of deviance and criminal behavior, social problems related to criminality, the nature of systems for handling criminals and sanctions in future societies.

CRJ 176.     Security Systems. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.


Purposes, functions and historical development of industrial security in the U.S. Co-responsibilities of security personnel and line supervisors; principles of physical security, document protection, pilferage prevention and employee programs for plant and inventory protection. Survey of related laws and cooperating agencies of government.

CRJ 181.     Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 100 and CRJ 110; must be a CRJ major.


Topics of interest to criminal justice students and faculty will be offered as the need arises.

Note: May be repeated provided the topic is different.

CRJ 190.     Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 102, CRJ 121, CRJ 123, CRJ 130, CRJ 141, CRJ 160; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission with senior status, and GWAR certification before Fall 09; or WPJ score of 80+; or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W; or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X; or WPJ score 70/71 and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X.

General Education Area / Graduation Requirement: Writing Intensive Graduation Requirement (WI)


Examination of current issues in criminal justice with an emphasis on the application of law, management, practice and ethics to analysis of contemporary criminal justice policy. The culminating event for criminal justice majors with an emphasis upon written and oral communication, research and analytical thinking.

CRJ 191.     Topics in Criminal Justice Administration. 3 Units


Prerequisite: CRJ 101 and CRJ 102; restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission.

CRJ 195.     Internship. 1 - 6 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared majors or chair permission and senior status


Supervised work and experience in justice or public safety related agencies designed to expand the student's understanding of techniques, procedures and problems that occur in these agencies. Supervision provided by both faculty and agency personnel.

Note: may be repeated for credit

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 196.     Experimental Offerings in Criminal Justice. 2 - 4 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared majors and minors or instructor permission.


To be offered in the various fields of Criminal Justice in response to student needs.

CRJ 196A.     The Mentally Ill Individual in the Criminal Justice System. 3 Units


Overview and analysis of how mentally ill individuals interface with the criminal justice system, from first contacts with the police, to their entry into the jails, courts, and prisons, and then reentry into the community via parole and probation. The history of how the mentally ill became so embedded in the criminal justice system, whether mental illness has become criminalized, evidence-based mental health programs, and treatment for this population will be covered.

CRJ 196B.     Law of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. 3 Units


Current and historical developments relating to the laws surrounding homeland security and emergency management. Topics include the legal framework for the U.S. domestic preparedness and national incident management system, the role of the military in emergency response and homeland security, and the legal jurisdiction and authority of federal, state, and local public safety, as well as private sector institutions, in terrorism prevention and response. Course utilizes cases, statutes, executive orders, government reports, and scholarly research.

CRJ 196R.     Offender Rehabilitation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Department permission, Junior/Senior status.


This course focuses on research, training and supervision through service learning. Students will be taught about the scientific literature on offender rehabilitation, and the practical information on how to work with a small caseload of offenders in a Reentry center using a cognitive behavioral approach in a one-to-one format. Students will gain training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 196S.     Ethics and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): CRJ Majors or department chair permission


Purpose of course is to learn various ethical considerations within the criminal justice system. Course will briefly explore the classical, philosophical foundations of ethics and proceed into surveying modern, ethical decision-making among the various criminal justice components. Criminal justice system ethics and decision-making of the police, prosecution, courts, corrections, and probation/parole from a managerial standpoint and a line perspective will be examined and critiqued. Emphasis will be placed on viable, practical solutions to ethical conundrums.

CRJ 198.     Co-Curricular Activities. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the sponsoring professor and the Division Chair.


Co-Curricular activities related to the subject matters and intellectual concerns of the Division of Criminal Justice, including service learning, related community service assignments, and service on University and community policy making bodies.

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 199.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to declared CRJ majors or chair permission and senior status.


Individual projects or directed reading, open only to those students who appear competent to carry on individual work.

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 200.     Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status, satisfactory completion of a basic statistics course.


Research theory and methodology in Criminal Justice; research designs; conceptual models; design and preparation of Master's thesis prospectus.

Note: Graduate Writing Intensive (GWI) course.

CRJ 205.     Criminal Justice Policy Analysis. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, CRJ 200, CRJ 255, and CRJ 260, which may be taken concurrently; or instructor permission; GWAR certification before Fall 09, WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109 M/W.


Examination of responses of the criminal justice system to major current issues with attention to factors influencing their effects; review of uses and limitations of various responses; appraisal of the consequences of various criminal justice policy alternatives.

CRJ 207.     Criminal Justice Research and Program Evaluation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status, CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260 or chair permission


Systematic review of selected evaluations of major criminal justice programs, demonstration projects, experiments, and innovations; introduction to basic techniques of interpretation and analysis of research findings to determine outcomes.

CRJ 210.     Critical Examination of Law and Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Examines the historical, theoretical, and practical developments that gave rise to the dominance of legal formalism in the American legal tradition. Examines the multiple challenges to that model, including legal realism, the sociology of law, critical legal studies, and critical race theory. Will critically examine the intersection of the American legal tradition with issues concerning the possibility and implementation of social justice strategies in diverse, and increasingly global contexts.

CRJ 220.     Politics of Crime Legislation. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, CRJ 200, CRJ 255, and CRJ 260, which may be taken concurrently; or instructor permission; GWAR certification before Fall 09, WPJ score of 70+, or at least a C- in ENGL 109 M/W.


Familiarizes students with the legislative process, the performance of the legislature as it relates to the handling of crime bills and the role of interest groups and politics in the process of initiating and passing laws. Topics include: theoretical models of lawmaking, factors in legislative decision-making, the politics of crime legislation, ethics in politics, and how people influence and use the legislative process.

CRJ 230.     The Prison. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status, CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260 or chair permission.


Contemporary penal institutions will be studied using the literature in the social sciences, the biographies of prisoners, and the writings of prison critics.

CRJ 231.     Graduate Seminar in Corrections. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256, CRJ 260 or chair permission.


Provides a historical analysis and discussion of the current state of corrections and correctional management. Theories of punishment will be addressed and management techniques will be covered. Goes beyond concepts of institutionalized corrections to explore modern correctional alternatives, correctional policy and special topics relevant to corrections.

CRJ 233.     Psychodynamics of Confinement. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Examination of current conditions of confinement; review of confinement related factors common to populations in penal institutions, military installations, mental hospitals, prisoner of war camps, and concentration camps; investigation into the broader implications of conditions of confinement for society; survey of practical strategies for developing and implementing standards for confined populations.

CRJ 240.     Contemporary Issues in Policing. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


In-depth study of contemporary issues in policing in the U.S., including management, organization and issues confronting law enforcement at federal, state and local levels.

CRJ 250.     Comparative Analysis of the Criminal Justice System. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Examination of alternative systems for criminal justice provides a basis for improved understanding of organizational and functional components within given sociopolitical environments. Through comparison of formal and operational levels, decision-making processes are made explicit with reference to historical, legal, social, and economic parameters in the administration of justice.

CRJ 251.     White-Collar Crime. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256, CRJ 260 or chair permission.


Examines the underlying theories and the diverse nature of white-collar crime. Studies offenses associated with corporations, occupations, governments, enterprises and individuals. Examines the offenders and the organizational culture that facilitates criminal action. Topics include embezzlement, political corruption, employee theft, fraud, computer crime, and environmental crime. Study consequences for victims, offender characteristics and the theoretical explanations for the decisions by criminals to commit white-collar crimes.

CRJ 252.     Violence and Victims. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260 or instructor permission


Comprehensive survey of the literature on violence emphasizing high-fear crimes; the repetitively violent criminal; the emerging field of victimology; improved delivery of social services to victims; juvenile gangs; and the response of criminal justice agencies to urban violence.

CRJ 255.     Crime, Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status.


Study of major criminological theories, their ideological premises and basic assumptions, interrelationships, and the shifts in emphasis and focal points in the study of criminality. Analyzes post and current applications of theory to the intervention strategies of crime control.

CRJ 256.     Historical Analysis of the American Criminal Justice System. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status


Evolution and historical foundations of American patterns of crime and violence, criminological theories, law enforcement structures and philosophies, the adult criminal justice system, and the juvenile system will be traced through three distinct historical periods: Colonial and Early American Roots, 1609-1814; Creating the American Criminal Justice System, 1815-1900; and Reforming the Criminal Justice System, 1900 to present.

CRJ 257.     The Nature Of Terrorism. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260 or chair permission


Theoretical approaches to the study of terrorism and analysis of terrorist theory and strategies. Topics include operational definitions of terrorism, typologies of terrorism, threat analysis of terrorism in the U.S., and responses of the criminal justice system to acts of hostage-taking, bombing, political murder, and narco-terrorism.

CRJ 260.     Management of Complex Justice Organizations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status.


Description, analysis, solution, and synthesis of contemporary management problems in criminal justice organizations; presentation and exemplary implementation of management concepts significant to criminal justice organizations; review of case studies for management problem recognition; and the study of operational systems.

CRJ 262.     Administration of Juvenile Justice. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Theoretical and empirical study of the cause and control of delinquent behavior. Assessment of policies and practices of agencies involved in juvenile justice including the impact of recent federal and state legislation.

CRJ 266.     Personnel Administration in Justice Organizations. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255,CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Provides an in depth understanding of the history, theories, laws, processes, issues and unique environment shaping contemporary personnel administration in a variety of criminal justice agencies.

CRJ 267.     Criminal Justice Issues in Collective Bargaining and Arbitration. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Designed to provide the criminal justice practitioner and administrator with an understanding of criminal justice labor-management relations and collective bargaining and difference resolution, along with conflict resolution practices as applied to inmate-custody and control situations.

CRJ 289.     Criminal Justice Systems of the Future. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; chair permission.


Societal structures, definitions of deviance and criminal behavior, social problems related to criminality, the nature of systems for handing criminal and sanctions in future societies.

CRJ 295.     Internship. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status


Supervised graduate student placement in selected criminal justice agencies with emphasis on research and evaluation project assignments.

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 296A.     The Mentally Ill Individual in the Criminal Justice System. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate student status


A critical analysis of how mentally ill individuals interface with the criminal justice system, from first contacts with the police, to their entry into the jails, courts, prisons, and then reentry into the community via parole and probation. Current and historical topics about the mentally ill will be explored via an in-depth analysis of the current literature regarding the mentally ill in the criminal justice system, which will be reviewed and critiqued.

CRJ 296K.     Emergency Management. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260 or chair permission.


Introduction to the authority, organization, responsibilities, challenges, and issues related to emergency management in California and the U.S., examines the implications of citizen involvement in preparation for and management of natural and man-made disasters. Graduate students will consider impact of terrorism on democratic governance issues and potential future trends and issues.

CRJ 299.     Special Problems. 1 - 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Classified graduate status; CRJ 200, CRJ 255, CRJ 256 and CRJ 260; or chair permission


Individual projects or directed reading. Open only to students who are competent to carry on individual work.

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 500.     Culminating Experience. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy.


Completion of a thesis or project approved for the Master's degree. A thesis requires an original contribution to knowledge in a traditional research format. A project is a significant undertaking of a pursuit appropriate to the profession. It must evidence originality and independent thinking, appropriate form and organization and a rationale.

CRJ 501.     Culminating Experience: Thesis/Project Development. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy.


Provides students with an opportunity to develop a foundation for their culminating experience. Students will complete the initial components of their project or thesis including the Statement of the Problem, Literature Review, and Human Subjects application. Students are expected to read assigned materials and engage in weekly discussions about their progress and experience with other students, the instructor, and their advisor (as needed).

Credit/No Credit

CRJ 502.     Culminating Experience: Thesis or Project. 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Advanced to candidacy; satisfactory completion of CRJ 501.


Completion of a thesis or project approved for the Master's degree. A thesis requires an original contribution to knowledge in a traditional research format. A project is a significant undertaking of a pursuit appropriate to the profession. It must evidence originality and independent thinking, appropriate form and organization and a rationale.

Credit/No Credit